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ILoveCyrus

How to increase home water pressure...?

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ILoveCyrus

Live in a newer sub-division, yet it is STILL missing some things.....let me explain.  The water and electricity service leaves ALOT to be desired here.  You all know this already.

 

1. we're on Mactan, on a very slight slope.  People lower have water more often, we are on a slight slope so we get sh1t pressure.  Most days are ok to good....

2. I can put my thumb to plug most taps around the house, and flow will stop.  It's ridiculous.

3. Is there a pump or something that I can install at the main --- to INCREASE my water pressure??

4. upstairs bathroom --- fuggetaboutit....!!!  I have to wake up at early am to fill our upstairs buckets, before everyone wakes up in the neighborhood.

 

We've talked to the HOA.  We've complained to MCWD, etc. etc.

 

My neighbor, 4 years ago, fought .....and got his own water drilled some 18 meters deep.  He said it is fresh water from the Aquifers below.  Cost him p60k, he said.  He welcomes me to get water from him anytime....nice Frenchman.

 

Water tank above?  or drill a well below?

 

DANG IT.........we just want good, steady water pressure....!!!

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cebubird

IN our case we installed the water tank about 6 meters high and that has basically solved that problem.

We thought about installing a pressure pump just inside our front fence where the water comes in, BUT if no electric, still no water

Have also thought about a well, but for now-----.

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Woolf

If there is not enough pressure to fill a bucket at the floor of the second floor, how will you be able to fill a tank at 6 meter high ?

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cebubird

Woolf, stick to earthquake/storm info. You do a WONDERFUL service there.

His tank will obviously fill up during the night when there is better pressure because of no usage, as ours does(read # 4 of his post)

Thanks again for all your wonderful updates with our weather situation.

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SkyMan

Run a pipe from your neighbor and pay him p300/month or so. Why drill another well and buy another pump? Your only concern is if he sells his house.

 

I believe pumping from the mains is illegal.

 

You could put a storage tank in that would fill overnight. Then a pressure tank/pump.

Edited by SkyMan
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ILoveCyrus

Great info guys.  What's that gonna cost me?  A tank on 2nd floor and a pressure tank too....?  Average costs with installation?

 

My neighbor who has a deep well is about 5-6 houses down and across the street.....not practical to pipe it up to me.

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Paddy

I would be inclined to use the mains to fill a tank on the lowest point of my property and then pump it to a tank on the roof. The roof tank would gravity feed the house. You don't need a pressure tank if your pump is not "connected" to the house pipes.

 

In the event of brownout, you can get water from the lower tank if the roof tank is empty.

 

If you have a two storey house, you probably won't need to pump more than 25 feet. That's in shallow jet pump territory.

 

You could probably rig two float switches to control the pump operation so you could avoid manual or timed switching for the pump.

 

Many of the "better" houses in our local town also use the roof tank method. I don't know if they have adequate pressure to fill them directly or have to use some pumping system. I am inclined to think that some of them might need pumps.

 

The water supply at our place is also inadequate which is why we have a well. To be honest, I wish I had gone the roof tank gravity feed method rather than using a pressure tank. Our pressure tank gives us so many problems - primarily rusting at the bottom weld and developing pinhole leaks. The locally produced tanks are just rubbish. We are on #3 already. I should probably bite the bullet and get a "proper" one!

 

Our main well (60') was about 60k including the pump. We also have a 2nd well with a manual pump. This is also around 60' but cost closer to 40k - it's about 20k for the well and 18k ish for the hardware / install labour. Given that we're out in the country and the well drillers are local guys and I don't do the negotiating, you might have to pay more than that.

 

Other costs - hmmm - I'm guessing. Pump around 15k. A tank can be had for less than 10k but I don't recommend going cheap. If you know for sure you're getting stainless steel and "proper" welding and a big tank, it could be more than 10k.

.

Edited by Paddy
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SkyMan

Great info guys. What's that gonna cost me? A tank on 2nd floor and a pressure tank too....? Average costs with installation?

If you used a pressure tank/pump, you don't need to elevate the holding tank. If you elevate the tank and have a shower on the second floor the tank would need to be on the third floor to run that shower and would just run but not spray. The holding tank can be on the ground with a pressure tank/pump.

 

Pumps are a bit load though so I would plan on putting it away from the house behind some wall or something.

Edited by SkyMan
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dHb

Our house is built on the slope of a small hill in Tayud, Liloan and we had the same issues with water pressure. Got a stainless steel tank (S-tank if I remember) installed on the roof with float valve. This fills up in the night usually and lasts the whole of the following day with good pressure.

 

Some "issues" though:

  1. Make sure the plumber is good and experienced  :banghead:   we got a guy who basically messed up the connections and as a result we have had to install a cut-off valve below as the float valve doesn't work properly and the tank overflows.
  2. Shading the tank - during the day, the water can be freaking boiling if you want to have a bath. I usually fill up a couple of buckets in the morning and let it cool before attempting a bath (lesson learnt after nearing getting scalded alive!)
  3. Securing the tank properly - our house has a unique design with a kind of atrium in the middle. This space has a platform built up on top out of 6-inch rebar and the tank is bolted+welded onto it - very strong and has withstood some serious winds already (got to get it checked this week after the typhoon). Most houses have tanks mounted on the outside on metal framework.

I've been considering getting a borewell put in but we don't really spend much time in the Philippines so we've decided to put it off (and the problems with the float valve, etc) until we're ready to "retire".

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David_LivinginTalisay

I built an elevated Stainless Steel Storage Tank that was > 1 meter higher than the shower head.  That gave enough pressure for the ground floor (which is all we had to start with).

When I built a 3 Storey Extension the mains pressure was enough for shower on the 3rd Floor.  Trouble was the 'mains water' was not constant (powered by pumps from the Subdivision Water Company).

So I fitted a Pressure Tank.   This has a rubber-bladder that is pressurized and that forces the water to the upper floors with plenty of pressure.  A pump turns on automatically, to refill the pressure tank with more water (from the storage tank) when the pressurized water is low.

 

The electric motor developed a fault after more than a years use.  We did not bother replacing it as the Water Supply is no available during the whole day (we don't take showers after midnight, nor flush the toilets more than once usually, til 6am say), so not a problem.

 

Having a new tower on the 3rd Floor, might have been a better solution!  If we ever expand the original Bungalow to 3 floors, this will be done.

 

NB: One needs one-way valves to stop the water in the tank going down when the mains pressure goes off, and the  pressure pump, sending water the wrong way.
 

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dHb

...

NB: One needs one-way valves to stop the water in the tank going down when the mains pressure goes off, and the  pressure pump, sending water the wrong way.

 

 

:rofl: This happened to me. I filled up the tank and the next morning went to have a shower and no water! I called the plumber and THEN he tells me that there should be another valve fitted in to prevent this.... So I paid for my water and then gave it back....

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Davaoeno

:rofl: This happened to me. I filled up the tank and the next morning went to have a shower and no water! I called the plumber and THEN he tells me that there should be another valve fitted in to prevent this.... So I paid for my water and then gave it back....

 

I cant believe that you had a plumber do some work and then when he was finished didnt ask him if he should have done anything else !!  :ROFLMAO:

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SkyMan

I cant believe that you had a plumber do some work and then when he was finished didnt ask him if he should have done anything else !!  :ROFLMAO:

Repeat business.

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dHb

I cant believe that you had a plumber do some work and then when he was finished didnt ask him if he should have done anything else !!  :ROFLMAO:

 

Yeah, dumb of me but then he was recommended by a family friend. And we had no issues when he completed the work as water was still flowing in - it was only after the water stopped sometime in the early morning that I realized I had a problem. Oh well, lessons have to be learnt, don't they? Particularly when it concerns construction and related activities....

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thebob

Water is still mysterious technology here.

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