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designing your own provincial house?


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USCebuana

I know who I'm reaching out to the next time I try to design and build a house! I love the front porch.

Thanks Paddy. It's amazing what you can do with a space with just a little creativity. Hopefully I'll be in the Philippines by then.

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Good luck on having family help you build your house while you aren't there to supervise. It has been a recipe for disaster for many foreigners building something here in the Philippines. Why would yo

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There is nothing wrong with this, but does she let the construction crew do whatever they want to do? I'm thinking she is also an eagle-eyed supervisor who knows how things are supposed to be done?  

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USCebuana

Bigmook, if you really are open to suggestions, take a look at this. It is less than 100 sqm (not including the deck). I think it has everything you are looking for, and all of the plumbing is clustered. The grid you see is in meters.

 

attachicon.gifLinC House 3.jpg

One issue is the bathroom in the middle of the house with no outside opening and another is  the extra expense for columns. It might also look boxlike in front view that's why I added the porch in the house I did. It gives it more character to the house.

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I made a plan that's a bit similar to yours OP. I was going to give it to my brother to give him some ideas for his house. It's 28' x 28' plus a 14' x 8' patio. It works but it's very tight. The bathrooms are not ADA compliant.

 

 

attachicon.gifCottage2424Ren.jpg

attachicon.gifCottage2424.jpg

I like it a lot, any chance you can send me this plan?

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thebob

USCebuana

 

What strikes me most is the size of the rooms. I'd seriously consider building a second floor just for 2 of the bedrooms, to open it all up a bit. Small rooms are hot, and difficult to ventilate.

 

With such small bedrooms, and 2 bathrooms the space is used up by partitions everywhere.. Put the 2 "kids" bedrooms in a loft, open plan the staircase, and make the roof steeper. The extra height will draw heat out of the living area to be vented at the top of the stairwell.

 

The main bedroom just has a CR and shower stall, and the second bathroom can have space for a tub as well. All of the windows need to extend up to ceiling height, so they vent the hot air that is trapped high up.

 

I also think you need more than 2 entrances. In case of fire it is a long and torturous route of escape from the master bathroom.

 

Design it with the loft, stairs and bathroom to be added to the master bedroom at a later stage. Build it as a single story, with a high enough roof and boarded over roof windows. When the tax has been paid, and a certificate of habitation granted, add the stairs, loft bedrooms and second bathroom. This way you minimize the tax and substantially increase the floor area without it showing up on the submitted building plans. The cost can appear to be more reasonable to the permit people for a single bedroom one bathroom house.

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thebob

 

 

my only problem with these types of houses are bugs getting into the property dam I hate creepy crawlees .

 

You've picked the wrong country to live in.

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You've picked the wrong country to live in.

understatement of the year brother lol but I have made my house bug free double meshed windows etc etc always a can of baygon at the ready lol.coming from the u.k to a place like this certainly freaked me out bug wise.

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One issue is the bathroom in the middle of the house with no outside opening and another is  the extra expense for columns. It might also look boxlike in front view that's why I added the porch in the house I did. It gives it more character to the house.

 

Having no windows in a bathroom really isn't a problem as long as you install a good ceiling fan that vents to the outside of the house.

 

A rectangular structure is much stronger in an earthquake than an irregularly shaped structure. It also adds a lot of expense to the house by adding a covered porch out front (because of the additional roof structure and the stresses that puts on the bearing walls or columns)...though it could be done. The house's appearance has a lot more to do with the style in which the exterior is done (Spanish colonial, craftsman, modern, Asian, Victorian, ranch, etc.) than the shape of the structure. You can dress any structure up to make it suit your style. However, If you like front porches, here is the plan with a front porch...

 

post-6379-0-28303300-1383642971_thumb.jpg

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thebob

 

 

A rectangular structure is much stronger in an earthquake than an irregularly shaped structure.

 

I don't understand why you say this. An irregular shaped structure has less resonant frequencies and the ones it has are further apart. Curved walls are stronger than straight ones. But in a post and beam concrete house with hollow block walls the foundation is usually the weakest link.

 

If you are really worried about earthquakes then a "raft" style slab foundation is one of the best. But is probably overkill for a single story structure.

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I wasn't referring to curved walls. I was referring to conventional structures with straight walls. Structures that are built in a "L" or "T" or "H" configurations tend to beat themselves to pieces during earthquakes, The various components of the structure tend to resonate at different frequencies and react independently and differently from the other components. The University of Utah did a study on this, and they concluded that simple rectangular structures were most likely to act as a single unit and survive a strong earthquake. A good example of how an irregularly shaped structure is affected by an earthquake. The building has a main structure with to wings at right angles to the main structure. The main structure suffered little damage, but the wings were heavily damaged. One of them is so structurally damaged, it will have to be demolished.

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USCebuana

I like it a lot, any chance you can send me this plan?

Hi Bigmook, 

 

I'm in the process of creating plan packages for different house styles suited for the Philippines. I charge a fee for the plan package.You can build a house based off those plans but the site plans have to be customized for your particular site. If you're interested you can PM me. Is this ok Paul?

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USCebuana

USCebuana

 

What strikes me most is the size of the rooms. I'd seriously consider building a second floor just for 2 of the bedrooms, to open it all up a bit. Small rooms are hot, and difficult to ventilate.

 

With such small bedrooms, and 2 bathrooms the space is used up by partitions everywhere.. Put the 2 "kids" bedrooms in a loft, open plan the staircase, and make the roof steeper. The extra height will draw heat out of the living area to be vented at the top of the stairwell.

 

The main bedroom just has a CR and shower stall, and the second bathroom can have space for a tub as well. All of the windows need to extend up to ceiling height, so they vent the hot air that is trapped high up.

 

I also think you need more than 2 entrances. In case of fire it is a long and torturous route of escape from the master bathroom.

 

Design it with the loft, stairs and bathroom to be added to the master bedroom at a later stage. Build it as a single story, with a high enough roof and boarded over roof windows. When the tax has been paid, and a certificate of habitation granted, add the stairs, loft bedrooms and second bathroom. This way you minimize the tax and substantially increase the floor area without it showing up on the submitted building plans. The cost can appear to be more reasonable to the permit people for a single bedroom one bathroom house.

 

 

The house has to be 100 sq.m. or less. Lofts don't provide privacy and if you close them off the ceiling is too low and it makes them extremely hot. The house has two entrances. The windows are sliding, you can escape anywhere. In California you're required to have exit windows in sleeping areas. In most cases, second floors are more expensive than single stories.

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USCebuana

Having no windows in a bathroom really isn't a problem as long as you install a good ceiling fan that vents to the outside of the house.

 

A rectangular structure is much stronger in an earthquake than an irregularly shaped structure. It also adds a lot of expense to the house by adding a covered porch out front (because of the additional roof structure and the stresses that puts on the bearing walls or columns)...though it could be done. The house's appearance has a lot more to do with the style in which the exterior is done (Spanish colonial, craftsman, modern, Asian, Victorian, ranch, etc.) than the shape of the structure. You can dress any structure up to make it suit your style. However, If you like front porches, here is the plan with a front porch...

 

attachicon.gifLinC House 4.jpg

Anytime you can provide natural light and ventilation is always better. You have to remember that the fan has to be maintained, is more expensive and requires energy every time you use it. 

 

To be honest it's just a simple home. I think we are over thinking it.

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thebob

Lofts don't provide privacy and if you close them off the ceiling is too low and it makes them extremely hot. The house has two entrances. The windows are sliding, you can escape anywhere. In California you're required to have exit windows in sleeping areas. In most cases, second floors are more expensive than single stories.

 

 

We obviously have different meanings for loft, your design has much too shallow roof for the tropics, the 2 entrances are too close together. California code doesn't apply here. Sliding windows are going to be a security risk. If you have such a small lot then building a second floor is often cheaper per square meter. You still only need one roof.

 

 

To be honest it's just a simple home. I think we are over thinking it.

 

 

I don't think you can ever "over think" building a house. Somebody is going to live there so small changes in layout now can save headaches later. Cebu houses are famous for inattention to detail.

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As the OP I do appreciate everyones assistance and imput...............

small, basic, plain house is all I ever wanted or needed. just 3 bedrooms, 2 crs etc etc (if push comes to shove 2 br & 1 cr)

 

the property is plenty big enough (4000sqm) and the money isnt an issue.but my issue is that under no circumstances will I ever OWN this home..............

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