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One mans view of the Philippines


hoz

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People from remote areas or even in other big islands move to Manila or Cebu to find jobs (only to find out that there is nothing there for them). One reason why cities are over populated. I've been to provinces like Bohol and Negros for example, there are big houses but mostly owned by foreigners. If they were Filipinos, they are mostly seafarers/ seamen.

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RogerDuMond

 

 

And if you don’t think they are not poor, who are?

 

def of poverty "state of being poor: the state of not having enough money to take care of basic needs such as food, clothing, and housing"

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def of poverty "state of being poor: the state of not having enough money to take care of basic needs such as food, clothing, and housing"

There you go

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My drivers make more than that per month!

 

Got any openings? I may be willing to fly back today. :D


 

 

If they were Filipinos, they are mostly seafarers/ seamen.

 

When those fellas return to the Philippines, they aren't hurting for money. Some of the wealthiest Filipinos I have ever personally known, were sea going men. 

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Got any openings? I may be willing to fly back today. :D

 

 

 

When those fellas return to the Philippines, they aren't hurting for money. Some of the wealthiest Filipinos I have ever personally known, were sea going men. 

I know. And not very many of them are successful to stay in that job til they retire. My point is, there are still a lot of people here who are in poverty.

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udonthani

There you go

I'd say it is more like 50% not 25% that are so poor, they cannot be sure of taking care of basic elementals. Trying to make out that just because you are living as an extended family in a series of elevated shacks with no electricity and no services you are going to be happy, is just ridiculous.

 

only pampered, privileged and blind foreigners cold possibly make such a case.

 

I'm pretty sure about the bottom 50% of Filipinos. I know where they are. It is the top 50%, I cannot put my finger on quite so easily.

Edited by udonthani
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I know. And not very many of them are successful to stay in that job til they retire. My point is, there are still a lot of people here who are in poverty.

 

The ones I am talking about, have retired and returned to the Philippines to enjoy their retirement years. 

 

But, yes, I agree with the latter part of your statement. There are many - too many people in poverty in the Philippines.

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I live in small mountain village. Most light a fire for morning food. The typhoon came,12 houses gone. I helped the senior citizens, The church bought pirate gasoline to broadcast halleluja, nothing given to the people. When my freezer went down the locals bought 20 kilos of pork in ten minutes. Two spent 25 thou on generators. Two new motorbikes around. This seems to be the average where I live.

 

I see to much of the live for today attitude. They mortgage themselves to death without a thought for future consequences. Not so much poor but many are financially dislexic.

 

So many ask me for money but never tell me of the 4 hectares of land they may have tucked away in the North

Edited by hyaku
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This has been an interesting thread, though not that much to do with the original blog post that was referenced.

 

What I find most interesting is the notion of poverty and happiness. Whatever percentage of poverty exists in the Philippines (and the measured standards are far different from Western standards) we all know it's huge. Conversely in the West, people defined as poor often have plenty to eat, a car, cell phone and many items that even a middle class person in PI might not have. How poor are they really?

 

I have to assume that most people who expat or travel extensively in PI do so because they like the land and the people. If money = happiness or poverty = unhappiness, could you really comfortably live in PI? Almost all lovers of PI report that they like the people and that the people appear to be happy. In fact many of us believe that the people appear to be happier than we (Westerners) are.

 

The longer I live and the more money I make as I enter old age, the less happiness I see around me in the US. If Filipinos must by definition be unhappy since they are poor, what's our excuse? Americans have so much, yet often seem so miserable.

 

I suppose the problem is trying to compare objective with subjective reality. A constantly empty stomach is an objective reality; happiness/unhappiness is pretty damn subjective.

 

My Filipina wife (and granted I am a newlywed) is happier than me. She was happier than me when she lived in the Philippines and owned nothing, other than an old, falling apart netbook. She's the one always encouraging me to enjoy things because life is short.

 

Guys here consistently complain about getting hit up for money by the poor relatives. If money really = happiness, these guys should change their tune. After all if you could really make a family happy by coughing up a little cash, why wouldn't you? Answer - it ain't so.

 

It's a complex question: how can someone be happy with so little? How can someone be unhappy with so much?

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but then again if it was a first class country many of us would not be living here and those pretty girls would hold out for the young guys with money

 

That has got to be the greatest line ever in more ways than one to describe the expat-filipina dynamic.  That applies to 95% of expats living in the PI. Oh my what would all you do if it wasn't so poor. haha

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Brucewayne

 

 

The literacy rate in the Philippines is a decent 92.6%

 

You mean the official literacy rate.

I know a lot of children who don't attend school, can't read and their whole families can't read.

We sent a few of the wife's nephews and nieces to public school and they didn't learn to read at all before the 3rd or 4th grade and 8 years later, they can't read a lick, but all are in high schoolor have a high school diploma.

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As one's disappointments in life are usually derived from not achieving or acquiring one's expectations, so "happiness" or the lack thereof, oft comes from the same source.  Seeing others and declaring that they are "happy" or "unhappy" is really a judgement made by the viewer based on what he thinks happiness is or isn't.  Which could lead to a discussion of is anyone really "happy" for more than a few moments in life?  I offer the point of view for your consideration; it is quite acceptable to be just OK.  Need one be deliriously ecstatic 24/7? Or can it be alright to just live in relative peace and be content with what one has and not quest for parades and marching bands and ear to ear smiles which fade?  Personally, I think having an OK day, an OK life is not such a bad thing.  I've lived here in the Phils for over 3 years and yes there are many, many things which need are not up to "western standards" and should be, could be improved.  But to cast an opinion or judgement of whether "happy" is the level that all the denizens should be raised to is to impose my standards on them.  That seems to be a bit egotistic and unfair.

Just my opinion.

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JohnFromTexas

big mistake was wanting U.S. to get out of this place. if we could rebuild Germany and japan by 1959 or so this place would be fantastic. but then again if it was a first class country many of us would not be living here and those pretty girls would hold out for the young guys with money or have a good paying job with a german or Japanese company if the government would go with the flow everybody wins. sorta like poster said about henry ford giving good wage which brings up the standard of living. when I was over in Vietnam in 1969 it was cleaner and more modern than the Philippines now.

 

 

 

 

There's been a movement building for statehood due to the inept response of Haiyan... of course too many people who wouldn't support it for it to happen... and way too late... if you wanted to become a US state, 50 years ago was the time not today... you'll just be joining the US' problems.

 

 

The literacy rate in the Philippines is a decent 92.6%

 

 

The poverty rate is 26.5%

 

There's a difference between being able to read and being educated.  My wife has an above average education for the philippines (some college) and can read well... zero interest in doing so though...  and you need to be able to do more than read, write and do basic math to have a real education that gets you somewhere in live... that level is just survival.

Edited by JohnFromTexas
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Unquestionably they are happy people. I picked up my bolo and joined the road clearing crew early morning after the typhoon. They took it in their stride and got stuck in. Reminded me of back in Japan. I sat by candlelight at night wondering what the hell to do. But many sat out partying enjoying the moonlight. I think they have bounced back remarkably well.

 

I don't know about the figures but for sure many have money problems because they just can't handle it. I'm pleased to help someone with the right attitude. If someone knocks on the gate asking for work I will try to help. Someone that takes something off the sari sari shelf saying, "He will pay for it" is another story.

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Brucewayne

I'd say it is more like 50% not 25% that are so poor, they cannot be sure of taking care of basic elementals. Trying to make out that just because you are living as an extended family in a series of elevated shacks with no electricity and no services you are going to be happy, is just ridiculous.

 

only pampered, privileged and blind foreigners cold possibly make such a case.

 

I'm pretty sure about the bottom 50% of Filipinos. I know where they are. It is the top 50%, I cannot put my finger on quite so easily.

 

I do see your point and agree to it up to a point, but poor can be happy, just like wealthy can be happy.

It depends more on a person's outlook on life than it does on money or material things (or the lack thereof).

Money makes most anyone happy to varying degrees, but that wears off if the person is discontented with life in general.

If you aren't happy with yourself, you will never be happy, no matter what happens in your life and if you have a good outlook, you can see the positive in a lot of things and be happy no matter how poor you may be.

Actual wealth should not be measured by how much cash one has.

I have seen some very poor people who are very happy and yes, money would make them happier, but if they aren't greedy, they are less likely to dwell on accumulating wealth for the sake of happiness.

Edited by Brucewayne
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