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Even the Mightiest Tornado Can't Touch This House


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Knowdafish

Interesting, but at what cost? 

 

I would have thought an underground house would have been the 1st choice as compared to the glass "bunker style" shown. 

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Interesting, but at what cost?

 

I would have thought an underground house would have been the 1st choice as compared to the glass "bunker style" shown.

...... yeah, what's with all the glass? I think that would shattered pieces with just a strong wind.
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Well, they do say the glass can withstand a force equivalent to a car being dropped on it, so it isn't regular glass. However, there are things flying around in a tornado that can develop a lot more force than a car being dropped, so who knows if it will withstand an actual tornado. Are any guys here willing to be the guinea pigs inside the first house to take a direct hit by an F5 tornado?

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Once saw a hammer made of glass. It was done to show different types possible.

 

Useless bit of information - glass is not a solid or a liquid - depends on what your definition of is / is.

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Salty Dog

I've always heard it's a liquid. That's why very very old glass windows are thicker at bottom because the glass is flowing slowly down pulled by gravity.

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If you can afford 500K to build a house, you can afford to move the hell out of tornado alley.

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Half Baked

 

 

move the hell out of tornado alley

 

I used to live in Tornado Alley, the Texas panhandle.

 

Some wild, wild nights..... and not just in the backseat!

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I've always heard it's a liquid. That's why very very old glass windows are thicker at bottom because the glass is flowing slowly down pulled by gravity.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass

Behavior of antique glass

The observation that old windows are sometimes found to be thicker at the bottom than at the top is often offered as supporting evidence for the view that glass flows over a timescale of centuries, the assumption being that the glass was once uniform but has flowed to its new shape, which is a property of liquid.[53] However, this assumption is incorrect; once solidified, glass stops flowing. The reason for the observation is that in the past, when panes of glass were commonly made by glassblowers, the technique used was to spin molten glass so as to create a round, mostly flat and even plate (the crown glass process, described above). This plate was then cut to fit a window. The pieces were not, however, absolutely flat; the edges of the disk became a different thickness as the glass spun. When installed in a window frame, the glass would be placed with the thicker side down both for the sake of stability and to prevent water accumulating in the lead cames at the bottom of the window.[54] Occasionally such glass has been found thinner side down or thicker on either side of the window's edge, the result of carelessness during installation.[55]

Mass production of glass window panes in the early twentieth century caused a similar effect. In glass factories, molten glass was poured onto a large cooling table and allowed to spread. The resulting glass is thicker at the location of the pour, located at the center of the large sheet. These sheets were cut into smaller window panes with nonuniform thickness, typically with the location of the pour centered in one of the panes (known as "bull's-eyes") for decorative effect. Modern glass intended for windows is produced as float glass and is very uniform in thickness.

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