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One man’s view of driving in the Philippines…


miles-high

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CardiacKid

 

 

I think about this subject a lot as I ride in my taxis.  I choose not to drive because I don't think I can adjust.  I would be to angry and frustrated with some of the stupid driving and I would want to "hold my ground" as I did back home and that surely won't work here.
 Exactly the reasons that I quit driving here after a couple of days. At the time I had difficulty controlling my temper and realized I would probably end up in jail or dead. 
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For visitors, my suggestion would be don’t drive… A chauffer-driven car can be had at only about $50 to $70 a day… It’s a steal if you consider the thousands of dollars you may need to spend if you go

You have to respect someone who appreciates- and accepts- their limitations.  Its the guys  behind the wheel with the same attitude who do NOT appreciate it that scare me.

Miles, you should have put a warning in the subject line. I bet when whippy saw those figures, he almost had a heart attack.           Been there. Done it. Actually, I have driven a jeepney from

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same and the close calls not even that close...

I have to accept the way traffic and things in general work here and adapt to it or be the grumpy faced foreigner who pisses of his wife with constant complaining and always comparing this country to his own..(I am still working on the last part)

 

This ..........

 

G/f always tells me to calm down and don't get angry. "This is the Philippines and you are not back home" she says "Filipinos carry bolos"

 

That usually calms me down, but I must admit it can be very, very frustrating driving in the Philippines

 

 

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It's not that bad and I say this after 5 years of driving in and around Cebu.  At least the traffic's not fast and while you do need about 10 pairs of eyes it's quite do-able but the main thing is to keep cool and just let the crazy ones get on with their own antics while keeping a safe distance.  Night driving is what I really don't like and now try to minimize - stupid day-time behavior can usually be seen but at night the unlit vehicles, motorcycles and pedal bikes, and the crazy pedestrians just get a bit too much at times. 

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Driver's Ed wouldn't help in PI. You can't teach common sense or self preservation can you? The maybe 10% of the Dgte drivers who in the West would be deemed suicidal and taken off the road are beyond educating in better driving

 

whose common sense?  I always laugh when folks from different countries  or cultures believe 'their  common sense' should dominate.  Common sense in China or the Philippines isn't the same as US common sense, which may be similar to UK common sense, but not  the same.

 

 

I've been driving here for about 4 months.  It's totally nuts!!! But so was driving in China, Australia, Japan and Ireland.  I find some people here to be very courteous and focused on other drivers and others not. A few things I've learned:

  •  I need to drive more aggressively than in the US.
  •  the bigger the vehicle, the more respect on the road (don't play chicken with the buses!)
  • the smaller the vehicle, the less rules
  • there are no 'lanes' here despite how the road is painted
  • the function of the yellow line or double yellow lines is to make the road more colorful
  • the king of the road has a pecking order-buses, jeepneys, motorcycles, lastly private vehicles

  

 

I think some folks actually take a test to get a license, but since there is no enforcement, why follow the rules?

Granted driving at night without lights or so much as a reflector seems suicidal, but so does wearing dark clothing and crossing

outside a cross walk. 

 

I don't hurry, am more alert on the road and really work at being safe.

Now I rarely shout at other drivers....easiest to turn up the music and ignore others as much as possible. 

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udonthani

Miles, you should have put a warning in the subject line. I bet when whippy saw those figures, he almost had a heart attack. :D

 

 

 

 

As far as driving goes, I love driving in the Philippines. Come to think of it, I have enjoyed driving in Thailand and Cambodia as well. All three are fairly similar, with Thailand being the most disciplined of the three. 

 

 

the figures don't bear this out. Thailand's road traffic death rate is easily the highest in south east Asia, and is among the highest in the world (see below).

 

but I think very definitely the roads in south east Asia in general and the Philippines in particlar are far safer than they can seem to some foreigners, who can tend to just take one look and throw their arms up in despair. They can never get past the initial culture shock. It just isn't as dangerous, as it looks.

 

the average fatality rate in the world is 18 per 100,000 inhabitants.

 

here are the ASEAN figures :

 

Singapore 5.1

Brunei 6.8

Myanmar 15.0

Cambodia 17.2

Indonesia 17.7

Philippines 17.9

Timor-Leste 19.5

Laos 20.4

Viet Nam 24.7

Malaysia 25.4

Thailand 38.1

 

it is also not very appropriate for Americans to be giving lectures, on road safety to anybody. The road traffic fatality rate in the United States is one of very the highest of all the world's rich countries and it is in fact a national disgrace, although it has improved in recent years. Road traffic fatality rate in the US is now down to 10 per 100,000 whereas in the Philippines it 18, per 100,000.  In the UK, it is less than 3.

 

so it is actually far more dangerous in the US compared to the UK, than it is in the Philippines, compared to the US.

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miles-high

* the bigger the vehicle, the more respect on the road (don't play chicken with the buses!)

* the king of the road has a pecking order-buses, jeepneys, motorcycles, lastly private vehicles

 

It appears, at least in NCR, to go by the price of the vehicle...  :D

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Monsoon

I bought a jeepney and used it as a moving van. Drove it from Cebu to Dumaguete and onwards to Siquijor.

 

My driving rant is all metro manila based. Once in the province its all.gravy in.comparison.

 

 

 

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

 

 

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Brucewayne

the figures don't bear this out. Thailand's road traffic death rate is easily the highest in south east Asia, and is among the highest in the world (see below).

 

but I think very definitely the roads in south east Asia in general and the Philippines in particlar are far safer than they can seem to some foreigners, who can tend to just take one look and throw their arms up in despair. They can never get past the initial culture shock. It just isn't as dangerous, as it looks.

 

the average fatality rate in the world is 18 per 100,000 inhabitants.

 

here are the ASEAN figures :

 

Singapore 5.1

Brunei 6.8

Myanmar 15.0

Cambodia 17.2

Indonesia 17.7

Philippines 17.9

Timor-Leste 19.5

Laos 20.4

Viet Nam 24.7

Malaysia 25.4

Thailand 38.1

 

it is also not very appropriate for Americans to be giving lectures, on road safety to anybody. The road traffic fatality rate in the United States is one of very the highest of all the world's rich countries and it is in fact a national disgrace, although it has improved in recent years. Road traffic fatality rate in the US is now down to 10 per 100,000 whereas in the Philippines it 18, per 100,000.  In the UK, it is less than 3.

 

so it is actually far more dangerous in the US compared to the UK, than it is in the Philippines, compared to the US.

 

Compare how many people in England own a car as opposed to how many in the states, then compare that percentage to the number of traffic fatalities per 100,000 miles or Kilometers driven and I am sure you will see that the numbers are very close.

The reason I bring this up is that I think (not sure, but I think) is that drivers in England don't drive as much on a yearly basis as Americans do and I remember hearing that not as many Brits own car at least percentage wise.

 

I'm not sure how they computed their figures and what I said here may be a moot suggestion, but it is just a thought.

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jtmwatchbiz

 

 

Compare how many people in England own a car as opposed to how many in the states, then compare that percentage to the number of traffic fatalities per 100,000 miles or Kilometers driven

 

 and i think if you applied that same method of measurement to the philippines the actual figures would be shocking!

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Brucewayne

 and i think if you applied that same method of measurement to the philippines the actual figures would be shocking!

 

17.9 is a lot considering how few actually own a vehicle here.

Lots of scooters, I know, but still there are a LOT of households that don't even own one.

Of all the actual drivers, I would venture to guess the number should be 35 instead of 17.

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Compare how many people in England own a car as opposed to how many in the states

 

Then compare the size of the UK with its 60+ million population and a land mass equivalent in size to some smaller States.  I would guess the UK roads have traffic far in excess of anywhere but the largest Cities in the USA.

 

I believe there are 12 cars per 10 household in the UK, with approximately 27 million passenger vehicles on the roads.

 

 

To keep on topic: For me, the scariest part of driving is seeing one of the large trucks stacked up high with logs.  Plenty of those use the national highway around here, and I've seen what happens when they don't secure the logs properly.  I give them a wide berth.

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To keep on topic: For me, the scariest part of driving is seeing one of the large trucks stacked up high with logs.  Plenty of those use the national highway around here, and I've seen what happens when they don't secure the logs properly.  I give them a wide berth.

 

Last Tuesday morning on the way to Mactan Airport going along Reclamation through Mandaue I ended up behind a battered old truck carrying circular drainage culvert sections loaded down the truck-bed (ready to roll, so to speak).  When we got to one of the intersections and stopped at the traffic lights I pulled up a couple of (small) car lengths back and said to my wife "Well, those will make a big mess of whatever's behind if that rear gate breaks and they roll off".  Interestingly, no one cut in on me to fill the space I'd left!  I guess nobody wanted to be in the suicide seat looking up at those big concrete sections and wondering if they were likely to shift.  

 

As soon as we had a chance, I was off past that truck as fast as our little Suzuki would go.  I've seen plenty of dangerous loads on worn-out trucks with tires way past their use by dates.  This was one of the most dangerous looking.   

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udonthani

Compare how many people in England own a car as opposed to how many in the states, then compare that percentage to the number of traffic fatalities per 100,000 miles or Kilometers driven and I am sure you will see that the numbers are very close.

there may be something in this but I still think it does not explain just why Americans are so much more at risk of dying on the roads than just about the inhabitants of any other rich country. USA car ownership is high at nearly 800 per 1000, and the UK is only 520, but 800 is so high it actually means that a lot of those cars, are not used hardly at all. Australian ownership rate is over 700, but their road traffic fatality rate is only slightly over half that of the United States. There is no doubt as far as I am concerned that the road traffic fatality rate in the US is one of those stats, like infant mortality, that stand out, as one of those things that the US is just not doing very well - although they have managed to bring it down - like all the other countries have - quite a lot  especially in recent years,

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thebob

Car ownership per capita isn't relevant as the statistic is expressed in morts per km.

 

Train is the safest way to travel in Cebu, there hasn't been a injury for more than 40 years.

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Compare how many people in England own a car as opposed to how many in the states, then compare that percentage to the number of traffic fatalities per 100,000 miles or Kilometers driven and I am sure you will see that the numbers are very close.

The reason I bring this up is that I think (not sure, but I think) is that drivers in England don't drive as much on a yearly basis as Americans do and I remember hearing that not as many Brits own car at least percentage wise.

 

I'm not sure how they computed their figures and what I said here may be a moot suggestion, but it is just a thought.

Here is the answer

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_traffic-related_death_rate

Edited by Woolf
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