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Fragility in infrastructure exposed.


Skywalker

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Skywalker

Still think it's such a great idea to live in the Countryside?

 

What has been demonstrated, very clearly, is how seriously inadequate the power/water supplies are.  And the demonstrable lack of emergency procedures to anticipate and handle such disasters.

 

The number reported dead is around 5000 at the moment, this figure will rise if serious illnesses develop because of sanitation issues, and unburied bodies.

 

It's very clear to me that being in the Countryside with no power, if you are old with very young kids, is tantamount to negligence.  The locals have difficulties with these situations, what chance do westerners have with little or no survival techniques.

 

Something to think about.

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Headshot

Or...you can provide for your own power and water needs and live at least partially off the grid. Having generation and a well available that will at least provide for your necessities is important in this country...regardless of where you live. Those who live right in the middle of Tacloban were in pretty much the same boat as those who lived in the countryside...and often even worse off. With so many structures down, it will be months before utilities are restored...both in the city and in the countryside.

 

If this storm had bulls eyed Cebu City, do you really think the results would have been any different? Think about wind speeds of 200 mph up to 250 mph and what kind of destruction they would cause. Anybody without emergency generation and a well would still be out of power and water...even if their home had survived. For those who live in condos, think about this...the winds are even stronger at elevation. On the 34th floor you would likely have seen winds between 250 mph and 300 mph. How do you think your windows would have fared with that kind of force beating against them?

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JamesMusslewhite

Or...you can provide for your own power and water needs and live at least partially off the grid. Having generation and a well available that will at least provide for your necessities is important in this country...regardless of where you live. Those who live right in the middle of Tacloban were in pretty much the same boat as those who lived in the countryside...and often even worse off. With so many structures down, it will be months before utilities are restored...both in the city and in the countryside.

 

If this storm had bulls eyed Cebu City, do you really think the results would have been any different? Think about wind speeds of 200 mph up to 250 mph and what kind of destruction they would cause. Anybody without emergency generation and a well would still be out of power and water...even if their home had survived. For those who live in condos, think about this...the winds are even stronger at elevation. On the 34th floor you would likely have seen winds between 250 mph and 300 mph. How do you think your windows would have fared with that kind of force beating against them?

This is not even considering the 16-18 foot tidal surge being driven before the storm being pushed several kilometers inland. One only has to look a videos of hurricane "IKE" when it hit Houston in 2008. It leveled Galveston and Baytown where structures and homes were built to US building codes. The "Ike" storm is very close to the size of this Super Typhoon. There would be cargo ships in the SM Mall parking lot right now...

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Skywalker

 

 

On the 34th floor you would likely have seen winds between 250 mph and 300 mph. How do you think your windows would have fared with that kind of force beating against them?

 

33rd floor!  

 

I don't know what performance level they are rated at.  I can tell you that the sliding doors were rattling like crazy during the earthquake, and I was pretty amazed they didn't shatter.

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jtmwatchbiz

 

 

The trouble with people today is, too many think they have to live a certain way. They have to have the house with the picket fence. They have to have the 2.8 kids. They have to have the cars in the garage. Mostly, they have to compete - the Smith's and the Jones'. For me, that is not how I want to live. I have not lived that way, in fact, for many years. I am happy to say that I haven't. I look forward to my days in a hammock, watching the grass grow.

 

 

why...i could almost hear the harmonica in the background while i read this last paragraph :)

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Yep. In fact, I look forward to living "in the countryside". SW, I live in a country now that is, brute honesty here, ages BEHIND the Philippines. 

 

Medical care here is almost non-existent. Okay, maybe not. But, it might as well be, due to the lack of knowledge Khmer doctors have. (I had a bout with cellulitis back in March. It was misdiagnosed by two different Khmer doctors.) Infrastructure is no where near that of the Philippines. The nearest "real" doctors in this country, are about 6 hours (by bus, 4 by car) from here, in Phnom Penh.

 

Electricity, in many areas, is a joke. It took until August for the Chinese to get a coal fired power plant online, near Sihanoukville. Before then, the chances of you having electricity for a solid 24 hours would have been determined by a throw of the dice. Here in Battambang, we have power cuts often enough to where I will be happy to move - as soon as humanly possible.

 

I am now 47 years old. 48 next June (2014). I have lived a full life. I have done most of what I would like to do in this life. Every day from here on out is a bonus, as far as I am concerned.

 

I was in hopes of sorting things out and staying with the mother of my youngest son, Quinn. However, that didn't work out. (Funny, as she recently emailed me, regretting that decision. Seems that happens a lot with Filipinas.) Oh well. Life goes on. I am not going backward.

 

Another woman whom I have known here for some time, has a home and small farm about 30 kilometers from where I currently live. It's a couple hectares, I guess. She had it built while she was working in Malaysia as a ya-ya. She worked hard, saved everything she could, and spent it the best she could on her farm and home.

 

We hooked up and are now working together to finish what she started a few years ago. Anyway, to get to my point... as soon as the next couple of projects are finished, we will be transferring out to the farm. We will live there full time. Figure we will not have a vehicle. We will live 30 kilometers from the nearest medical facility. We will live 100% off grid. We will live day by day.

 

I hope to be laying in a hammock just about every day, drinking coconut water. If I get sick and die there, before I am able to get back to the city for medical care, so what? It was meant to be, as far as I am concerned. I will have no regrets. I certainly do not look at it as though it is negligence in any way. It is my choice. It is my life. If I am happy doing it, then that is all that matters. 

 

The trouble with people today is, too many think they have to live a certain way. They have to have the house with the picket fence. They have to have the 2.8 kids. They have to have the cars in the garage. Mostly, they have to compete - the Smith's and the Jones'. For me, that is not how I want to live. I have not lived that way, in fact, for many years. I am happy to say that I haven't. I look forward to my days in a hammock, watching the grass grow.

 

Hmmmm......no internet ?   Itsa thought.   I have lived now since Aug last year without brainwashing tv.    Great.  I get all info I need on the net. I would miss abit of goss and research at time i would guess.

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thebob

why...i could almost hear the harmonica in the background while i read this last paragraph :)

 

Don't you mean the plink of banjoes

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Still think it's such a great idea to live in the Countryside?

 

What has been demonstrated, very clearly, is how seriously inadequate the power/water supplies are.  And the demonstrable lack of emergency procedures to anticipate and handle such disasters.

 

The number reported dead is around 5000 at the moment, this figure will rise if serious illnesses develop because of sanitation issues, and unburied bodies.

 

It's very clear to me that being in the Countryside with no power, if you are old with very young kids, is tantamount to negligence.  The locals have difficulties with these situations, what chance do westerners have with little or no survival techniques.

 

Something to think about.

 

fwiw, according to the WHO, unburied bodies are not a severe health risk.

 

used to use them instead of sandbags in WW1 to build trenches.

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Knowdafish

 

 

It's very clear to me that being in the Countryside with no power, if you are old with very young kids, is tantamount to negligence.  The locals have difficulties with these situations, what chance do westerners have with little or no survival techniques.   Something to think about.

 

My wife's relatives (going on 4 generations) have lived in "the Countryside" with no power, and with very young kids with very few problems. It is completely "doable" and is even relatively easy to adapt to. They get their water from a spring (rated #1 by the Philippine government for all natural springs on Negros!) that runs 24/7, year round. I see no sign of "negligence". The kids are well fed and taken care of and go to the local schools. Some have sent their kids away to a university when the time comes. The Philippine government makes sure they have access to healthcare and quite a few have Phil Health. All the kids have their shots, as the government nurses frequently makes the rounds (at least yearly). 

 

Would a "foreigner" live the same way? Sure! I have for a few weeks at a time. It's not hard , and is rather pleasant once you get adjusted to it. It definitely is a lot cleaner, quieter, and healthier, than living in a polluted and noisy city. 

 

Quite a few of the locals there are in their 70's, 80's, and even 90's. So I guess it agrees well with them. It is amazing what a healthy diet, clean air, and clean water can do for longevity along with regular exercise (farm work!). 

 

Do the locals there feel deprived? No! A good percentage of them have seen city life and prefer rural living. It is what they are used to and what they enjoy. They feel out of place in a mall or spending "big money" on luxuries, yet most are very happy. 

 

Would a foreigner choose that lifestyle? Some would, but most would not because it is not what they are used to. Most want all the luxuries and all of their necessities or the feel deprived. 

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Skywalker

*sigh*

 

I am talking about when a disaster strikes - not normal day to day living.  Of course the indigenous natives can live the lifestyle they've been brought up with.

 

I am talking about foreigners from the west, who are completely unfamiliar with living in a rural community - townies if you will - who are over 60, on disability (sound familiar?) and have no experience with natural disasters.

 

Paul has mentioned that he will live 30 kilometres away from medical facilities, off the grid.  Fine for him - his choice.  Would that be a wise choice with a young baby on board?  I'm not so sure.

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USMC-Retired

That situation would not even be doable for me.  Where you are unable to get the basic necessities of life.  Unless you were raised growing vegetables and raising animals then it is not doable.  Keeping food for extended periods is ok if all canned or preserved.  However how many do it not that many.  The western mind is different and harder to adapt.  

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Davaoeno

33rd floor!  

 

I don't know what performance level they are rated at.  I can tell you that the sliding doors were rattling like crazy during the earthquake, and I was pretty amazed they didn't shatter.

 

I've been in a Cat 5 hurricane in mexico  and I spent a lot of the time  holding  the box spring off the queen size bed against the sliding glass doors in my bedroom .  Then i looked down and realized i was standing in 6 inches of water - the wind was blowing the rain right through the window air con unit !! 

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