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Which Pump To Buy?


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Knowdafish is gonna be pissed. He is an avid ShurFlo guy, and rightfully so. ShurFlo is probably the pump I should go with. But, I recently noticed these pumps for sale and would like some input - even if just observations / guesses from other members here. I mean, it's always good to have the views of others, prior to making a final decision. 

 

Now, my delima.

 

I want to pressurize a rainwater harvesting project, that will supply water for a shower, two sinks, and a bum gun. The toilet will be a "manual flush", using a dipper and pale. (I can't see wasting water simply to refill a tank on the rear of a toilet.)

 

Anyway, I have been looking for pumps on eBay. Here are some I am looking at now. Can you good folk give me some input on what you think, by looking them over? 

 

1. Pump 1

 

2. Pump 2

 

3. Pump 3

 

All are 12vdc. All are by the same company.

Pump 1 is 17 liters per minute at 40psi.

Pump 2 and Pump 3 are both 4.3 LPM at 35psi. (Both are almost identical, in fact.)

 

One of my questions would be, would you buy one of these pumps, over a more reputable pump, given the choice? The company claims they have ample spare parts, if necessary. I would buy some ahead of time, anyway. This pump would be the sole pump on the farm, for providing water needs from the harvesting tanks. Granted, it isn't a life threatening situation if the pump fails. It would be, however, a pain in the ass. No pun intended there. 

 

I had considered buying the higher pressure / higher volume pump, and piping it in to move water from one tank to another, if necessary, as well as to provide back up for the water supply for the house water system. 

 

Also, please keep in mind that, in the future (not too near), I will add solar hot water, and will need a pump for that. I am considering a thermosiphon system for that. When completed, the water heater will be piped similar to the image below:

 

water-system.jpg

 

So, anyone want to offer some input, please, prior to me making a final decision on this? The toilet will be completed in about 10 days, if all goes as planned. I will need the pump shortly afterward. 

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Headshot

Farm? You're living on a farm? Are you going to be a farmer?  :cool:

 

On pumps, I would stick with quality name brands. The off-brands may tell you they have plenty of spare parts now, but will they still have them in a year or so when you need them?

Edited by Headshot
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tobster

Let me know which way you are going to go on that as I have been looking at them also so I can have good pressure in the garden to water and wash the cars and bikes.

 

Also how will you power it and will you use a type of pressure switch to activate the pump...

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Also how will you power it and will you use a type of pressure switch to activate the pump...

 

Read the information about the pumps  at the links Paul provided

 

"Built-in pressure switch, to automatically turn on and off as you turn your tap or nozzle on and off"

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Let me know which way you are going to go on that as I have been looking at them also so I can have good pressure in the garden to water and wash the cars and bikes.

 

Also how will you power it and will you use a type of pressure switch to activate the pump...

 

Toby, these little pumps are completely automatic. They have built in pressure switches that determine when they run. They are 12vdc. Typically, they are require no more than a 10 ampere fused circuit. I believe Pump 1, above, requires a 15 ampere circuit, which is a bit above average. 

 

Personally, I am leaning toward Pump 1, due to the volume it delivers. Realistically, I should probably be looking at Pumps 2 or 3, though. 17 liters versus 4.3 is a huge difference when it comes to taking a shower and conserving water.

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Knowdafish

 

 

Knowdafish is gonna be pissed. He is an avid ShurFlo guy, and rightfully so. ShurFlo is probably the pump I should go with.

 

I'm not pissed. :baseballbat:  I've had many a customer who wouldn't listen to reason. :notallthere:  :D   People are people and they will make their own decisions, but.......

 

I would stick with ShurFlo because I know they are extremely reliable and the cost of them is not extreme (is it?). Flo-jet would be my next choice as they are 2nd only to Shurflo, and lastly Sealand which is made (or imported?) by a Dometic subsidiary and an unproven pump.

 

I like Shurflo because of their proven reliability; their excellent factory service; readily available parts; and ease of repair. They are also the 1st pump manufacturer on the block (after ITT / Jabsco) as far as compact RV and boat water pumps go. Flojet is a late comer relatively and Sealand is still wet behind the ears. As long as you can get one without a huge hassle in shipping costs or availability worries I would stick with them. The other things is that they are extremely quiet. Flojets are noisier and I have not heard a Sealand (I think that is what the last two pumps you posted are?) pump to be able to offer my opinion on its noise level. 

 

ShurFlo has sold 100's of thousands of pumps since the 1960's if not over a million. Flojet? Not! Sealand? Not even close! 

 

No matter which one you get I would get either a replacement pump head or at least a rebuild kit at the same time to save on freight cost and possible freight delays down the road, or if you are feeling wealthy you could keep a complete extra pump on hand.

 

This would completely eliminate the possibility that they obsolete your chosen pump 10 years down the road and parts are NLA. 

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I reckon you are the voice of reason. 

 

Not to mention, I think you told me about a 4 gpm ShurFlo, in a PM not long ago?

 

Now that I think about it, I really should go with the most reliable pump I can. After all, this is going to be the sole means of providing water for the house.

Edited by Paul
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Knowdafish

 

 

I really should go with the most reliable pump I can. After all, this is going to be the sole means of providing water for the house.

 

Bingo!  :thumbsup:

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But, to be on the safe side, buy a complete head assembly as well, juuuuuuuuuust in case. Murphy does love me, after all.

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Knowdafish

2.0 GPM is the rated open flow without ANY restrictions such as piping. You will be lucky to get 1.0 - 1.5 GPM restricted flow through your piping, just so you know. 

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Yeah, I just don't know how much water pressure I need for a good shower and my trusty ol' bum gun.

 

But, I have to balance water conservation and volume / pressure at some point. The question is, where, exactly, is that point?

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Knowdafish

Be sure and install a bladder tank so the pump does not constantly cycle on and off when a fixture is opened only part way. It will even out the flow, especially when taking a shower (bidet style or otherwise).

 

Low flow shower heads are rated in the same range as the pump you posted, and most suck if you want a decent shower. There are a few shower heads that compensate for low flow that do give a decent shower though. I doubt they are available in the Philippines or even outside the U.S. though. 

 

A slightly higher rated pump and a bladder tank would be the hot ticket for a nice shower. 

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Knowdafish, are RVs piped to prevent water hammers? I mean, I realize the pressure switch stops the pump. But, would you still suffer a water hammer if closing a valve too quickly? Should I pipe the plumbing to prevent that? 

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Knowdafish

Knowdafish, are RVs piped to prevent water hammers? I mean, I realize the pressure switch stops the pump. But, would you still suffer a water hammer if closing a valve too quickly? Should I pipe the plumbing to prevent that? 

 

The only water hammering I have experienced in R.V.'s have, for the most part, been those with copper or galvanized piping. I think that plastic piping flexes just enough with the pressure to relieve it. 

 

If you use a bladder tank (ShurFlo has them) then you can be 100% assured that you will not experience any water hammering. 

 

If on a budget, just try everything without the bladder tank. It can be added later, as can any number of specialized fittings that prevent water hammering. Water hammering in my experience is a rare occurrence and I wouldn't worry about it. 

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