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CNN Anderson Cooper covering Typhoon


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SkyMan

I've found that Filipinos are very proud - was just reminded of that just now. Was on a rant with my wife about the customs taxing relief goods and my sis-in-law got defensive saying that these are the rules and besides that it takes time to deliver, etc, etc. Then (shoulda shut my trap) I got onto the deaths (latest reports at 4000+) and said that the big guy shouldn't have put it at just 2000+. Got a earful about that too, "it was just after the typhoon, no one knew how many..."

 

Well, lesson learned - AGAIN! I'm pretty dumb.... :snap:

So very funny.  I went on a relief trip to Bogo, Medellin,  San Remigio, and Daan Bantayan Friday and it was really heartbreaking to see what happened.  I'll probably do a thread about it but on the way back my wife was really upset and wanted to know why the gov't wasn't doing anything and taking so long.  I found myself on the defending side saying it takes time to set major operations like this up and being a third world country they just didn't have a lot to do it with until the other countries started arriving.  But in the back of my mind I really was in total agreement with her.

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Just watched Cooper's response to the criticisms of his reporting.  Thought it was very measured, accurate (in terms of what he was alleged to have said but did not actually say) and fair.  Having wat

one thing I have learnt ,philippinos have a hard time admitting they are wrong sometimes ,pride gets in the way of their rational thinking .so best to just let them think they are right to save gettin

keep their feet to the fire anderson (and all other reporters)!  it's scary to think how slowly things would be going if not for the international coverage.  filipino politicians are not accustomed to

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So very funny.  I went on a relief trip to Bogo, Medellin,  San Remigio, and Daan Bantayan Friday and it was really heartbreaking to see what happened.  I'll probably do a thread about it but on the way back my wife was really upset and wanted to know why the gov't wasn't doing anything and taking so long.  I found myself on the defending side saying it takes time to set major operations like this up and being a third world country they just didn't have a lot to do it with until the other countries started arriving.  But in the back of my mind I really was in total agreement with her.

Without the private sector, the people of northern Cebu would have had very little help by now. You think the Governor of Cebu does not have a spare Php 10,000,000 in the kitty to help?

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ed villas

The one I just saw on his 360 show was about a man dying from a broken leg. At first he got an infection because no antibiotics. Then he had to have surgery and he died because no blood was available.

 

..

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/16/world/asia/dead-of-a-failed-relief-effort-as-much-as-typhoons-winds.html

 

 

Death After the Typhoon: ‘It Was Preventable’ By KEITH BRADSHER

TACLOBAN, the Philippines — Richard Pulga lay on a hard steel gurney for five days with only a saline drip after being seriously injured in the typhoon that devastated his country.

On Friday, Mr. Pulga, 27, died — essentially of a broken leg.

 

Doctors said the father of two small children could have been saved.

Instead, he became a victim of the iincompetance and inaction that have plagued relief efforts here for the hundreds of thousands left injured, or homeless or hungry, and sometimes all three, since the typhoon hit.

By the time Dr. Rodel Flores, a surgeon with a team of visiting doctors, found Mr. Pulga on Thursday, he had received no antibiotics or antiseptic and his leg was badly infected. The doctor ordered an emergency amputation to try to save his life. But the surgery was too late, and death soon followed.

 

“In short,” Dr. Flores said, “it was preventable.”

 

Mr. Pulga was one of the first victims of Typhoon Haiyan to be brought to the top government hospital in the city. He was there because he had tried to protect his home, sending his family to a safer place as some of the highest typhoon winds ever recorded slammed into his island. Those winds sent a coconut rocketing through the darkness into his leg, shattering it.

His death is one of the clearest signs yet of the human toll taken by a slow and troubled relief effort since the typhoon swept ashore on Nov. 8. Like much-needed water and food, medicine — including antibiotics — was held up for days as rescue teams struggled to operate amid the chaos of a city with too few military or police officers to provide security and too little government control.

Aid workers huddled for days at the airport, unable to obtain vehicles or fuel and fearful of venturing out amid reports of sporadic gunfire as desperate people nearly hijacked one convoy approaching Tacloban, which turned back. Some of those workers have since said the inadequate government response has made this disaster more difficult in some ways than such historic catastrophes as the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004.

By Friday, a full week into the disaster, aid had finally begun to flow more smoothly, in part because of help from better-equipped foreign militaries. Field hospitals had begun to be set up, but as with the Indian Ocean disaster, aid workers worried that infections from lacerations would claim many more lives.

 

For Mr. Pulga’s family, the loss is catastrophic. A farmer, Mr. Pulga was one of the few men in his extended family able to earn money. In his final days, as he spoke with a reporter from The New York Times, it was that thought that consumed him.

On Friday, his widow, Marycris, wept next to his covered corpse in a hallway at St. Paul’s Hospital here, a private hospital the surgeons transferred him to in the last-ditch effort to save him.

 

After initially being too traumatized to visit, she had arrived in time for his surgery.

“I want to bring him home,” she said Friday, “but we have no home left.”

Mr. Pulga arrived at the first hospital, Eastern Visayas Regional Medical Center, shortly after the storm swept through.

The hospital had been partly swamped with seawater, losing electricity and most of its medical supplies. In his time there, Mr. Pulga received virtually no care.

When his wound began leaking blood during the interview on Wednesday, two workers in orange Philippines Department of Health vests

 

removed the blood-caked, four-day-old bandage,

 

showed the wound briefly to a government doctor, then secured the same bandage with gauze to stop the bleeding.

 

The hospital was running low on antiseptics, antibiotics and painkillers; Mr. Pulga received none. It was unclear why the hospital’s triage team did not make him a higher priority.

 

Luminada Florendo, Mr. Pulga’s aunt, said on Wednesday     :rofl: that a doctor had suggested she take him home :shitbricks:

because she had no money for the treatment he would need; the doctor left before he could be interviewed.

 

When the visiting medical team from Davao in the southern Philippines showed up a day later, the doctors concluded that Mr. Pulga was the sickest person in the hospital and ordered that he be transferred to St. Paul’s. Dr. Mauri Bravo III, one of the surgeons who performed the amputation, said the wound had a distinctive fruity smell of infection. Mr. Pulga’s eyes were turning yellow, and his abdomen was distended. Doctors found no sign of lower-back injury, another possible cause of abdominal pain.

Virginia Ausa, a nurse at Eastern Visayas Regional, said that no one there had been aware that Mr. Pulga had been interviewed by an international news organization and that he had not been singled out for special treatment for this reason by the Davao team. Dr. Flores said the same.

 

As the doctors prepared Mr. Pulga for surgery on Thursday, it became clear that he was suffering from septicemia and that his body’s ability to produce red blood cells was dwindling.

But on Friday his body began to shut down, partly because the hospital’s blood bank had been destroyed, so he could not receive a needed transfusion before surgery. By late morning, he was dead.

 

Dr. Flores said the bill for his care would most likely be covered by the Philippines Department of Health.

When told the story of Mr. Pulga’s final days, Mayor Alfred S. Romualdez — who has been widely accused by residents of mounting an insufficient relief response — was quick to deflect criticism, saying Eastern Visayas Regional has long been “a problem.”

Dr. Albert de Leon, the hospital’s chief administrator, said malnutrition and other unsuspected weaknesses in people like Mr. Pulga sometimes made them hard to save. “There is a supreme being who decides the fate of every one of us,” he said.

When told of Mr. Romualdez’s criticisms, Dr. de Leon launched into such an angry outburst that another doctor rushed over to calm him. Dr. de Leon said that his hospital was an excellent teaching and research institution and that the mayor should do much more to organize typhoon relief.

 

“We are in his city, and yet he is not doing that — even the garbage disposal, he doesn’t do anything,” Dr. de Leon raged in a hospital corridor that was growing dark at sunset and still had no electricity.

At St. Paul’s Hospital, a security guard told Mr. Pulga’s wife that her husband’s body would have to be buried in a mass grave if she could not remove it. 

She had no vehicle to transport it and sobbed for more than an hour, refusing to make a decision.

Dr. Flores and Dr. Bravo gave a lengthy interview in the hospital parking lot about Mr. Pulga’s last days

. Dr. Bravo then went upstairs to the steel bed where Mr. Pulga’s body had been.

It was empty. No one seemed to know where the corpse or the bereaved had gone.

 
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If that doesnt horrify everyone, it should do.

 

Sadly, nothing will change in the Philippines, and the same thngs will keep happening.

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sandwindstars

Just to the record straight Andrew Steven interviewed Mar Roxas

 

 

So it's plausible that Roxas was right and Stevens was wrong but the web site called Roxas on his arrogance?

 

 

 

Yes, it's plausible Andrew Steven read it wrong.  I don't watch CNN but have seen ITV clip of another interview with Roxas, he did come out defensive, arrogant and came out with a political remark against the mayor of Tacloban.  The same with Pres. Aquino, he is a very good speaker, but in other local news, he tends to lash out local gov't units in public.  There's a lot of politicking going around I'm afraid.  IMHO, they are peeved because their "warlike preparation" and "zero casualty" objective just got thrashed by woman who knows no fury, Ms. Yolanda.

 

Although I'm not a fan of Anderson Cooper and CNN, don't even have it on my cable, I think they are doing a "public" service to the ordinary Filipinos by showing see the incompetence of the elected officials.  Just check the twitter messages I've seen from Filipinos on the ground.

 

It was a logistics nightmare from day 1.  But, there are people on the ground that we don't hear of, but have found a way around some of the challenges. Like the Mayor of Coron who got the word out re her islands on Euronews when her own area was thrashed.  Or a lady in Boracay who would text her husband somewhere far away and post the updates on Trip Advisor.  PH Red Cross had been ferrying goods by land since Nov 11 on their own.  Individual community/social/civic groups volunteers have made their way to the stricken areas.  Air 21 apparently brought its own equipment (communication I believe) to start the ball rolling in Tacloban airport; the US military to install equipment for night flying; the domestic airlines ferrying goods in and passengers out on their own.  And the expat community here who have been out and about doing their bit. Where is the organization and coordination by the national gov't?

 

Again, no fan of Anderson but he's done a public service.

Edited by sandwindstars
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johnormoc

i think what the world is seeing now is just how inept the government of the philippines is in general.. maybe they suspected it,  maybe they heard about it, but now they actually see it and i think most are appalled.  its not cooper's or anybody else's fault that the light they are shining happens to expose the degree of ineptness that is already present there.  they had no ability to know what that light would expose beforehand.   if someone thinks aquino or any other government official should not be challenged then maybe they have a problem with the concepts of democracy and free press.     maybe now with all the attention focused on them in such an international way their own people will push for changes.   things are bad... but maybe there is opportunity here for the philippines if they can just stop being so sensitive and reluctant to engage in confrontation.

Bullseye!

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i think what the world is seeing now is just how inept the government of the philippines is in general.. maybe they suspected it,  maybe they heard about it, but now they actually see it and i think most are appalled.  its not cooper's or anybody else's fault that the light they are shining happens to expose the degree of ineptness that is already present there.  they had no ability to know what that light would expose beforehand.   if someone thinks aquino or any other government official should not be challenged then maybe they have a problem with the concepts of democracy and free press.     maybe now with all the attention focused on them in such an international way their own people will push for changes.   things are bad... but maybe there is opportunity here for the philippines if they can just stop being so sensitive and reluctant to engage in confrontation.

 

I agree with you 100%, I always have hope for, and confidence in, the people of the Philippines.  However, in my opinion, having a rich Western "reporter" finger wagging an Asian head of state is unproductive.  I think the Philippine people are smart enough to see how the years of neglect and coruption surrounding the infrastructure contributed to the inadequate response to the tragedy and mistakes were made but lessons can be learned.  It's easy to be critical but as Aristotle said, “To avoid criticism say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.” 
 
I believe we all have separate realities and are all entitled to our opinions, although some seem to take mine personally.  These are my opinions, I won't try to change other's opinion and, hopefully, people won't try to change mine and try not to take it personally. 
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USCebuana

I'm not defending Aquino but do you guys think that a US president, a Bush, an Obama or a Clinton could have done better given the same circumstances and resources? IMO I think Clinton would do a better job but not Bush or Obama.

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USCebuana

On Cooper's show I see people just standing around doing nothing. Why are the officials not  hiring these people to clear the roads, collect bodies, set up feeding centers, etc. The barangays themselves, why don't they clear the roads for relief trucks to use or provide a secure space for a helicopter to land with supplies? One of the main issues why aid wasn't delivered was because of security and access. These are things that should be done on a local level. If you wait for the aid group or the national government to do this for you, you will starve.

Edited by USCebuana
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interesting post , the comments are VERY EYE OPENING,

thankfully its on that post not on this forum

as it would already be deleted or made invisible

 

http://www.philstar.com/opinion/2013/11/17/1257685/cooper-said-nothing-new-post-yolanda

"Another reason why the foreign media are given preferential attention is that colonial-minded Filipino officials are still beholden to fair-skinned parachute journalists"

 

I think this sums the whole article.

 

The author could change his name to snow white and wear a jump suit and his credibility would still remain incredible.  

 

Reality is that CNN has breadth more credibility on the local and international stage than the author. Why? because of the author !!His track record is more than woeful, a Max Soliven....NOT!! even if it is the same broadsheet.

 

Wonder how the comment would have been if Mr Anderson had been of Blacks extraction?

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USCebuana

I have the feeling that reporting by the media is a mile wide but an inch deep. They do not explain the complexities under the headlines. Probably because it's boring and the more sensational it is the higher the ratings. 

 

I saw the mayor of Tacloban on CNN relating his adventures in his beach house during the storm. The reporter never asked what he was doing on a beach resort during a Category 5 storm with predicted storm surges. It seems promoting irresponsibility to me. 

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USCebuana

"Another reason why the foreign media are given preferential attention is that colonial-minded Filipino officials are still beholden to fair-skinned parachute journalists"

 

I think this sums the whole article.

 

The author could change his name to snow white and wear a jump suit and his credibility would still remain incredible.  

 

Reality is that CNN has breadth more credibility on the local and international stage than the author. Why? because of the author !!His track record is more than woeful, a Max Soliven....NOT!! even if it is the same broadsheet.

 

Wonder how the comment would have been if Mr Anderson had been of Blacks extraction?

I like the term "parachute journalists". I hope they don't forget the other hard hit areas. 

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