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Cable lube?


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SkyMan

I need to put a new throttle cable on my truck and I'm wondering what kind of lube I should use. I have a bottle of Singer oil that I think would be good, comes in a squirt bottle. Would that be a good choice?

 

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Edited by SkyMan
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jtmwatchbiz

i think most new cables are pre-coated with lube so maybe check. depending on if you can pull out enough of the steel cable from the jacket, i would be tempted to use something a bit thicker like light grease if it's possible to get it on the steel or inside the plastic jacket..  

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Can you get graphite, TJ? 

 

I'm not sure what "Singer oil" is.

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SkyMan

Singer, of sewing machine fame, "Protect and lubricate sewing machines, door hinges, bicycles, motors and appliances in general."

 

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Oh, a light machine oil? 

 

I would definitely go with something like Graphite, if you can find it.

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jtmwatchbiz

Cooking oil is what they used when they changed mine.

 

 

while any kind of lubricant could be used, in this tropical climate the thicker the better. super low viscosity oil such as singer sewing machine oil or cooking oil may be easy to apply as it flows quite readily, but that same easy flow causes it to exit the cable prematurely. for a highly active throttle cable, as opposed to low use cables such as ventilation controls, hand brake, etc. its important to keep the lube where it's needed. the tough part is getting the lube inside. if the cable can be partially slid out of it's plastic sheath then thick lube can be applied to the steel and worked in. another option is some motorcycle shops stateside have cable oilers, which pneumatically force grease into the cable. i don't know if there is such tools here in cebu city. perhaps it may be worth a check at some motorcycle shops?  

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Ifr you want to borrow a simple manual cable oiler i have one. Also take note, lube for cables depends specifically on the sheath the actual cable runs in. Some sheaths are nylon, teflon, plastic or wound steel.

Applying a light oil to a teflon sheath can actually cause swelling of the sheath which results in cable bind.

Different sheathing requires different lube and teflon runs best dry.

So it is not just a case of force oil down its neck!!!

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SkyMan

 

 

I would definitely go with something like Graphite, if you can find it.
I think you're right but not sure how easy it would be to find and I think it normally comes in a tube which would be hard to get in the sleeve. 

 

the tough part is getting the lube inside. if the cable can be partially slid out of it's plastic sheath then thick lube can be applied to the steel and worked in. another option is some motorcycle shops stateside have cable oilers, which pneumatically force grease into the cable. i don't know if there is such tools here in cebu city. perhaps it may be worth a check at some motorcycle shops?
You're right, getting it inside is the hard part.  Even putting it on the cable and working it is difficult.  What the locals do using motor or cooking oil is to push the end of the cable including the sleeve through the bottom of a small plastic bag and then sealing it to the sleeve with a rubber band or a string. Then they put oil in the bag and work the cable.  I used the Singer oil.  This cable has a rubber dust gasket at each end so I shouldn't lose too much oil.
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SkyMan

Ifr you want to borrow a simple manual cable oiler i have one. Also take note, lube for cables depends specifically on the sheath the actual cable runs in. Some sheaths are nylon, teflon, plastic or wound steel.

Applying a light oil to a teflon sheath can actually cause swelling of the sheath which results in cable bind.

Different sheathing requires different lube and teflon runs best dry.

So it is not just a case of force oil down its neck!!!

It's wound steel unless there is Teflon inside it.  The cable only cost ₱150 so if I screwed up I can get another.

Edited by SkyMan
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What about some chain lube,  I think it is thin when applied, some part of it evaporates and it becomes like a grease

 

I found this at a hardvare store

 

post-6705-0-61532700-1384612966_thumb.jpg

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I think you're right but not sure how easy it would be to find and I think it normally comes in a tube which would be hard to get in the sleeve. 

 

Actually, you would remove the cable from the Multi-Cab. Then, take the cable from the sleeve and wipe the graphite on it. Put it back in the sleeve, install the completed cable assembly, and you would be good for some time to come.

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Although your system sounds workable Paul, it most likely is impractical due to the swaged or factory crimped end fittings/ nipples fitted to the cable. These will prevent the cable inner being totally withdrawn from the sleeve as you call it.

If indeed you have a cable inside a spiral metal wire sheath, these are fairly simple to lube from my experience. There are plain spiral wound where you can see the tightly wound steel outer or those where the spiral is further encased in a protective black plastic coating.

This system takes overnight. Put about 2" of engine oil no matter what grade 15-30W 10-40W is unimportant in the bottom of a flat bottomed container of decent diameter say12" up. Gently coil the cable up so as to fit in the bottom of your container, it hasnt mattered to date if coils overlap eachother but as flat as poss. If necessary place a heavy object in to keep things flat. Walk away. Give things a bit of a prod or poke every so often. Thats it.

I have found that the oil "wicks" along the spiral wound outer by capillary action.

Well it has worked for me  quite often, but so also has my manual oiler.

I hope this works for you.

Edited by Tinbum
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