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fluke

I need a motorbike (Yamaha SZ16 ?) and I need a license, tags and insurance

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fluke

Begin with I am not there yet. I have NEVER operated one. I am 57 and in pretty good shape. I expect to be there in the near future and will be in the Cebu city around Talisay area. I seen the anarchy so I guess I know what I am getting into there. Just a necessary evil. A car maybe safer but much more of hassle driving. I expect to use it mostly to go local shopping, gym and maybe maybe a long ride to SM, Radisson Blue, S&R or even Ayala but we'll see about that one.

 

I'm thinking Yamaha SZ because I am around 200 pounds or 90ish KG so better to go a little bigger. I know it is a manual shift but I drive a stick at home LOL. Where is a good place pick one of these up deal wise ? It is too new a bike for Sulit or Ayosdito to be worth buying used.

 

The drivers motorbike license any place I can find the rules or is it like the traffic ... anarchy ? Tags, I think I heard there was a shortage ??? Really ? And insurance just get it from the dealer ? I guess I just need metric tools to work on stuff no SAE needed ?

 

Any advice or info appreciated.

 

Thanks

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cebulover2000

You probably will be too distracted with shifting, your focus should really be on driving. An automatic scooter would be best, maybe a rental? And practise somewhere with not much traffic first. Your foreign license is good for 90 days (if in English, otherwise get an international DL). Yes, you won't get registration and tags etc. IF you buy a new motorbike. Mandatory insurance will be issued by the LTO, together with the plate and tags. I really have no idea how long the processing for those will take, it depends on the LTO, there is one in Talisay which is said to be good.

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Ronin

If you are in the US take the Motorcycle safety foundation course (msfc). That's the best advice you'll get today.

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Woolf

 

 

Mandatory insurance will be issued by the LTO

 

LTO does NOT issue insurance, it is NOT an insurance company or an agent of any

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SkyMan

LTO does NOT issue insurance, it is NOT an insurance company or an agent of any

Yes, but the insurance offices are all there very close to the LTOs its almost part of the LTO compound.

 

Sent from my LG-P880 using Tapatalk

 

 

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Canuck Joe

If you are in the US take the Motorcycle safety foundation course (msfc). That's the best advice you'll get today.

this

 

Hey there OP, I appreciate your sense of adventure. But don't just buy a motor bike and head out on these crazy roads.

Take a course because there will be too much to handle learning to ride and learning how the people drive here...getting hurt in a third world country is not fun.

The "rules of the road" must be learned by observation, there are tips and tricks people can tell you but it only sinks in with observation and practice.

Regarding a small bike and your weight concern when you think you are ready there is no harm starting out renting a completely auto scoot like a Mio. I'm 230 and it hauls me my wife and daughter around(but have to replace rear shock twice a year lol)

The Skydrive has an even beefier spring.

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woodchopper

SZ16 can be had new for around 65+,,i paid 68 for mine.

 

very good machine thus far.

 

if u have an overseas license,,LTO will grant u a riders license even if u r only a car license overseas,,i assume u have same?

 

I would readily give more info etc if u so desired old chap?

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enoonmai

I have NEVER operated one. I am 57 and in pretty good shape.

Think very carefully about this, I was almost killed a few years ago on the Transcentral and also had almost no experience on a bike. The accident was not my fault but my inexperience may have been a factor; I don't know, don't remember much. If you decide to go ahead, wait at least a month before getting on one and just carefully observe. Really, that goes for driving a 4 wheel also. The rules here are very different.

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Hy H

Think very carefully about this, I was almost killed a few years ago on the Transcentral and also had almost no experience on a bike. The accident was not my fault but my inexperience may have been a factor; I don't know, don't remember much. If you decide to go ahead, wait at least a month before getting on one and just carefully observe. Really, that goes for driving a 4 wheel also. The rules here are very different.

 

“The rules here are very different”

 

I disagree with this little bit.

 

Rules are perhaps pretty much the same as everywhere but no one gives a fcuk about rules.  You try following a copper riding a scooter. He will break every rule written in a book like all other riders, drivers.  Stop at lights …maybe just to blow his nose on the road.  Just learn your bike off the road first.  Riding a bike here is not actually very difficult cos of the slow speeds in city.  Just do not do any sudden changes of direction.  Follow the flow of the traffic and definitely focus like never before on anything either side forward of your front wheel. Remember all traffic going same direction, ones they past your front wheel they have right of way to cut you out.  Expect the unexpected. There`s all different vehicles pedestrians. Kids. beggars, peddlers, dogs, cats, chickens, goats, rocks in different sizes in the middle of the road, bits of all sorts spare parts, potholes, excavations ,low hanging rooflines n power lines and anything else you can think of. Out in some country roads they dry rice on the road and not very happy if you blast tru it on your rocket.  And last the bloody exhaust smoke. Try following a heavy laden truck for few kilometres. You covered in this black shit. Your mouth tastes like you just swallowed an full ashtray.  Great ay.   No one is out there to hit you and there is not really any aggravated road rage here like for instance cities in Australia.   Have fun.

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fluke

Yep I wish I had posted this 3 months ago instead of 3 weeks before I get there. It seems like I should take a course but don't think I can find one here at this time of year ( winter and holiday ). I gotta think about this because where I want to live in Talisay I need transpo. I'll be returning back here to Maryland in May for a month, at least that's the plan. I may do it ass backwards and take my chances for a few months. Try to limit my driving some to down the hill to the Gaisano and my gym in Tabunok. The class is 17 hours over 4 days. 6 hours classroom and 11 on the bike (I guess). I have ridden on the back of a bike in Cebu on many, many occasions so I am aware of the traffic and smog and what I call anarchy as far as rules of the road. I just wish I knew what the other guys are going to do LOL. Yep 3rd world emergency care yikes. What to do ???

 

OK how about the tags ?

 

Tools to work on my bike, only need metric no SAE ?

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Ronin

In my experience...

 

If you are buying your bike new it will take about 1 month to receive the OR and CR.  The dealership will secure these for you.

 

Until you get those you will need a "Conduction Permit", this is a piece of paper from the LTO that grants you permission to ride your bike until you get the OR/CR.  This is valid for one week at a time and must be renewed at the LTO each week.  It costs about 200p IIRC.  The dealer may also do this for you.  I did my own as the LTO was close and the paperwork was simple.

 

As far as plates, they may take over a year to get but this is not a problem as everyone here is in the same boat.  Once you get your OR/CR you will know what your plate number will be.  You can then have someplace make an official looking plate for you - done deal.  However there is another LTO form to fill out to get permission to use the temporary plate but I doubt many people even bother getting this.

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Ronin

 

 

Tools to work on my bike, only need metric no SAE ?

 

Forgot to address this...

 

When I bought my FZ16, the dealership included routine maintenance for what seemed like a long time so I didn't need any tools.

 

Labor is so cheap here that I don't even bother to work on my bikes.  For instance, I have met a local Honda mechanic and he makes house calls :D  I give him something between 200 and 500p depending on how long it takes him and how quickly he responds to my request.

 

Yea, I'm lazy and I don't enjoy turning a wrench much anymore, especially since I don't have my own garage and readily accessible parts stores for tools.

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enoonmai

I disagree with this little bit.   Rules are perhaps pretty much the same as everywhere but no one gives a fcuk about rules. 

By "rules" I don't mean LTO regulations. The rules that the locals begin learning as infants straddled across handlebars so that by the time they're riding on their own they have an intuition no foreigner will ever have. Motorbikes are at the bottom of the food chain. I responded to the post because the OP's situation and my own seemed to be very similar to when I moved here. But he's made his decision and I wish him well. I've already taken my last motorbike ride.

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SkyMan

However there is another LTO form to fill out to get permission to use the temporary plate but I doubt many people even bother getting this.

I have one. Smoke tester wouldn't test without it. p50, no expiry, no big deal.

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Hy H

By "rules" I don't mean LTO regulations. The rules that the locals begin learning as infants straddled across handlebars so that by the time they're riding on their own they have an intuition no foreigner will ever have. Motorbikes are at the bottom of the food chain. I responded to the post because the OP's situation and my own seemed to be very similar to when I moved here. But he's made his decision and I wish him well. I've already taken my last motorbike ride.

 

You are quite right. Having a major stack and hospitalisation will definitely change everyone`s thinking towards the risks of riding here.  

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