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Hey all,

 

I'm a newbie here. A Kiwi ex-pat married to a Filipina and we are living in Cebu city.

 

I've been trying (very informally) to learn Visaya for years and don't seem to be getting very far. So  now that I'm living here I'd live to get some lessons in conversation to prompt me to converse more in Visaya/Cebuano.

 

I keep reading that Angie is the person all knowledgeable on this topic. So maybe Angie can help me out?

 

I basically want to do 3-4 hours a week of mainly conversation lessons in the afternoons or early evenings (like 2 hours twice a week). Terms and pay are negotiable. It's not too seryuso...just for fun, keep the brain ticking and so I can be a bit more immersed in local culture here.

 

If anyone knows a teacher with some experience teaching Visaya could you kindly post here or email me on xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx (email removed)

 

 

Cheers...

 

Painter

Edited by Paul
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Mate, Angie, I am afraid, passed away some time back.

 

Welcome to the forum, though. 

 

Please read the rules, prior to posting, as a new member. Rules here may be a bit different than other forums you are on?

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Jim Sibbick

 

 

I'm ....... married to a Filipina and we are living in Cebu city.

 

You have a live in teacher already. I am sure you have already learnt some words and phrases without thinking about it.

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Half Baked

I've learned that, along with being American, I'm part "Bastos", too. Ay Jusko! (sp)

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Thanks for your reply Paul. I guess that wasn't the best introduction post then. Sorry to hear that Angie passed on.

Yes Jim I know quite a lot of Visayan words already and my wife helps but I can't seem to get conversant, so my thinking is some conversation lessons from a language teacher would help.

 

There is a place in Ayala called Speedtalk. Anyone had any dealings with them?

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Just for the record, I am also looking for a language teacher.

 

While a wife or GF would be able to translate words and sentences, it would take a proper teacher to explain grammar and structure - the inner workings of the language.

 

I see there are some advertising online, on Sulit and the like, but doubt if they are any good.

 

It also does not help that no comprehensive books about the language seem to exist.

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Headshot

The first thing you should learn is that the central islands of the Philippines are called the Visayas. The major first language spoken in the area is Bisayan. Angie taught me that. There are several different dialects of Bisayan, and it is the most commonly spoken first language in the Philippines. Cebuano is one of those dialects. While everyone is required to learn Tagalog (mostly as a second language), it is actually spoken as a first language by far fewer than those who speak Bisayan as their first language. I went to Angie's funeral when she passed. For all of the expats who had been helped by her, their were surprisingly few of us at her funeral.

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I spent a year learning Cebuano from Angie before I went to Cebu and when there she would constantly talk to me in Cebuano which made me mad and in reflection showed me to be a little bit stupid because I have come to the realisation that the best way to learn a language is full immersion.   The need to understand communication got in the way of the need to learn the language because I would often revert to English to get the understanding when I should have struggled with Cebuano to get the language.   Full immersion forces you to work at the language in order to get what is said to you, reverting to English continually undermines the learning.   The big buzz came for me was when walking back from Angie's place after dinner through the rabbit warren of pathways to the main road to catch a jeepney back to my hotel and conversing with Angie in Cebuano I realised what was happening and felt part of the place and not so much a stranger. 

 

Using flash cards can be a big help.  You write the words or phrases you want to learn and memorise them.  Carry them around with you while you wait at the bank or BI office and use them. 

 

If ever I got the opportunity to go back to the Philippines I would  stay somewhere where English is not spoken and avoid all English speakers for at least 3 months or more and insist that only Cebuano be spoken to me in order to get my head into the language.    I would learn the same way as any Cebuano kid learns his/her language its only after they can speak Cebuano that they go to school and .... heck its not an official language so there is no formalised structure taught for it that I know of.  They pick up the grammer and structure through use and I believe even Cebuano/Visayan speakers don't always get them right.   You will find regional differences and realise Cebuano becomes Visaya and becomes something else depending on where you travel.

 

Spelling, the "i" becomes "e" and the "o" for "u" the spelling interchange can drive you crazy but never seems to bother Filipinos no wonder they are so good at languages, they have this flexible attitude.   And that is the clue to the Filipino language it's adaptable and flexible like any working language worth its salt .

 

I wouldn't worry about the grammer and structure I tried that route and it doesn't work if you are looking for a working language you can use to communicate with the people around you.   You waste so much time in your head translating and then its translating the formal language in your head while the average Filipino is using their own version of a working language which can be different from the formal structure.  They didn't go to college or school to learn a formal Cebuano so don't know what that would be.  If you want to speak like a native then learn the language the natives speak the way they learnt.   Learn vocabulary and then see how they use it.   Learn the vocabulary they are using.  Later you can make sense of it all comparing to English if you want to.  How many of us know the structure and grammer of English or think structure and grammer while conversing with one another.  

 

Old age and lack of use has made any gains in Cebuano I had then disappear, my memory is even having problems remembering English words but I still have a good working knowledge of English because I am fully immersed in it here.  

 

There are books and courses around some are even sold through this site if you want to "study" the language.   My poor advice would be to learn the vocab and structure your girlfriend/wife uses as you do want to communicate with her and the locals around rather than the "educated" Cebuanos living somewhere else who you will probably rarely meet.  

 

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SkyMan

Hey all,

 

I'm a newbie here. A Kiwi ex-pat married to a Filipina and we are living in Cebu city.

 

I've been trying (very informally) to learn Visaya for years and don't seem to be getting very far. So  now that I'm living here I'd live to get some lessons in conversation to prompt me to converse more in Visaya/Cebuano.

 

I keep reading that Angie is the person all knowledgeable on this topic. So maybe Angie can help me out?

 

I basically want to do 3-4 hours a week of mainly conversation lessons in the afternoons or early evenings (like 2 hours twice a week). Terms and pay are negotiable. It's not too seryuso...just for fun, keep the brain ticking and so I can be a bit more immersed in local culture here.

 

If anyone knows a teacher with some experience teaching Visaya could you kindly post here or email me on xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx (email removed)

 

 

Cheers...

 

Painter

We are planning on having a Cebuano class in Liloan a couple times a week and are looking for a few more interested folks before we start.  I'm also busy with a drilling operation and relief efforts so it may be a few weeks before we start.  I think you can PM me (anyone else interested too) because I'm a Mod and I'll give you more details on how it will work.

 

You have a live in teacher already. I am sure you have already learnt some words and phrases without thinking about it.

Many have tried, most have failed.  SOs are great for teaching pronunciation or telling you when you're wrong, but they can't tell you why you're wrong and fix may be something completely different because they have never been taught their own language.  Imagine an English speaking child who has not yet had an English class and you ask them if it's ok to say "I can't not speak well" and if not why not?  The best answer they could give is that it sounds wrong.  That's an answer I frequently get from my wife.  As a simple example you might notice that maayo means good and buntag means morning, so why do they say Maayo'ng Buntag?  She will say, because it sounds right or because that's what we say.  That's fine if you want to just learn the phrase but you're not really learning the language.  In a different situation if you had 2 words would you know whether to put a nga ('ng) in between or not?  Phrase learning is a good start but it isn't learning the language and don't expect Cebuanos to use only the phrases you happen to know.

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Monsoon

Once you have a basic grasp of the language (any language) submersion is the best. My wife and I speak Tagalog at home for the most part as neither of us need to practice our English. My tagalog abilities grew exponentially within the first 6 months of us doing this. This is how you learn language as a baby. 

 

I learned most of my Cebuano by talking to bartenders and our maids. The problem with the former method is recall can be an issue and often requires repeated lessons on the same subject. 

Edited by Monsoon
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I learned most of my Cebuano by talking to bartenders and our maids. The problem with the former method is recall can be an issue and often requires repeated lessons on the same subject.

Hehe, repeated lessons in the bar, that does not sound like the healthiest means of education...

Maybe try San Might Light instead of Red Horse :-)

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  • 1 month later...

There is a language centre at Banilad Town Centre. (BTC )

It is cheaper if there are 4 people who are prepared to enrol and learn as a group.

 

I am interested if 3 others want to join in

 

PM me if interested

 

Alternately if anyone has lessons planned or a good teacher , please let me know

 

Cheers.

 

Al

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I took lessons online for a couple years through an experienced teacher who teaches Peace Corps volunteers from other countries when the arrive in the Philippines. Anyone who is interested can PM me and I will pass on her contact info.  

 

Learning the language from a wife or gf is like eating soup with a fork. You really need a teacher who knows how to give a good foundation to build on rather than capturing phrases every now and then. As I've posted before, If you're not into it, don't even bother. It takes time. If you don't keep refreshing your brain with a new language, you'll quickly forget most of what you learn.  

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I've learned that, along with being American, I'm part "Bastos", too. Ay Jusko! (sp)

I'm sure none of the good people here in Leyte find me "bastos" but "guapo" instead. :angel:

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