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ahoy53

How does private schools in the Philippines compare to public schools in the U.S.

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rainymike

Just to keep things in perspective. Yes, I would like my kids to go to a good school. I think that can be had in the Philippines.

 

But sending a child to the best school in the world is not any guarantee of success in life. Nor is attending a mediocre school a guarantee of failure or mediocrity. At some point in time kids must grow up and take ownership for who and what they are. I might try to create as much opportunity for my kids with schooling and parenting, but at same point in time, I will let go. And they will be on their own.

 

There are kids who through their efforts are able to do well in life whatever their educational level or lack of education they might have.

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JamesMusslewhite

James, you have long been extolling the your lad's  HS experience.  Has he taken his SAT's  ACT yet?     Did the education prep him enough to be US  college bound level.    I think I remember you said he is back in TX with Granny.  Is he back in a   TX high school system to get the 2 grades he missed? 

 

My daughter graduated last year .. from a private HS..  and now is in UNI here in CEBU.   The rigors of going to class and commuting and having more responsibility..may help her for REAL college in a couple of years.   Her writing abilities went way down...after moving here in the 7 th grade where she was always top of her class.  She lost confidence in Maths  ..where she always did well... and  Lost here enthusiasm for Chemistry..because of the way it was taught her (rote memory --- no lab -even though they had to buy lap attire and goggles for the experiements that never happened.)   

 

Yes my son Arthur graduated this year and scored quite well when he took the College entrance exams here this year. We were told by the principle his grades and entrance scores were more than addiquate for him to step directly into any university of his choosing here in the Philippines. We are very proud of his accomplishment. Before we moved here in 2008 he had never attended a Filipino school nor did he speak any Filipino. He is now in Austin, Texas as you mentioned where he is living with my father and stepmother as he gets settled in Austin. He will not need to take two years of additional US High School as his HS diploma is recognized and accepted in the US. He will take his SAT/ACT exams this year and I will let you know how he scored. He is in Austin now because he asked me at the beginning of his last school year if after graduation if he could have two years off before he attends college. He worked hard and his grades this year were exceptional so I granted his wish. He has been there 5 months were he has finished driving school and secured a job, as it was his desire to develop some life experience and decide what he wants to do with the rest of his life. I personally think it is commendable and a wise decision on his part.

 

I do not know what school your child attended so I really can not comment on her situation. It seems the experience your daughter had and that of my son were quite different. I only know of the curriculum that he completed at Caraga Regional Science High. His curriculum is one of the best offered in the Filipino public schools and probably exceeds most private schools and even rivals the very best of them. Regional Science Highs are college preparatory school. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caraga_Regional_Science_High_School

 

Of course he did missed out on many of the US High School extra curriculums such as Social disobedience 101, Drug/Alcohol 101, Peer Pressure 101, Political Correctness 101, Feminism 101 and Socialism 101. His school had no unwed pregnancies, drug epidemics, and excessive dropout rates. Unfortunate for him, he and his fellow students were taught civil/community service, respect for his teachers, proper manners, and the need to study and personal achievement so I really hope he will not be too scarred for the rest of his life. :biggrin_01: I'm glad your daughter is in a University and I hope she does well and has a bright future. I am sure you have given her the confidence and social skills that will allow her to achieve her dreams.

 

The following is merely an obsevation of something I have noticed over the years on the forum. Whenever there is a thread on this subject there are always such negative and even rather condescending comments, which always makes me wonder why. There are over 18,000 registered Universities in the world and even more Colleges, Jr. Colleges and advance trade schools; so if the education is so lacking here in the Philippines, than why does the Philippines always seem to have at least 3 Universities ranking in the top 700 Universities worldwide? This just seems to be a bit of a contradiction.

 

So I have to ask myself the following simple questions:

a. Did the expat spend even one hour’s time trying to research the better schools here to find their locations before they chose where to located? Or did they just throw a dart at a map, or merely only concentrated on their own consideration of personal needs?

b. Do these expats actively participate in their children’s school PTA programs so they can actively assist the teachers? Or did they just simply dump that responsibility on the wife or the yayas?

c. And if not, than why not?

Because if the expats did not do these things than where does the real fault lie? Just how many expats actually have spend more time polishing the seat of a barstool with their butts than they have sitting down with their own children in the evening helping with their studies?

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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littlejohn

Where can I find the rest of that quote or an online verification?

 

I have made the quote by Rizal before, if you read it then please pardon the repetition, "...show me the state of your schools and I will show you the state of you country..."

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Ozepete

 

 

Of course he did missed out on many of the US High School extra curriculums such as Social disobedience 101, Drug/Alcohol 101, Peer Pressure 101, Political Correctness 101, Feminism 101 and Socialism 10. His school had no unwed pregnancies, drug epidemics, and excessive dropout rates. Unfortunate for him, he and his fellow students were taught civil/community service, respect for his teachers, proper manners, and the need to study and personal achievement so I really hope he will not be too scarred for the rest of his life.

 

And your son would have been exposed to all of this and more if he was in an Oz high school also. Sad that he missed these common features of the great western learning institutes.. NOT!

 

I am always surprised at the bucketing the Phils school system gets from members as it is quite contrary to my (little) experience and observation.

Our two Phils boys left their Panalipan (Catmon) school to relocate to Oz and restarted schooling here. I was surprised that they both found that they were well ahead of children the same age here and in fact one was jumped up a year. Since then the eldest went to the RMIT and was tops year after year there while the younger son has qualified as an accountant with LaTrobe uni and has been offered to seek a masters. Neither had any learning disadvantage coming here, in fact the opposite.  

 

Also we have just returned to Oz after time in Panalipan and again observed school children there that far more disciplined and learning focused than I see here in Oz.. 

 

Just my observations so I would have no hesitation in recommending that school at least. 

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smokey

Interesting. Our neighbor across the street has a boy in high school at SHS Ateneo de Cebu. His days are filled mostly with math, science, social studies, English and Mandarin. He brings home tons of homework every night, and doesn't have time for much else. I don't know if he was required to participate in the arts (like playing an instrument), but I have never heard him practicing or carrying an instrument case. It doesn't sound like you got your money's worth.

moneys worth hummm i think its fair to say the one daughter we have cost about 1 1/2 million peso to sent to san carlos for 9 years of school and now she makes 20,000 peso a month something is really wrong either the schools are way to much money or the jobs suck 

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JamesMusslewhite

And your son would have been exposed to all of this and more if he was in an Oz high school also. Sad that he missed these common features of the great western learning institutes.. NOT!

 

I am always surprised at the bucketing the Phils school system gets from members as it is quite contrary to my (little) experience and observation.

Our two Phils boys left their Panalipan (Catmon) school to relocate to Oz and restarted schooling here. I was surprised that they both found that they were well ahead of children the same age here and in fact one was jumped up a year. Since then the eldest went to the RMIT and was tops year after year there while the younger son has qualified as an accountant with LaTrobe uni and has been offered to seek a masters. Neither had any learning disadvantage coming here, in fact the opposite.  

 

Also we have just returned to Oz after time in Panalipan and again observed school children there that far more disciplined and learning focused than I see here in Oz.. 

 

Just my observations so I would have no hesitation in recommending that school at least. 

.

I believe it is because some are not actually aware of the true current state of the schools and educational systems back home in their home countries. Most have merely driven by High Schools rather than go inside them for decades. Some actually never raised their own kids as someone else actually did that for them. Some did poorly in school themselves and some have never attended a single class of higher education. All they actually have is “rectum optics” and no real personal knowledge on the subject and are merely engaging in the usual “Pinoy-bashing”. Some may just have lazy kids underachieving kids who are not properly applying themselves and just have generally bad study habits, just like they actually did when they themselves barely scrapped by or dropped out of school. Some are just plain intellectually dishonest or just have really bad attitudes towards the Philippines. Some could just trying to be smartasses and jerks.

 

Just before I came here in 2008 my son's Elementary school demanded students ware school uniforms to avoid gang colors, the purchasing of clear plastic back packs (to see possible weapons or drug paraphernalia, students to pass through metal detectors, be subject to body searches and regular drug-dog walkthroughs. Police were coming into classes of 4th and fifth graders to conduct interrogations as to their parent’s activities at home, and given classes on homosexual and gay lifestyle acceptance without even the consideration of requesting parental consent. US schools are plagued with street gangs, addictive drugs, high rates of teen pregnancies, excessively high dropout rates, increasingly lowering budgets, growing numbers of inept teachers and school districts top heavy with incompetent school administrators.

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senseless

Just before I came here in 2008 my son's Elementary school demanded students ware school uniforms to avoid gang colors, the purchasing of clear plastic back packs (to see possible weapons or drug paraphernalia, students to pass through metal detectors, be subject to body searches and regular drug-dog walkthroughs. Police were coming into classes of 4th and fifth graders to conduct interrogations as to their parent’s activities at home, and given classes on homosexual and gay lifestyle acceptance without even the consideration of requesting parental consent. US schools are plagued with street gangs, addictive drugs, high rates of teen pregnancies, excessively high dropout rates, increasingly lowering budgets, growing numbers of inept teachers and school districts top heavy with incompetent school administrators.

 

Wow that's pretty intense. You'd think for a red state that they wouldn't do these sort of things.

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JamesMusslewhite

Wow that's pretty intense. You'd think for a red state that they wouldn't do these sort of things.

It is neither Red or blue, it is about an evasive out of control educational system using our school children as a twisted social experiment.

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Headshot

moneys worth hummm i think its fair to say the one daughter we have cost about 1 1/2 million peso to sent to san carlos for 9 years of school and now she makes 20,000 peso a month something is really wrong either the schools are way to much money or the jobs suck 

 

And your point is...what? Obviously the salary scale is tanked here. That goes without saying. However, a person's income does not have a direct correlation to the cost of their education. There are a lot of things that are important. You, of all people, should know that. A lot of drive, perseverance and the willingness to do what others will not is more important to success than where you got a diploma. However, in the big scheme of things, a recognized diploma can at least give a person a foot in the door in the beginning. It just won't guarantee success. Only outstanding performance after they start work will do that.

Edited by Headshot
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wacobay

My son graduated from what is considered one of the top public schools in Leyte (Visayans State University, VISCA,). We returned to Texas in October and our son will be enrolling next week in a local community college in a suburb of Houston. He will be taking a test given to all students who enroll to see if they need remedial math and English or can enroll in regular classes. This will be my first real indication of how well the Philippine school system prepared him. I'll let you know the results, even if it makes me look bad as a parent. :)  

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Monsoon

How close does your child’s high school come to this curriculum?

 

 

The closer a school can get to this ideal, the better the education will be (or at least the opportunity for education).

 

That's all fine and dandy, but how much of it is reality vs. a written 'wish list'? 

 

If you read the rules and regulations in any Philippine government procedure it all sounds good, but execution is, well, lacking. 

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Headshot

That's all fine and dandy, but how much of it is reality vs. a written 'wish list'? 

 

If you read the rules and regulations in any Philippine government procedure it all sounds good, but execution is, well, lacking. 

 

That is absolutely true, and indeed, it is an educator's wish list. It kind of creates a gold standard for schools here. However, if you don't have a standard to hold schools against, how can you methodically evaluate schools to assess their value vs. cost. I certainly wouldn't want to set the standard at a point where most schools already meet them. How mediocre that would be. If you want the best education for your children, you need to at least know what a good education looks like. Then, you can discuss with administrators and teachers what can be done to achieve at least parts of it. Improvement only comes by setting a goal and then following up to measure success at reaching that goal. If you meet it, then you set a new goal. If you don't meet a goal, then you find a new methodology to help you meet it.

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MaKe

don't you mean "how do private schools .....compare to public schools in the US?"

 

My step child goes to a private here and I believe with the exception of English language training, it is far beyond many public schools in the US!  In the states, the quality of education depends on the district funding which is a function of the tax base in the area. 
 

Having worked in public schools in the states, both of my children were in private schools through middle school. 

 

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John B

the Chines school near the overpass from Ayala to Country Mall is supposed to be the best outside of Manila.   Also horrendously expensive.

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jigsy

Many definitions of 'best'. If you expect not to be living here for ever and you want your kids to succeed outside of the Philippines, then I would not look beyond CIS. At least they can transfer to other International Schools easily.

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