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Why Do 1.4 Million Americans Work At Walmart, With Many More Trying To?


Salty Dog

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Salty Dog
By Doug Altner, Forbe

 

Observe any hiring center for a new Walmart and you will see thousands of individuals eager to become a Walmart associate. Many already have jobs at fast food restaurants, supermarkets, or other retail stores. LaShawn Ross, 29, worked for McDonald’s and Winn-Dixie before taking a job at a brand new Walmart in Pinellas Park, Florida. Ross aptly summarizes the sentiments of many applicants: “They are huge, so I know there is a huge amount of opportunity.”

 

Yet, a few pundits, policymakers, and activists insinuate that these people should not be excited, but outraged at the company for its wages—and some groups are even calling for protests on Black Friday. Walmart “can easily afford to pay $15 an hour,” says Robert Reich, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at U.C. Berkeley, who is also urging shoppers to “oycott Walmart on the most important sales day of the year, November 29.” “Their net income was $17 billion,” says Vincent Orange, a D.C. city councilman who voted to force Walmart to pay a minimum wage of $12.50 per hour in the nation’s capital, adding, “You don’t want to share a little bit with the citizens? Come on.” OUR Walmart—a union-backed activist group—accuses the company of showing disrespect to its employees because it doesn’t pay so-called living wages.

 

Well, nobody has to work at Walmart if he feels underpaid or under-appreciated. He can always seek another job. So why do 1.4 million Americans choose to work at Walmart, many for well under $12 per hour?

 

Many entry-level Walmart jobs consist of comparatively safe and non-strenuous work such as stocking shelves, working cash registers, and changing price labels. Walmart also pays competitive wages, which, for these jobs, are generally under $12 per hour, because these positions require little or no work experience or technical skills. For anyone with modest credentials, these jobs provide good work experience— experience which they can use to eventually land a higher paying job.

 

Listen to the critics, though, and you’ll hear Walmart portrayed as if it is holding its employees down. But in fact the company offers incredible opportunities for any hard-working, ambitious person who wants to work his way up in retail. Three out of four Walmart store managers started out as hourly associates, and those managers can earn up to $170,000 per year. Some former hourly associates, such as Patricia Curran, have worked their way up to top executive positions. Curran was named by Fortune magazine as one of the 50 most powerful women of 2006. Walmart even encourages associates to complete training courses during fully paid work time and offers raises to associates who complete these courses.

 

Little wonder that when Walmart opens a new store, it’s not uncommon for as many as 10,000 people to apply for just 300 jobs.

 

For Walmart, the pay, opportunities, and perks it offers must serve its goals for long-term growth and profitability. It offers training and development because it judges this to be good business. Such programs reward talent, motivate employees and recruit managers with extensive firsthand knowledge of store operations. With regards to wages, the company pays what it needs to in order to recruit an enormous number of competent and content associates. And it recognizes that it does not make business sense to pay more than it needs to.

 

This is what many Walmart critics detest: the company will not offer higher wages and benefits when it calculates that it will not be good business. According to these critics, every Walmart employee should be paid at least $12-$15 per hour, regardless of the role he fills, regardless of whether he has the skills or experience to justify such a wage, regardless of whether he is a model employee or a slouch, regardless of how many other individuals are willing and able to do his job for less, regardless of whether raising wages will be good for the company’s bottom line. In effect, their premise is that $12+ per hour wages shouldn’t have to be earned or justified; they should be dispensed like handouts

 

Walmart’s relationship with its employees is win-win. Every wage that it pays is one that the employee accepts and a large number of individuals have successfully worked their way up the retail giant. So, let’s stop attacking Walmart for paying market wages.

 

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By Doug Altner, Forbe   Observe any hiring center for a new Walmart and you will see thousands of individuals eager to become a Walmart associate. Many already have jobs at fast food restaurants, su

Start a business, hire people and give them a good wage that you deem as fare.  Stop whining and do something about it.  

and working at walmart beats SM and ayala which have the same Chinese stock but pay their employees 1 dollar an hour 

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broden

i know a lot of people who work or have worked at walmart.. how can i put this for most ..or really just about all of them working at walmart is kind of like eating at denny's.

 

not some place you plan to go but someplace you end up.

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Three out of four Walmart store managers started out as hourly associates, and those managers can earn up to $170,000 per year.

 

please provide proof of any walmart manager making 170k a year

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mactanfamily

Our local Amazon warehouse pays $13 an hour here in NV. Those guys work their ASSES off. 

 

So now some part time 55 year old fat chick who stands around all day is gonna get $15? What planet are these people on?

 

I understand Americas's present Socialist agenda, but paying a wage just because the company can AFFORD to do so does not make it right.

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softail

"I understand Americas' present Socialist agenda, but paying a wage just because the company can AFFORD to do so does not make it right."

 

 

 

Sure, just look what employers with no social conscience has done for the RP, a real success story.

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I had a friend in college about 12 years ago that was making $16/hour at Walmart while I was doing PC Tech Support in a call center for $12/hr.

 

He had been there for a couple years and worked his way up to the head of the furniture section.

 

He was actually having a hard time finding an entry level IT job after college that would offer more money.

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rainymike

I had a friend in college about 12 years ago that was making $16/hour at Walmart while I was doing PC Tech Support in a call center for $12/hr.

 

He had been there for a couple years and worked his way up to the head of the furniture section.

 

He was actually having a hard time finding an entry level IT job after college that would offer more money.

 

I worked in higher ed for many years. There was always a tendency for schools to build sexy new programs like New Media Arts - even if there were only a handful of jobs in that area. My job was in workforce development and whenever I did the analysis, the jobs were not in the programs where the schools wanted to put the new money The good paying and most abundant jobs were not always in the high tech or medical fields. In my home state, it was in programs like truck driving, refinery operators, blue collar work at the shipyard, etc.

 

Nursing was hot for a while, but at the time I'd recommend medical assisting to a lot of students. For the average kid, they could do 4-5 years of nursing to become an RN. It would usually take longer because the number of slots for students were few. Or they could do 1-2 years in medical assisting and get employed right away. Wages were lower than a nurse but it got you into the medical field and income fast. The smart ones then worked on becoming a nurse on the side.

 

I don't think Walmart is such a bad deal for a kid just coming out of school. I don't know about a career there, but it's a good start and lets you bide your time in the hope of finding something better.

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Britishandproud

I work for Walmart in UK there business is called ASDA. Last month I did 183 hours and took home £1,090.

 

The only thing I'm pissed off about the company is they feck you over on contracts. I do 6 days a week and only contracted to 3 days 15 hours a week. So when I'm off sick or holiday, only 15 hours will be payed. But they won't pay unless it's after 3 days of being off.

 

It's not all easy work as they have strict rules and rather have less people in for a 2 man job.

 

Apart from that I don't mind working there for now as it's the people who I work with that make it enjoyable and we all need to make a living.

 

My new manager has worked there for 2 and a half years and worked her way up from being on the counters. It depends on each individual how fast they become higher. But she worked hard and deserved it. 10 - 12 hour shifts a day will catch up on you at some point.

 

A girl on my department has been there 6 months and is training to become section leader but she's quitting because they expect her to do 10-12 hour shifts a day and she has a young kid and doesn't want to miss out a lot on her growing up.

 

I've been there 4 months and already might have a chance of going to train for section leader. as I work hard on all different departments and a few managers recognise it. How do I know they recognise it? They a few have been wanting me to leave my department and work on there's.

 

Night rate pay is £8.80 a hour, day rate is £6.76 a hour.

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I personally know a security manager at a single store, not a region or multiple stores. she makes 100k usd per year. I can believe some managers make 170k

 

as far as the 10-12 hour work day............. that is standard in most "non-government" fields. hell there are many days I would kill for a 10-12 hour day.

 

here is a quote from a favorite movie of mine......... caddy shack

 

Judge Smails: Well, the world needs ditch diggers, too.

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Britishandproud

I personally know a security manager at a single store, not a region or multiple stores. she makes 100k usd per year. I can believe some managers make 170k

 

as far as the 10-12 hour work day............. that is standard in most "non-government" fields. hell there are many days I would kill for a 10-12 hour day.

 

here is a quote from a favorite movie of mine......... caddy shack

 

Judge Smails: Well, the world needs ditch diggers, too.

I do 12 hour shifts at least once a week due to over time. My department I'm lucky to get 5 hours a day. Yesterday was finish after 3 and half hours. That's why I work on different departments to get over time in. 12 hour shifts are nothing to me an could happily do it everyday.
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Salty Dog

 as far as the 10-12 hour work day............. that is standard in most "non-government" fields. 

 

I worked for the government for over 30 years and never got paid overtime. I've worked many a 12-18 hours days and a few 24-36 hours. My last tour I was on call 24/7 for 3 years and yes I was called every single day after normal work hours. My average work week was at least 60 hours a week.

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softail

"I worked for the government for over 30 years and never got paid overtime. I've worked many a 12-18 hours days and a few 24-36 hours. My last tour I was on call 24/7 for 3 years and yes I was called every single day after normal work hours. My average work week was at least 60 hours a week."

 

 

Thank you for your service.......

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I worked for the government for over 30 years and never got paid overtime. I've worked many a 12-18 hours days and a few 24-36 hours. My last tour I was on call 24/7 for 3 years and yes I was called every single day after normal work hours. My average work week was at least 60 hours a week.

 

yes, THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE

 

sorry, but I was referring to the government office workers in DC, not the military, I should have clarified.

 

our military is exprememly overworked and underpaid, exact opposite of the irs, ssa & other agencies

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Kabisay-an gid

Robert Reich, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at U.C. Berkeley, who is also urging shoppers to “oycott Walmart on the most important sales day of the year, November 29.”

Good luck with the boycott, douche bag.

 

I went to Walmart yesterday evening (Thanksgiving), and the enormous parking area was jam-packed, with dozens of customers unable to get a parking spot. I decided to come back at a later date, because I would have hated to see the lines inside.

 

I predict Walmart is going to do quite well today on "Black Friday".

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Skywalker

I would think it would be a pleasure to serve and assist the 'people of Walmart' customers?   :wheel:

 

post-12091-0-73346500-1385712200_thumb.jpg

 

Shop and Awe!

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