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What type of generator to buy........


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Mandingo

It looks like the generator at my place is underpowered for what the needs of the family are. With them being in Ormoc and having no electric for at least a couple weeks, and us being there in a couple of weeks, I was thinking about buying a new generator in Cebu on our way through. Our current generator is small Chinese made gasoline unit, only 3-5 kw, and was bought just for the occasional brownout or emergency. Its a off brand generator but appears to be working well, just a little underpowered for when we get there.

 

My questions are:

 

1. Diesel or gasoline.

2. What size do we need to run lights, refrigerator and maybe a small window type aircon unit in the bedroom. The home is about 110 sq meters. I am thinking at least 8kw.

3. Cost.

4. Whats a good place in Cebu to check out generators.

5. Best brand that's affordable.

 

 

Thanks in advance.............

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I might as well add my 2 cents worth, since I have been running everything off my generator since Nov. 8 when the power went off.   I have a 5kw, Kubota, diesel generator rated at 100% duty cycle.

Guys, PLEASE, if you know little to nothing about electricity, again, PLEASE, let a proper electrician connect a generator you may buy, to your home circuits. Back feeding into the electric grid can b

If you can find one at the moment .......................   In Bohol you wouldn't be able to buy one anywhere .... they're all sold out. A friend of mine here sourced one in Cebu, 8.5kw for 68k peso

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For long term continuous running, diesel.

 

I would have thought that 5kW would be enough,  but others who actually use them, might have different ideas.

 

Cant answer the rest of your questions.

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jtmwatchbiz

 

 

4. Whats a good place in Cebu to check out generators.

 

i don't know about your other questions but i'm sure others here will soon enough. for power equipment like generators i would suggest belmont hardware in downtown cebu city as they have a huge selection for when you have your particular model and brand decided upon.   

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miles-high

Definitely diesel… the lower volatility of diesel fuel makes it much safer to store large quantity of fuel…

 

Having experienced the Northwest Blackout of 2003, two smaller generators would be better than one...

 

But I would think one is OK as long as you run it periodically to test it...

 

The popular size in Guam is 10kw to 50kw (after the typhoon Pongsona of 2002, many homes are equipped with even larger gensets)...

 

More importantly, you should consider the capacity of your above- or under-ground fuel storage (300, 600 or more gallons, depending on your needs and budget).

 

One of the reasons all my condos have standby generators (shared by others so that the total cost would be lower...  ;)).

 

 

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A typical 30kw to 50kw genset... about US$7,000 to 15,000 in the mainland US (sorry never bought one here in the Philippines). :)

 

Edited by miles-high
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Mandingo

Definitely diesel… the lower volatility of diesel fuel makes it much safer to store large quantity of fuel…

 

Having experienced the Northwest Blackout of 2003, two smaller generators would be better than one...

 

But I would think one is OK as long as you run it periodically to test it...

 

The popular size in Guam is 10kw to 50kw (after the typhoon Pongsona of 2002, many homes are equipped with even larger gensets)...

 

More importantly, you should consider the capacity of your above- or under-ground fuel storage (300, 600 or more gallons, depending on your needs and budget).

 

One of the reasons all my condos have standby generators (shared by others so that the total cost would be lower...  ;)).

 

 

attachicon.gifmenuImgComm1.jpg

A typical 30kw to 50kw genset... about US$7,000 to 15,000 in the mainland US (sorry never bought one here in the Philippines). :)

Thanks for the info. $7,000 to $15,000 is a little out of my price range but looks like it could handle anything you could throw at it, lol.

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I agree with the 2 genset idea, since you already have 1.

 

If your fridge and aircon compressors started at the

same time, 5kw would not be enough.... I would be worried

about damaging something if a compressor stalled.

 

They can easily pull 3X there rated current at startup.

 

Personally, I would keep the 3-5kw for the fridge, and but an 8kw diesel for aircon and lights.

 

The 2 different fuel type could be a neuscence thou....

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It looks like the generator at my place is underpowered for what the needs of the family are. With them being in Ormoc and having no electric for at least a couple weeks, and us being there in a couple of weeks, I was thinking about buying a new generator in Cebu on our way through. Our current generator is small Chinese made gasoline unit, only 3-5 kw, and was bought just for the occasional brownout or emergency. Its a off brand generator but appears to be working well, just a little underpowered for when we get there.

 

My questions are:

 

1. Diesel or gasoline.

2. What size do we need to run lights, refrigerator and maybe a small window type aircon unit in the bedroom. The home is about 110 sq meters. I am thinking at least 8kw.

3. Cost.

4. Whats a good place in Cebu to check out generators.

5. Best brand that's affordable.

 

You already know not to go Chinese. They are loud, vibrate like hell, and will not last long if used constantly. 

 

So, my opinion is, for the long haul:

 

1. Diesel.

2. 8 Kilowatts will probably run your entire home, unless you have any appliances that take voltage converters - from 220 to 110? I have purchased, and sold generators on more than one occasion, in the Philippines. When I lived in Bogo, I had a 1,000 watts converter for a 600 watts bread maker from the US. Just plugging in one of these - step down transformers, causes it to draw power. So, if you have those, try not to use them. 

3, 4, and 5. Look at Belmont, as already has been suggested. Of course, other hardware stores will probably sell them as well. 

 

Western home, or Filipino home? I mean, lots of appliances, etc., as well?

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broden

i don't know anything about them but there are also solar generators

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Mandingo

You already know not to go Chinese. They are loud, vibrate like hell, and will not last long if used constantly. 

 

So, my opinion is, for the long haul:

 

1. Diesel.

2. 8 Kilowatts will probably run your entire home, unless you have any appliances that take voltage converters - from 220 to 110? I have purchased, and sold generators on more than one occasion, in the Philippines. When I lived in Bogo, I had a 1,000 watts converter for a 600 watts bread maker from the US. Just plugging in one of these - step down transformers, causes it to draw power. So, if you have those, try not to use them. 

3, 4, and 5. Look at Belmont, as already has been suggested. Of course, other hardware stores will probably sell them as well. 

 

Western home, or Filipino home? I mean, lots of appliances, etc., as well?

Small home built for my wife's two boys. Basically a typical foreigner built small hollow-block home, tile floor, insulated windows with a few appliances like fridge, lighting, TV, rice cooker and small aircon unit in the bedroom. Using a hand pump now for the well and cooking outside with wood.

 

The Chinese compressor is loud, shakes like hell and, although is rated at 5kw max, is really only about a 3kw, maybe. Problem is since many of the neighbors lost their homes and ours is one of the few homes left standing and has a generator it's getting a hard workout, more than it's intended purpose.I am thinking when we come to get at least a quality brand 8kw but keep the one we have now too like was already said, Thanks......

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I agree. While I feel the 8K will run your home, both will probably be necessary. Just make sure they don't wire both to feed the same circuits at the same time. That will not be pretty.

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smokey

We use a 8800 promate loud as heck sure but cheap to buy .... of course my dream generator will be a 15 KW wired to the house and with a hospital muffler but i sure am not willing to spend the required 700,000 p for that dream ...... we have now used our generator 3 times in one year and even with that little time on it required maint. because we did not use it and the v power gas did something to the gaskets...and even with this 8800 the ac do not work unless you cut everything else off but the ac.... the 8800 cost about 70,000 MAX and if you look about i have seen them for 55,000... I just had my repaired by Striker one of our members who was a mech. in mother russia.. works great now..

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If you can find one at the moment .......................

 

In Bohol you wouldn't be able to buy one anywhere .... they're all sold out. A friend of mine here sourced one in Cebu, 8.5kw for 68k pesos, but it took him all day and numerous calls to find it. The funny part was when he finally got it home, the power came on!

 

If you can wait another 6 months there will be a glut of second hand generators for sale.

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SkyMan
It looks like the generator at my place is underpowered for what the needs of the family are. With them being in Ormoc and having no electric for at least a couple weeks, and us being there in a couple of weeks, I was thinking about buying a new generator in Cebu on our way through. Our current generator is small Chinese made gasoline unit, only 3-5 kw, and was bought just for the occasional brownout or emergency. Its a off brand generator but appears to be working well, just a little underpowered for when we get there.

3-5Kw should be fine if you forget the AC.  What makes you say it is underpowered?  I bought a 1.1Kw gas generator and it ran our smallish ref/desktop computer with LED monitor and lights no problem.  I did not turn on the microwave, coffee maker, or use any power tools.  What is the monthly KWH usage?  Ours is about 220KWH or 7.33KWH/day and that includes power tools, welder, etc.  If you figure most of your usage is during 12 hours of the day that's still under 650W average usage. 

Edited by SkyMan
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SkyMan

 

 

The funny part was when he finally got it home, the power came on!
That may be the case for the OP if he's not going to be there for a couple weeks.
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Generators could be likened to insurance policies. dont have one because you will never need it. Have a small one and use it very occasionally. Go for full coverage and youre prepared for anything.

Diesel is definitley king. To figure out your needed capacity, add up all the loadings the appliances you are likely to run at once will draw, double it and you should be safe. Having been at Belmont yesterday afternoon, gennys are going out the door at a high rate of knots!!

Another consideration is to choose between transportable or fixed mount. Transportable would enable you to help out family members who live away from you etc. Fixed mount will draw them to your house like flies.

Reputable brands like Genset etc will provide hassle free high intensity use, but unbranded will meet the needs of the occasional light user.

I personally had a 3.5kw petrol genny wired into the house on the south side of the main circuit breaker. With the breaker in the off position we ran all the lights needed in the house, a large side by side fridge/freezer, and any sockets for charging phones etc. One gallon of juice was lasting about an hour and a half. With the power now back on, i have left the connection tails in place on the main circuit breaker. This way, changing from Veco to genny is now a 5 min job!!!!!

It really is a pay your money, take your chance!

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