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Cleaning the Hard drive?


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Back in the good old days when DOS was king, there was a utility via DOS to go in and clean the unused areas of the drive by making them all zeros.  When you delete a file it does not actually go away, and can stay on your drive forever, so by forcing zeros throughout the unused portion of the drive, you effectively cleaned the drive of old files.  Now we have Windows, but that utility has gone by the by or has it?  How does one accomplish cleaning the hard drive these days?  Does anyone know?

 

Yes, I know you can wipe the entire drive, but what I'm talking about just wipes the unused portions of the drive.  Ok?  Thanks.

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This what you are looking for

 

less than 30 sec  on google

 

http://www.pcmag.com/slideshow_viewer/0,3253,l=255105&a=255105&po=8,00.asp

Windows 7: The Top 10 Hidden Features

8. Wipe Free Disk Space08 It's no secret (or at least, it shouldn't be) that when you delete files or folders in Windows, they're not actually erased—the space they took up is simply marked as "available for use," which allows the files to be recoverable (with the right software) until they're overwritten with new data.

There is a utility built-into Windows (even XP Pro and Vista) that will overwrite all the free space on a hard drive, insuring any files you've deleted stay dead. Launch a command prompt and type cipher /w:X where X is the letter of the drive or partition you want to wipe. Be patient—the process can take a long time if you have a lot of free space.

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This what you are looking for

 

less than 30 sec  on google

 

http://www.pcmag.com/slideshow_viewer/0,3253,l=255105&a=255105&po=8,00.asp

Windows 7: The Top 10 Hidden Features

8. Wipe Free Disk Space08 It's no secret (or at least, it shouldn't be) that when you delete files or folders in Windows, they're not actually erased—the space they took up is simply marked as "available for use," which allows the files to be recoverable (with the right software) until they're overwritten with new data.

 

There is a utility built-into Windows (even XP Pro and Vista) that will overwrite all the free space on a hard drive, insuring any files you've deleted stay dead. Launch a command prompt and type cipher /w:X where X is the letter of the drive or partition you want to wipe. Be patient—the process can take a long time if you have a lot of free space.

 

I realize this will not help you "wipe" your hard drive. However, upon loading the link the Woolf posted, I began going through the various "Hidden Features" of Windows. I got down to "God Mode", which is pretty neat. Simply create a new, empty folder on your desktop. Name it:

GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

Then double click to open it. Pretty neat.  Other stuff is on the list as well. I haven't seen item number 10 yet.

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Nice but it takes out the entire drive, when I just want to clean up the unused space and leave my programs and data intact!

oky2va.jpg

Thee is always at least one smart ass lurking about.

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This what you are looking for

 

less than 30 sec  on google

 

http://www.pcmag.com/slideshow_viewer/0,3253,l=255105&a=255105&po=8,00.asp

Windows 7: The Top 10 Hidden Features

8. Wipe Free Disk Space08 It's no secret (or at least, it shouldn't be) that when you delete files or folders in Windows, they're not actually erased—the space they took up is simply marked as "available for use," which allows the files to be recoverable (with the right software) until they're overwritten with new data.

 

There is a utility built-into Windows (even XP Pro and Vista) that will overwrite all the free space on a hard drive, insuring any files you've deleted stay dead. Launch a command prompt and type cipher /w:X where X is the letter of the drive or partition you want to wipe. Be patient—the process can take a long time if you have a lot of free space.

I tried this, but I got an error message saying "cypher" was not a recognized command prompt!

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I tried this, but I got an error message saying "cypher" was not a recognized command prompt!

Did you try chiper     i i i i i i i

 

Grrrrrr    should be  cipher

 

Thanks  to johnboy999

Edited by Woolf
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miles-high

The most secure way to clean your HD is IMO, copy or backup the data using USB3.0, eSATA or other faster device to another HD...

 

Then, clean the HD using one of the shredder software (using RCMP, DOD, DES, etc., etc. approved protocols... you can Google it or using one of these freewares:  http://download.cnet.com/File-Shredder/3000-2144_4-10662831.html). Note: Formatting is not good enough...

 

Once completely shredded, transfer the necessary files back to the original HD…

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johnboy999

Did you try chiper     i i i i i i i

Might be better if he tries cipher !!!!!!!! :P

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Correct my post      :fool:

Edited by Woolf
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