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How to get rid of squatters in your land?


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Agree.  Squattting is a way of life here.  Rather than fighting it as some do, I applaud the civilized way of dealing with it.  Do you have any idea of the verbal agreement the previous owner of the land may have had with the squatters?  It may be helpful to find out.

I would approach that question with some caution. Memories can be poor. A lot lf the land disputes I am aware of have exactly this issue as the basis for the argument. Some relative or landowner will recall a "deal" made but one of the parties remembers it differently or is dead. We have this going on in my family now.

 

If you approach the situation with the common sense you seem to be using, make your offer without regard to promises that were made by others.

 

In the area I live, landowners will often use the bullying technique to get their way. They will blockade a road or some right of way and leave it to the impoverished to deal with it. These can sometimes be landowners, not squatters. It works in the favor of the bully since the poor will not want to get legal representation. Use of the PAO is not automatically given to landowners.

 

We have a classic case of squatting that has involved abandoned government land. For decades, families have built squatter homes on this land. These are hollow block structures with electricity, even dream satellite on some. If you were to make a google earth search you could see these squatters just between two strips of privately owned land.

 

An enterprising barangay chairman used the existing laws to claim the land from the government. He had been collecting "rent" from most of the homeowners. Now, he owned the land outright and would sell it to any family that wanted to own their lot. The price was ridiculously high for a piece of shit land and house, which they had lived in for decades.

 

It worked.

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Take the maybe 150,000-200,000 you have mentally budgeted and arrange to buy them a cheap piece of land as a replacement. Of course it wont be on the water- because that is the reason that the land wh

if you can come up with another piece of land, great. if you offer them money, make it all or nothing. Either they all take it and leave or nobody gets it. Pit them against each other. Otherwise you w

The problem that I see is that by your own admission these are productive people who rely on their location for their livelihood.   I can understand that you want to "develop" land that is yours, bu

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You're right, Shadow. I'm just not so sure I would be comfortable relocating them to a shanty even though they live in one now (and I am glad it's not my problem).

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BossHog

MikeeW has encapsulated the issue and the preferred solution better than I have.

 

I could easily see where the fishermen's families would be hesitant to receive land as a settlement when the land they currently reside on is being taken away from them. I'm sure that if offered the choice between cooperative land and a small stack of cash they would naturally choose the latter. I think it would be better to grant them what they wish rather than what might be ultimately more beneficial: i.e. cash up front instead of new land.

 

Also, involving lawyers is intimidating to unlettered people and settling everything within the baranguay context is preferable. I think consulting my lawyer is a good idea but any paperwork should be done locally with people we all know. There will be no lawsuit of eviction originating from me.

 

Most of the people involved are, unsurprisingly, related and paying them off together would mean they won't have to share out all their settlement which is customary.

 

If we wait until their neighbours and relatives are evicted without compensation by the new owner next door and then I offer cash in hand, they would most likely accept whatever I offer. Wishful thinking maybe.

Edited by BossHog
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shadow

You're right, Shadow. I'm just not so sure I would be comfortable relocating them to a shanty even though they live in one now (and I am glad it's not my problem).

This "Shanty" is nicer than probably 80% of the populace lives in.

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Have them all move in with you !

Edited by Baywak
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This "Shanty" is nicer than probably 80% of the populace lives in.

 

 

You have lived there much longer than I have. I still think in western terms obviously.  :) I must fix that.

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BossHog

post-5791-0-88985500-1382749595_thumb.jpg

 

The view from my picnic table where I sit and type on LinC. The area in question is in the lower right part of the photo. The duck house across the river is sadly of nicer construction than the people's.

 

post-5791-0-93989400-1382749764_thumb.jpg

 

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View from my bedroom window. No worries on this side of this property as the nearest neighbor in that direction lives over those hills. He's from Cornwall.

post-5791-0-56160600-1382770498_thumb.jpg

Edited by BossHog
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Beautiful BossHog,I wouldn't change a thing.Reminds me of Vietnam.

Good friends around,guarding the perimeter.really man,its beautiful,squatters and all.

Edited by Baywak
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Is a cheap charlie Brit living in one of those huts? What's with the British flag?

 

 

The more you talk about your land and where you live, the more envious I become.  That river looks beautiful.  Apart from the crabs, what's the fishing like? Anything good?

 

Want to sell me a thousand square meters of the river bank for 10 pesos each?

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Maybe you just donate a part of your land to them...in an area where its not too disturbing for your plans. You might have some serious trouble getting them out, even you call some of them friends. Even the trees they planted on your land, you have to pay for.

And a warning to others...NEVER buy land with squatters.

I hope they are not squatters like we know, here from the city. They are....well..yes!

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Seeing the photos reinforces my comments about using a negotiation to dispose of this issue. This is pretty similar to what I've seen in our area.

 

There is a slight benefit to having people you know nearby. Helps in case of catastrophe. But, that goes both ways.

 

In my area, during my wife's lifetime, the national road went from a dirt road with wooden bridges to a cemented highway with standard cement bridges. Now, every bridge has two or more families living under them. The unused old national road, abandoned by the government, is filled with homes. Farmers tolerate squatters on their land as a sort of security to watch the copra when it is harvested. The NPA is reluctant to pass through some of these areas because of more people....though that is a double edged sword. The NPA recruits from these same squatters.

 

In our area, many of the new residents are extended family members who have found the going pretty hard in the city and came back to the province for the laid back existence.

 

The trouble with this is that these families have children and these children grow up with aspirations and dreams which are unfulfilled. So, they turn to petty crime to make their lives more comfortable. Seems quaint and rustic. Until these same neighbors are "borrowing" stuff from their neighbor who has too much stuff anyway.

 

Be strong.

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BossHog

 

 

That river looks beautiful. Apart from the crabs, what's the fishing like? Anything good?

 

There's a lot of eel in the river which we smoke and eat. Also, a lot of shrimp/prawns. It's about 1.5 kilometers by canoe down the river to the Pacific ocean. O, and tasty clams which I grill on the bbq.

 

 

 

Beautiful BossHog,I wouldn't change a thing.Reminds me a little of Vietnam. Good friends around,guarding the perimeter.really man,its beautiful,squatters and all.

 

I hear ya. It humanizes the situation to see how people live and work here. Maybe it explains my reticence to 'reclaim' the land for my personal use.

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BossHog-Seriously-Is there a spot where my family and I can squat. :biggrin_01:

 

Is there a road going into the big lots across the river?Or would it be travel in by river? Do you have a guess about the land title(clean) and price for 50,000 sqm lots.?

Edited by Baywak
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This is one reason why I would prefer to buy a lot in a gated subdivision.

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thebob

The problem that I see is that by your own admission these are productive people who rely on their location for their livelihood.

 

I can understand that you want to "develop" land that is yours, but I personally think it needs a good leaving alone.

 

If you can find somewhere for them to relocate, and keep access to the river, then that would be the best solution. I think that you need to talk to all of them at the same time, and explain your intentions. As their friends and neighbors are about to be relocated, take care that they do not just relocate to your property.

 

Many of us come here to escape from "the man". It's a wake up call when we realize that to some people we are "the man".

Edited by thebob
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