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Bahala Na


hchoate

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 One of the senses of the phrase bahala na is “snap out of it” — focus on surviving. The almost pathological optimism is a survival adaptation, a kind of anodyne against paralyzing despair.

http://pjmedia.com/richardfernandez/2013/11/20/two-storms-two-manias/

 

I covered the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami in Japan, and cannot recall a single laugh. Every nation is resilient in its own way, but there is something different in the Philippines that I have not yet put my finger on. …

http://news.yahoo.com/signs-life-amid-misery-reveal-filipinos-spirit-114515213.html

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thebob

 

 

I covered the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami in Japan, and cannot recall a single laugh. Every nation is resilient in its own way, but there is something different in the Philippines that I have not yet put my finger on. …

 

In Japan "Gaman suru" is used to mean persevere without complaint, and it's considered to be a virtuous national trait.

 

Here humor is a foil for everything.

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rainymike

 

 

In Japan "Gaman suru" is used to mean persevere without complaint, and it's considered to be a virtuous national trait.

 

The 47 Ronin captures that trait. Here in the Philippines, I'm not sure what movie, folklore or myth captures the pinoy mindset. But I've seen the Japanese equivalent in some of the more upwardly mobile working class people here in the Phils.

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ILoveCyrus

The 47 Ronin captures that trait. Here in the Philippines, I'm not sure what movie, folklore or myth captures the pinoy mindset. But I've seen the Japanese equivalent in some of the more upwardly mobile working class people here in the Phils.

 

the 47 Lapu Lapu's?

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thebob
The 47 Ronin captures that trait.

 

The 47 Ronin is more about loyalty, even if it is hopeless.

 

Philippine culture is about taking extremely huge risks on the off chance of success. God, luck and gambling pervade everything.

 

They have a typhoon mentality. Why build for tomorrow when everything you have worked for can be taken away in an instant. It is better to just spend everything now, on a party, and just trust to luck that everything will be OK.

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rainymike

 

 

Philippine culture is about taking extremely huge risks on the off chance of success. God, luck and gambling pervade everything

 

I'd agree that it is commonly observed, but not sure if it truly an element of Filipino culture or just the economic reality that most people live in poverty and are shaped by the culture of poverty. I tend to live in communities of successful Filipinos - those who are upwardly mobile because of their life choices. This group impresses me.

 

My neighbor across the street is a doctor. Her husband is in the merchant marine and he is rarely home. They make the huge sacrifices for their family. Not even close to a devil may care attitude.

 

My neighbor to the left is a businessman who works in Cebu. His wife works days. The kids live with them, are grown up and work call centers at night. Their dad comes home to Davao once in a while. Last time he came home and had a big fit because the kids were not helping to take care of the house to his satisfaction.

 

My partner's uncle is a big businessman in Cebu. He just donated 7 million pesos of family money to hurricane relief efforts. His kids had a hissyfit about that. I'm sure it was good business with some kind of a payoff in the future. But, I think it was also a way for him to insure that his kids got off their asses, worked hard, and realized that their shit also stank like everyone else.

 

I could go on. I see this repeated among a lot of the less affluent parents in the school's PTA. Some really just barely can afford to send their kids to that school. But again the sacrifice and hard work and saving for the future. I saw this in a lot of the filam first generation immigrants in the states as well.

 

So, just my experience that Philippine culture is more complex than meets the eye. LOL ... of course, I can also give you a lot of examples of the described stereotype as well. Partly left Cebu to get away from that side of the family.

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