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ILoveCyrus

How to increase home water pressure...?

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ILoveCyrus

I'm a dummy....so can someone plz post photos and diagram of on ground pressure water tank. We live within all these HOA rules and regs. I wanna do something about this water pressure issue.

 

So fill tank on ground level with pump and pressure tank to pump up to 2nd floor? I need diagram and schematics to get a visual PLZ.

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Woolf

Just one of many  (10 sec on google)

 

http://powertekengg.com/booster.php

 

 

  ok the storage tank is missing to the right of the pump

Edited by Woolf

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SkyMan

 

 

ok the storage tank is missing to the right of the pump
And the input to the tank comes from the main.  The tank has a float valve in it to close the main when the tank is full.  The left side goes to where the main goes in your house now.  (Which I assume is not on your second floor.)

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ILoveCyrus

And the input to the tank comes from the main.  The tank has a float valve in it to close the main when the tank is full.  The left side goes to where the main goes in your house now.  (Which I assume is not on your second floor.)

 

 

Ughh.... I'll just get a Pro to give me an estimate. 

 

You didn't think I was gonna do this myself.........???

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Paul

Um, yeah, we did. :P

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Raven

Just finished our...Storage Tank/Booster Pump/Pressure Tank System...and it works fine. At this time we only have our private cr/shower and kitchen using, from system and guestroom cr are not in use yet. Boarding house is bypassed, the pressure system, as it will be used for garden watering later. Our shallow well, is connected to the system for future use (garden watering) and emergency use in household (like Sendong...no water in 3 weeks!)

Booster Pump goes on at 20 psi and off at 40 psi. I put a pressure gauge on water District to follow their pressure...5-10 psi at daytime (and less if just one faucet is open) and around 20 psi night time.

If brownout and the pressure fall, Water District bypass the system. (or I start the generator)

Could not find a plumber understanding, what I was talking about, so I ask my carpenter to make it!

 

post-14558-0-16617400-1394240806_thumb.jpg

 

One valve and one switch, installed in Storage Tank...Floating Valve to stop when full and Floating Switch to stop pump if empty.

Edited by Raven
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lopburi3

Here in Bangkok almost every home has a storage water tank at ground level that processed water feeds into using a float valve - simple.  Then output of tank is run to pump/home for good water pressure - simple.  Emergency no electric direct usage by two on/off taps on lines or one way stop valve (almost never needed so manual control a real option).  The only real variable is the pump with some using well type pumps as above with pressure tank and others using high pressure always on when using type to maintain about 60psi pressure. 

 

In countryside high water tanks may be an option (for low pressure unless very high) but are a real issue in confined areas and very heavy when full of water.  Better to use pumps to feed your water system rather than to fill an elevated tank in such cases and mush more compact system.  I would recommend larger storage tanks to account for any public water outages (I use two 1250 liter units tied together but most will only use a single of about 1k).  If you ever have to order water delivery good to have storage container.

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Raven

We got water for about 3 days in the 1000 L tank, but as soon as guestrooms are in use, it might be too small, so I plan to add and outdoor tank. Same with pressure tank, not really sure if 26 gallons is enough, but it's easy to install additional tank. I even prepared pipes, for solar heating of hot water, so in future we can save electricity on the instant heaters.

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lopburi3

Be careful pumping solar water however.  I had to build sun roof over my SS water tanks to keep temp low enough to prevent overheat cut-off of my Grundfos MQ3-45 pump.

   

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Raven

I'm not into the setup yet 'cos it for future use. But the plan was only pumping the "cold water" into Solar Heater.

 

ThermosyphonGraphic2.gif

Edited by Raven

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Thalcoozyo

 To be honest, I wish I had gone the roof tank gravity feed method rather than using a pressure tank. Our pressure tank gives us so many problems - primarily rusting at the bottom weld and developing pinhole leaks. The locally produced tanks are just rubbish. We are on #3 already. I should probably bite the bullet and get a "proper" one!

 

This is true.  I, too, have low water pressure and did the resevoir, pump it to pressure tank, then pressure tank to house method.  The pressure tank is just a pain as the longevity is, for me, about 3 yrs. before it sprouts pinhole leaks. And the pump kicking on frequently puts a GIANT strain on the electric circuitry... resulting in dimming of lights and refer problems when the pump kicks on.   Wish I had just used a resevoir, pump to elevated tank, then elevated tank to house (gravity feed). The pump would not need to kick on so often, this way. However, you better make dang sure that that elevated tank is VERY secure if you are in an earthquake prone area, or even in an area with frequent tremblers.  It is easier to lose an elevated tank than what you may think.

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Paul

Personally, I don't know why more people do not go with Poly tanks. If you just keep them out of the sun (roof, awning, or other covering), they will perform much better than the steel tanks, in my opinion.

 

5000_liter_water_tanks.jpg

 

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Paul

So, ILoveCyrus, what did you end up going with? It is March, after all. You have had plenty of time to think about this, and have lots of information from the (very well) informed members of this site. :D

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Raven

 

 

The water supply at our place is also inadequate which is why we have a well. To be honest, I wish I had gone the roof tank gravity feed method rather than using a pressure tank. Our pressure tank gives us so many problems - primarily rusting at the bottom weld and developing pinhole leaks. The locally produced tanks are just rubbish. We are on #3 already. I should probably bite the bullet and get a "proper" one!

 

Which brand do you consider as proper one?

Is there any issues with the rubber membrane?

 

 

 

This is true. I, too, have low water pressure and did the resevoir, pump it to pressure tank, then pressure tank to house method. The pressure tank is just a pain as the longevity is, for me, about 3 yrs. before it sprouts pinhole leaks. And the pump kicking on frequently puts a GIANT strain on the electric circuitry... resulting in dimming of lights and refer problems when the pump kicks on. Wish I had just used a resevoir, pump to elevated tank, then elevated tank to house (gravity feed). The pump would not need to kick on so often, this way. However, you better make dang sure that that elevated tank is VERY secure if you are in an earthquake prone area, or even in an area with frequent tremblers. It is easier to lose an elevated tank than what you may think.

 

So you are talking rust too?

 

The pump might use 3 times the marked wattage when kicking in, but I installed a submeter for the pump only and after first month it used about P2,- per day (Cepalco P8,-/kwh)

It's a shallow well pump 1HP/750w and not noted any issues with dimming of light and if there is, I'll just connect the pump to another breaker box (have 3 supply lines)

The pressure tank is from Global Water Solutions Ltd

 

"a resevoir, pump to elevated tank, then elevated tank to house (gravity feed)." might be a good idea...even a small, maybe less than 500L elevated tank would be okay. A 26 gallon pressure tank don't hold 26 gallons of water, but maybe half or less depending on the pressure...meaning the pump have to switch on more often. Not a power consumption issue, but lifespan on pump.

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lopburi3

 

 

Personally, I don't know why more people do not go with Poly tanks. If you just keep them out of the sun (roof, awning, or other covering), they will perform much better than the steel tanks, in my opinion.

The cheap blue tanks will allow light to enter and result can be real algae problems.  So unless you enjoy slime to be avoided.  Not sure how they stand up to sun UV.  The more expensive sandstone type have seen positive reports about but about the same price as good SS and SS works fine for most people (mine are 20 years old and no issues) but understand that can vary by the type of water stored.  The old galvanized iron square tanks do not last very long at all.

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