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Super Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan)

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Ronin

thats so much cash ....it should go a very long way in the phillipines .....i hope it all finds its way to the people that acctually need it!

I also hope it is used effectively. Like a real life sim city.

 

Disclaimer: Never played the game but think it applies to building cities from scratch.

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easy44

That's they key question, isn't it? How much money will filter down to the people who really need it? I have families in my neighborhood who just need a kilo of nails and a few sheets of roofing material to substantially rebuild their homes. The other materials are laying around on the ground to pick up.

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easy44

The goodies have arrived! My gf just returned from Villaba with our multicab overloaded with food bags. We have just about the whole barangay at our place picking up the packages and there are lots of smiling faces! A bit of happy news that we needed badly.

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David_LivinginTalisay

easy44, on 23 Nov 2013 - 07:01 AM, said:

 

That's they key question, isn't it? How much money will filter down to the people who really need it? I have families in my neighborhood who just need a kilo of nails and a few sheets of roofing material to substantially rebuild their homes. The other materials are laying around on the ground to pick up.

 

In the case of UK Aid, that total contribution is not just money* but services, through the Department for International Development (DFID)  and supplying skilled manpower - soldiers, engineers, doctors, coordinators , equipment, vehicles - 9 x Land Rovers 2 x JCB's & JCB Fork Lift, ships - HMS Daring and HMS Illustrious, 6 x helicopters, planes - Hercules C130 and C17 ,  8 x UK Aid Air Freight flights, - food for 200,000 people - 100,000kg rice, high energy biscuits  , temporary shelters - 1,076 Tents, 17,712 shelter kits (4 familes each). 38,569 tarpaulins, bedding, 1,364 blankets, cooking provisions 78,000 people, safe drinking water for 200,000 people, 5,925 jerry cans, materials to repair the homes of 25,000 people, 11,230 hygiene kits,  pit latrines, for 100,000 people and solar lanterns to people through the Rapid Response Facility.

 

*£30 million to support the UN and Red Cross emergency appeals good for 500,000 people of the Philippines.

 

Even with all this, it is not enough however, but a bloody fine effort from the people of the UK and I am proud, of what they have/are achieving for those suffering in the Philippines.

 

If all major countries donated as much, as quickly and efficiently as the UK, those still suffering from the effects of Super Typhoon Yolanda, would be a lot less.

post-198-0-52070800-1385194928_thumb.jpg

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Lee

 

MANILA, Philippines - The government on Saturday announced that the number of those who perished because of Supertyphoon "Yolanda" has risen to 5,235 and may still climb.

The number of missing is 1,613 while 23,501 were injured.  More....

:(

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PeteHK

Yes, the UK has set a great example to the international community in terms of both the official aid donated and the amount of money raised from the general public through organizations like the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC).  Judging from the e-mails we received from family and friends who know we have a home in Cebu the level of awareness of the impact of Haiyan has been amazing.  People have been very moved by what they've seen thanks to the great media coverage from BBC, Sky and others.

 

I really, really hope though that careful consideration will be given to the reconstruction process (where, how, what) so that the same conditions are not just recreated again.

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easy44

Yes, the UK has set a great example to the international community in terms of both the official aid donated and the amount of money raised from the general public through organizations like the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC). Judging from the e-mails we received from family and friends who know we have a home in Cebu the level of awareness of the impact of Haiyan has been amazing. People have been very moved by what they've seen thanks to the great media coverage from BBC, Sky and others.

 

I really, really hope though that careful consideration will be given to the reconstruction process (where, how, what) so that the same conditions are not just recreated again.

Not sure what can be done to improve the conditions. Obviously you can't build everyone a new concrete home, so the poor will rebuild their nipa huts. Leyte does not historically suffer from many typhoons, like Luzon does, so rebuilding for a once in a lifetime super typhoon event like Yolanda is not practical. This storm could just as easily hit any of the other islands in the Philippines, it just happened to hit where it did. Edited by easy44

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David_LivinginTalisay

It ain't over... until the fat lady sings!

 

The 'fat lady' in this case is UK AID and she is ready to start singing that the AiD efforts provided by Britain is over.  In fact there is a longer term commitment now!

 

Britain will give the Philippines the long term support it needs to get back on its feet after the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan.

 

Britain will give the Philippines the long term support it needs to get back on its feet after the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan, International Development Secretary Justine Greening has announced during a visit to some of the hardest-hit parts of the country.

Click for more information

 

The commitment was made during this weekend’s visit to Cebu and Tacloban where she is seeing how UK personnel and equipment have been getting UK aid supplies to people in the most remote parts of the country and helping to coordinate wider international humanitarian efforts.

The latest support from the UK Government includes:

  • 6 new UK aid flights over the next 6 days (Sunday, Nov 24 to Friday, Nov 29) carrying vital DFID supplies to the Philippines including tents, blankets and cooking sets
  • a £5 million investment in resilience for up to four cities in the Philippines, so they can plan for and invest in measures such as flood protection and drainage systems that will help in the event of future extreme weather events
  • a £3 million allocation from within the £30m pledged to the UN and Red Cross appeals to ensure women and girls are not disproportionally affected by the crisis. This will give women access to relief items and documentation, provide psychosocial support and safe spaces for women, help those who have suffered violence get vital care, and provide services to help reunite families
  • a £2 million allocation from within the £30m pledged to the UN and Red Cross appeals to allow UNICEF to increase nutrition provision alongside the increased capacity of the primary health care system. DFID will support nutritional services and will enable the establishment of community based therapeutic feeding centres for girls and boys with severe acute malnutrition
  • £1 million allocation from within the £30m pledged to the UN and Red Cross appeals to help 3,000 people to receive the tools and materials they need to rebuild their houses.

Justine Greening said:

I have visited some of the worst-hit areas and heard from survivors who have lost everything. I have seen how DFID and our military are delivering UK aid supplies to the most desperate parts of the Philippines and how our help is getting these people back on their feet.

While we can be proud that UK kit and personnel are making a difference in the immediate term, we will not stop here.

In the coming months the UK will be working hard to help build a better future for all the people of the Philippines, including girls and women who are often the ones who suffer disproportionally in the wake of crises like this.

During her visit, Justine Greening saw how the UK is playing a leading role in getting aid to people who need it. A RAF C130 is delivering vital supplies to hard-hit regions three times a day and the UK has doubled the capacity of Cebu airbase, now the country’s aid hub, with the delivery of vital loading equipment.

In Tacloban, the roads have been cleared, hospitals and schools are reopening and, amongst the devastation, food and water is being delivered to the people who need it. Over 3 million people have now received food assistance in Tacloban, Guiuan and Ormoc, nearly 4 times as many people as the beginning of the week.

While in the Philippines, Ms Greening also met the crew and captain of HMS Daring, one of the two Royal Navy warships the British Prime Minister has sent to the islands.

She heard how they have been distributing shelter packs and fresh water to islands like Canas, Calagnaan and Tulunanaun where people had been sleeping under piles of rubbish to escape the elements. HMS Daring has also taken a team of British doctors deployed by DFID to treat the injured in some of the most cut-off communities.

The additional 6 aid flights announced by Ms Greening are expected to carry the following kit:

  • 1,130 Tents to be distributed by ACTED and Handicap International
  • 22,000 plastic sheets to be distributed by NGO partners
  • 3,000 cooking sets, 19,800 buckets, 13,000 synthetic blankets, 4,000 wool blankets, 295 tents, and 23,000 Tarpaulins to be distributed by NGO partners.

Cities in the Philippines at risk from future floods, storms and extreme weather events are to receive help to mitigate the risks of climate change. DFID, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Asian Development Bank will make £5m in support available for up to four cities in the Philippines to plan for and invest in resilience amid increasing urbanisation in the country. The funding will help:

  • support physical improvements in cities such as drainage, housing, flood protection, and wastewater systems
  • enhance surveillance and early warning systems
  • update building codes, regulations
  • reform resilience-focused water and land-use planning.

The £3 million towards protecting the most vulnerable people, including women and girls, will include support to UNHCR, UNFPA and UNICEF interventions such as the provision of protection kits, psychosocial support, women friendly spaces and family tracing and re-unification.

 

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Brucewayne

Not sure what can be done to improve the conditions. Obviously you can't build everyone a new concrete home, so the poor will rebuild their nipa huts. Leyte does not historically suffer from many typhoons, like Luzon does, so rebuilding for a once in a lifetime super typhoon event like Yolanda is not practical. This storm could just as easily hit any of the other islands in the Philippines, it just happened to hit where it did.

 

There probably won't be as many people going back there if my wife's friends are any kind of indicator.

We had 3 ladies from that area here when they first arrived in Cebu and they stayed until they could find accomodations.

They say they would never go back for any reasonand would take their chances here even though they will probably have a hard time finding jobs.

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easy44

There probably won't be as many people going back there if my wife's friends are any kind of indicator.

We had 3 ladies from that area here when they first arrived in Cebu and they stayed until they could find accomodations.

They say they would never go back for any reasonand would take their chances here even though they will probably have a hard time finding jobs.

Not logical, but then what's logic got to do with it?

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Brucewayne

Not logical, but then what's logic got to do with it?

 

Sounds logical to me, no food, very little water and no work there and things are probably going to be really bad for at least a year.

I wouldn't want to be there either.

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easy44

Never go back for any reason doesn't sound logical to me. Things will be back to semi normal well before one year. As soon as power is restored rehab will happen fast, and much faster in the countryside, like where I am right now. These people had so little before the typhoon that there wasn't much to take away. Most of the nipa huts in my neighborhood are now livable if not entirely reconstructed. The rice harvest wasn't affected as it happened before the storm hit and the new crop hasn't been planted yet. Copra will take a big hit because of all the coconut trees down, though. My guess would be that in 6 months life in the boonies will be pretty much back to normal. The cities are a different story, although Ormoc seems to be recovering fast. Tacloban had much more damage so things will be slower there. I am truly impressed with the resiliency of the Filipinos.

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Jester

I do not know about PI's but in FL after a hurricane is a financial boom time! Whiner

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musicman666

it would be a step in the right direction if the tacloban goverment took measures to reinstate the mangroves that were prevalent before fish pens took over. A lot of the real damage was caused by the surge which would have been mitigated by natural mangroves. Rather than use all the money to simply rebuild houses it would be wise to think about the next possible storm and how to deal with it.

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