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What is China thinking, and to what end?


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Jack_be_nimble

 

Satellites see all. The Chinese DF-21D is a very asymmetric weapon that negates the sphere of carrier operational area.

 

"China is developing what could be seen as the ultimate such weapon, a real nightmare for the U.S. Navy. Since at least the mid-1990s, Beijing has been developing a highly advanced ballistic missile, the DF-21D, popularly dubbed “the carrier-killer.” On paper, such a missile could truly complicate Washington’s ability to move naval vessels as a hedge against China’s growing military might.

How the missile works is key to understanding its deadly potential. The weapon is mobile, making its detection difficult — even under the best of circumstances. When fired, the missile is guided using advanced radar, satellites and possibly even an unmanned aerial vehicle. Various reports indicate it has a maneuverable warhead potentially capable of defeating missile-defense systems. It slams down on its target — an oceangoing vessel like an aircraft carrier — at speeds of Mach 10 to 12. Even more frightening, the missile allegedly holds the ability to attack naval vessels up to approximately 1,000 miles away, outranging by many times the strike range of all U.S. aircraft aboard existing carriers.

Until recently, considering the science fiction-like description of such a weapon, many doubted the ability of China’s still-evolving defense industry to develop the missile. Many have pointed to the inability of Soviet engineers in the 1970s to develop similar weapons. Hitting a moving target on the high seas is not an easy feat; only a world-class scientific and defense industry would even make the attempt.

However, simply dismissing China’s capability to develop such a missile may have been wishful thinking. A recent report from the Washington-based Jamestown Foundation mined Chinese sources and publicly available information to conclude that America has reason to worry.

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/oct/31/kazianis-chinas-carrier-killer-missile/#ixzz2nsAFuV96 

 

 

Exactly.

 

However, we need a president (always) with big enough balls to scare the crap out of China.  I would make a crazy president (perhaps go too far) I would dismantle the air defense zone China set up. And then threaten with WW3 if they even think about launching a single missle at our carriers.

Edited by Jack_be_nimble
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agreed.. no need to feed the trolls...

it depends on whether the poster is serious or just trying to provoke. There is no point in arguing (or discussing) with a flamer.

More like the dumb ass Chinese sailors can't control their boats so the US had to maneuver to avoid sinking the Chinese garbage barge they call their Navy.   See, I can spout sill crap just as well

Mr. Mike

 

Satellites see all. The Chinese DF-21D is a very asymmetric weapon that negates the sphere of carrier operational area.

 

"China is developing what could be seen as the ultimate such weapon, a real nightmare for the U.S. Navy. Since at least the mid-1990s, Beijing has been developing a highly advanced ballistic missile, the DF-21D, popularly dubbed “the carrier-killer.” On paper, such a missile could truly complicate Washington’s ability to move naval vessels as a hedge against China’s growing military might.

How the missile works is key to understanding its deadly potential. The weapon is mobile, making its detection difficult — even under the best of circumstances. When fired, the missile is guided using advanced radar, satellites and possibly even an unmanned aerial vehicle. Various reports indicate it has a maneuverable warhead potentially capable of defeating missile-defense systems. It slams down on its target — an oceangoing vessel like an aircraft carrier — at speeds of Mach 10 to 12. Even more frightening, the missile allegedly holds the ability to attack naval vessels up to approximately 1,000 miles away, outranging by many times the strike range of all U.S. aircraft aboard existing carriers.

Until recently, considering the science fiction-like description of such a weapon, many doubted the ability of China’s still-evolving defense industry to develop the missile. Many have pointed to the inability of Soviet engineers in the 1970s to develop similar weapons. Hitting a moving target on the high seas is not an easy feat; only a world-class scientific and defense industry would even make the attempt.

However, simply dismissing China’s capability to develop such a missile may have been wishful thinking. A recent report from the Washington-based Jamestown Foundation mined Chinese sources and publicly available information to conclude that America has reason to worry.

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/oct/31/kazianis-chinas-carrier-killer-missile/#ixzz2nsAFuV96 

 

DF-21D is old news, and the counter measures (so claims the navy) are very effective! Talking about asymmetric warfare in the maritime sense...this has been recognized and planned for as well. Examples...drones aboard carriers. drones aboard submarines, stealth fighters, close-in submarine antiship action. To say nothing of long range, land based aircraft.I might also add that a single ship, or multiple ships, in a vast ocean, can vanish, if all electronic emissions go silent.

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Brucewayne

A couple of points..

 

The term duty trawler was what the navy called the ubiquitous Soviet Elint collecting platforms (poorly disguised as fishing boats) that  sometimes tailed US fleets while at sea.

 

I sometimes think we tend to overstate China's so called... long range thinking and planning. If they were such great forward thinkers, they should have been a superpower centuries ago.

 

While aircraft carriers are large targets, the supercarriers of today can be very hard to locate, attack and sink. They have multiple layers of threat detection, and defense. They can absorb tremendous punishment, and still conduct flight operations. Damage control and firefighting drills are constantly conducted and the flight deck can be patched up quickly if necessary.

 

Don't forget that they don't go very near any fighting.

After all they are carriers of the actual weapons and not a delivery tool.

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rainymike

As I sit down at my Lenovo computer (which I think was partly made in some kind of a joint venture with NEC); when I go shopping and am surrounded by so many products made in China, even the ones with American brand names; it seems that there is an emerging China that is positioning itself to be a leader in the global economy.

 

I'm far less concerned with China as a realistic military threat. (LOL ... I'm more concerned that America's domestic and foreign policy will keep us plugged into ongoing wars with a very fuzzy mission while slowly eroding the rights of its own citizens and citizens abroad.) 

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Majorsco

Lenovo is formerly IBM. The small computer division of IBM was sold to Chinese Lenovo several years ago. Surprised it got US govt approval considering export control laws but it did.

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SomeRandomGuy

http://www.infowars.com/chinese-moon-display-contains-image-of-europe-being-nuked/

 

this was from info wars today regarding china's space program

 

 

thought it would be in the same context as this.

 

IF this link is not allowed please remove it

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Majorsco

I'd say it is related ideologically, if not tactically.

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rainymike
Lenovo is formerly IBM. The small computer division of IBM was sold to Chinese Lenovo several years ago. Surprised it got US govt approval considering export control laws but it did.

 

Ahhh, but that's the point isn't it? America is great at inventing stuff. The developed countries in Asia are great at stealing, producing and marketing them. A few decades back, the big fear was Japan and how Japan stole a lot of American technology. Now that's the kind of global competition/warfare I want my kids to understand and learn. 

 

Bottom line. China gets the money. And Americans get to say, well we invented it, but we can't afford to produce it with American labor and maintain market share in the world economy. So we get to carry on the great debate about wages at McDonalds instead. Sigh ... progress.

 

Over a decade ago, I made my first trip to China. What I saw was amazing since I was in one of the interior cities of China. We were there on business to try to work a deal with a Chinese university to deliver programs there. One of the first people I met outside the gaze of the Party that hovered over us (for our protection I think), were some young Chinese students at an internet cafe. One girl in particular spoke with flawless English and described her goal of being an announcer for CNN or something like that. Others spoke of careers in international business or technology. I think that's the real China that's emerging. The other physical evidence of change was the appearance of McDonald's (which was really popular), Kentucky Fried Chicken, and Walmart. The leadership was turning the city around, building infrastructure like crazy. 

 

Probably a few fossils still in the way of progress and all for saber rattling. But I think in time, China will move away from that. Japan is a country without a whole lot of resources. Their military attempt to build empire was a colossal fail, but their economic rebirth was a big success. I think the smart countries in Asia learned from that mistake.

 

What did the university want from us? They wanted business programs - particularly accounting. And not because American accounting methods were better ... we all knew that while we were trying to penetrate China with our educational programs ... they were planning to catch up and take us on big time down the road. Knowing American accounting practices and speaking English was their way of opening the door into the heart of America. 

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