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ahoy53

How does private schools in the Philippines compare to public schools in the U.S.

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ahoy53

I have wondered if my kids were getting a better education in private school,in the Philippines,then in Florida.

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USMC-Retired

The only difference between is Florida and the Philippines is money.  What you obtain free or cheap in the US will cost you more in the Philippines.  However no matter where you send you children either the Philippines or the US your involvement is 100% required.   You can not get a adequate free education in the Philippines as where you could in the the US.  The key word is adequate.  There are numerous reasons as to why.  So to just answer your question it is YES.  

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cebubird

Well, you didn't say if you were talking public or private in Florida

If it is a typical middle or upper class neighborhood, the public schools in Florida(excluding the Miami area)will be far better than any private school here.

Maybe the Cebu International School is the exception.

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sjp

We switched our daughter from public to private in grade 6. She found it so hard we had to get her a tutor. She is now in grade 8. I looked at her work and it is no where near what a grade 8 student in Canada would be studying, Very far behind here in the Philippines.

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BossHog

If you're looking to quantify your kids' educational attainment here relative to a public education in Florida...

 

The Florida Department of Education has Comprehensive Assessment Tests and the Computer-Based Practice Tests (ePATs) are available here:

 

http://fcat.fldoe.org/fcat2/

Edited by BossHog

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rainymike

I think it's not so useful trying to compare. Odds are what you see as the curriculum in any school was borrowed from the United States in the first place. So the standards are similar.

 

The issue is how well the school achieves those standards - whether in the US or Phils, whether its public or private. In the Phils, I've been through several private schools. A couple were decent. One was a joke. The other so-so.

 

There are some of the major handicaps for the schools in the Phils that I see.

 

Infrastructure (library, classrooms, etc) aren't very good. On the other hand, the old brick and mortar concept of the library may be obsolete with the internet today.

 

Languages (English and Tagalog). The native language of my kids is Cebuano. Learning both English and Tagalog is challenging for them. The amount of time available to really develop those skills along with the other subject matter is probably not adequate.

 

Multiple Intelligence. It's a popular concept in the Philippines. It's not a bad concept, but without more hours in the classroom available, I feel that it waters down the curriculum. It's one of the popular concepts from the US that they should have passed on. Would prefer more focus on the basics.

 

What to do? My partner and I try to fill in the gaps.

 

 

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ozboy

Its not only the lessons that makes a student, its the extra activities and interest groups within a school program, that makes a big difference....haven't seen much of that there in Ph...

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cebubird

We currently have our 3 year old in a nursery school(private)and I look at the classes of the older students, and I see a joke. Visited another private here that goes all the way to high school, and I see the same crap. Whole bunch of emphasis on "projects" "crap" entertainment

We pay for the kid to go 2 hours a day, then have to pay for a "watcher" for him-everyday "homework" crapfor a 3 year old, and wife is running to market tobuy junk every day for his "project homework".

Sat in a 5th grade class and out of 15 students, maybe 5, watching/listening to teacher. Kids squatting in their seats, babbling, sleeping, and this is a fee based private school.

I questioned the pastor/administrator where our kid is about some of their policies, and he said they have to do what dep ed tells them to do

There is a public school near us, and seems every day is entertainment and games.

I would think that any public school in an upscale neighborhood in ANY state in the US would be better than ANYthing offered here.

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4thDan

Public schools that I am familiar with (asawa is a 4th year high school teacher with 18 plus years of experience) are basically way behind the US public school standard.  The government is intent on trying to seem up to international standards by changing the term of school (from the 11 year to K-12 system) and messing with the curriculum so that there is less stress on basics.  I have two step children in "college" in Cebu now (one 3rd year and one 1st year) and their study load and course work are about on par with a real good senior high school or maybe freshman level college in the US.  

The problems are not with the teachers, per-say, though there is ample "dead wood" there to rebuild Tacloban.  The problem stems from a general attitude from the government down to local DepEd and that being, keep them ignorant and they are easier to rule and control.  Specialized course studies; medical, etc., seem to be improving and becoming more inline with international levels.  But the "general education" levels are still eons behind.  

I have made the quote by Rizal before, if you read it then please pardon the repetition, "...show me the state of your schools and I will show you the state of you country..."

Any system which takes the whole high school out of classes for a month to practice for a local dance contest, as ours did/does, has, IMHO defined itself.  The students seem to be being trained to be ready to join the dance troops in the prisons instead of contributing citizens.  But then, when a high school graduate can only get a job that will last 6 months and then they are let go, what can you expect?  

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cebubird

Public schools that I am familiar with (asawa is a 4th year high school teacher with 18 plus years of experience) are basically way behind the US public school standard.  The government is intent on trying to seem up to international standards by changing the term of school (from the 11 year to K-12 system) and messing with the curriculum so that there is less stress on basics.  I have two step children in "college" in Cebu now (one 3rd year and one 1st year) and their study load and course work are about on par with a real good senior high school or maybe freshman level college in the US.  

The problems are not with the teachers, per-say, though there is ample "dead wood" there to rebuild Tacloban.  The problem stems from a general attitude from the government down to local DepEd and that being, keep them ignorant and they are easier to rule and control.  Specialized course studies; medical, etc., seem to be improving and becoming more inline with international levels.  But the "general education" levels are still eons behind.  

I have made the quote by Rizal before, if you read it then please pardon the repetition, "...show me the state of your schools and I will show you the state of you country..."

Any system which takes the whole high school out of classes for a month to practice for a local dance contest, as ours did/does, has, IMHO defined itself.  The students seem to be being trained to be ready to join the dance troops in the prisons instead of contributing citizens.  But then, when a high school graduate can only get a job that will last 6 months and then they are let go, what can you expect?

 

WOW!!!!!! I think you have summed it up perfectly, and that quote--also very much applies to US schools in general.

Edited by Headshot
Fixed quote

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tomaw

This is the same problem as the cost of living threads. The problem with both is that there are way too many variables. If you look at the standard of education in Massachusetts compared with Kentucky you're going to find one hell of a difference.

Edited by tomaw
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tomaw

Has any of you ever thought of just creating your own school among members and other expats? homeschooling courses as well as SAT prep courses are all available on the Internet. you can have total control over the curriculum to be taught and the teachers to be hired. probably also cost you less money and a better ratio of students to teachers.

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senseless

This is the same problem as the cost of living threads. The problem with both is that there are way too many variables. If you look at the standard of education in Massachusetts compared with Kentucky you're going to find one hell of a difference.

 

http://www.kentucky.com/2013/01/10/2471228/kentucky-ranks-10th-in-national.html

 

I think you'd be surprised by the education system in kentucky. If there's one thing we don't cheap out on, it's our schools. But at the same time, I've personally witnessed those who should not pass being passed with social promotion. As our education system is county/city based (paid for by property taxes), quality obviously changes from county to county and city to city (some are better than others as they have more money to spend).

 

I went to a public school for a number of years before going private. Most kids ended up learning calculus before graduating. My younger brother was in a better school district than I and was learning calculus in 6-7th grade. Those aren't even considered AP classes.

 

..

 

Having dealt with a lot of the local kids [in the philippines] as i run a number of game servers for popular online video games, I can say every school here sucks. I have met kids from every walk of life. Poor kids in public schools playing in cafes around the islands to kids having gone to the best high schools and colleges in NCR with private systems on fiber. One thing is abundantly clear, none of them are up to the standards of the US, and the standards in the US -- IMO -- are no where near what they should be.

 

In the philippines, if I end up having to stay here long enough to have a need to start educating my child, I would probably hire 2-3 specialized teachers to create a curriculum based on my requirements and home school (teachers would do the teaching, not home school as in, me teaching).

Edited by senseless

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JamesMusslewhite

My son attended Caraga Regional Science High School here in Surigao city which is a public High school and I feel he received a quality education preparing him for college. There are good schools if one is willing to research and locate themselves were these schools are located.
 

http://Science High schools in Philippines

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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samatm

Now most PH public schools provide better education than all but the most expensive Phils private schools.    Dep  Ed is getting more and more funding,  More real equipment is coming into the classrooms,  teachers are getting higher pay and  pension plan that the private schools cant provide without pricing themselves out of contention.     

 

Basically education system here sucks unless you got the bucks.  (and then its  only mediocre) 

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