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Modify my cycle.....


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SkyMan

13 teeth sounds kind of extreme. If you do that you'll feel like you have no acceleration for a while. You'll want to stay in lower gears longer. I suggest going with it for a few weeks at least before deciding if you like it or not. You probably won't at first.

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i don't know , lots of trannys over there

Just went to Honda dealer and they said this: my rear sprocket is currently 51 teeth  ( for low gears and hauling).  He suggested I go 38 teeth and I'd be happy.  They don't do that at Honda but he re

how bout one of these?  

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ILoveCyrus

there is a set: 38 teeth rear with new front sprocket (don't know how many teeth) and new chain to boot.  Mechanic said it would be in the 800-900p range with  install.  Sound like a deal to me.  Apparently, he's done this many times to customers satisfaction.

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Brucewayne

I would go to local Honda shop or other shop where they have sprocket stock for matching to your machine. But like mentioned before if you decrease number, you might have to cut you chain to suit and then if you find new sprocket not giving you what you trying to achieve  and you want to change back , then you up for new chain as well. 

 

Links can be added or subtracted without cutting.

They even make a tool for just that, but I always did it the old fashioned way.

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jtmwatchbiz

i dont know anything about txs...But i do know.there is no replacement for displacement...see if you can can get a big bore kit to slap on to your TXS...then add a big valve head and you should be cooking with gas.

 

 

while your premise of displacement is correct, the mods needed to accomplish that are very expensive and not for a back yard mechanic to do, not to mention the associated mods to the intake system and carburetor to take advantage of the increased breathing and displacement. once the upper engine is modified, there is always the problem of the bottom end handling the stress along with the limited capacity of the transmission and clutch to handle the increased power output. it's smarter money in the long run to start from scratch than to hop-up and modify an existing combination. if you want bigger, then best to start with bigger. i suppose a few gear swaps for the OP would probably be ok and i don't want to make it sound too complicated, but there is also the issue of rpm related valve train dynamics vs cruising speeds that the manufacturer surely has taken into consideration but can be inadvertently mismatched by messing with final drive ratios. engines are designed to match typical sustained cruising speeds vs rpm, and if an engine is run at a constant rpm that is substantially different (lower or higher) than designed, there risks a danger of valve train harmonics causing premature wear...   

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thebob

there is a set: 38 teeth rear with new front sprocket (don't know how many teeth) and new chain to boot.  Mechanic said it would be in the 800-900p range with  install.  Sound like a deal to me.  Apparently, he's done this many times to customers satisfaction.

 

Yep! do it I think that a 36T is optimum but 38T will be much better than standard. Front sprockets are only about 65 pesos and you can change one in about 15 mins if you need to fine tune it later.

 

It will feel like a new bike.

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ILoveCyrus

Bob, I'm told that it will be better gas mileage too.  I was tired of getting run-down by 100cc bikes at top speed.  My bike struggling with 155cc while the 100cc blew past me.  LOL, it was not a good feeling..........

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thebob

Yes you will get better milage. If you look closely at the speedometer, in green numbers there are lines that show gear change speeds. A 36T rear with standard front will let you change gear exactly where those marks are.

 

TMX 155 are totally strangled. The Carb is tiny (19mm), and so is the exhaust pipe. Even without opening up the intake and exhaust ports on the head, bigger pipe and carb really help. Or just have some of the silencer removed.

 

The front forks are also pretty soft. With the bike on the center stand take off the top fork caps one at a time, and add about 100cc of engine oil. In the hardware store you can buy 3/4" pipe nipples, a pair about 1 1/2 inches long on top of the spring fives you a lot more preload and gets rid of the diving under hard braking. I also moved my rear dampers, to the position that the second pair should be in. This lifts the back up about an inch or so.

 

My TMX has a 6 speed transmission from an XL125S and a 26mm Carb with a custom stainless pipe from Motofix (under the bridge in Talisay). I haven't done a big bore kit yet, I'm still looking for an old head to work on first, but I have an old cylinder, and intend to use a Honda stationary engine piston and liner.

 

Honda in their wisdom used lots of the same parts in all of their bikes from 125cc to 200cc. So it is possible to modify these bikes using only  Honda parts. Maximum bore and stroke you could take one of these engines out to 220cc, but I doubt if you would be able to start it without breaking the kickstart quadrant.

 

Unfortunately electric start isn't possible because you would need to change the crankcase half with the engine number on it.

 

I'm a huge fan of TMX 155's. Much better bikes than XR200's.

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Canuck Joe

while your premise of displacement is correct, the mods needed to accomplish that are very expensive and not for a back yard mechanic to do, not to mention the associated mods to the intake system and carburetor to take advantage of the increased breathing and displacement. once the upper engine is modified, there is always the problem of the bottom end handling the stress along with the limited capacity of the transmission and clutch to handle the increased power output. it's smarter money in the long run to start from scratch than to hop-up and modify an existing combination. if you want bigger, then best to start with bigger. i suppose a few gear swaps for the OP would probably be ok and i don't want to make it sound too complicated, but there is also the issue of rpm related valve train dynamics vs cruising speeds that the manufacturer surely has taken into consideration but can be inadvertently mismatched by messing with final drive ratios. engines are designed to match typical sustained cruising speeds vs rpm, and if an engine is run at a constant rpm that is substantially different (lower or higher) than designed, there risks a danger of valve train harmonics causing premature wear...

 

I can only relay info from my recent experience with my yamaha mio. Bored and stroked to 185 cc two years ago and still pulling really hard. Bottom end and all. Yes I have to gas up and oil up often.

The bike in OP I have no idea about.

On my limited budget I have fun everytime I twist the throttle....my wants for a much better and bigger Japanese or euro bike are very very strong.

Time to go back home and work or be with my family....I wish I could have both. :-)

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ILoveCyrus

Ok, now my mechanic said to go with 36 teeth rear and 16 teeth front sprocket....new chain too. 

 

I sure hope I don't get buyer's remorse..........!!!

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I'm a huge fan of TMX 155's. Much better bikes than XR200's.

 

Sacrilege, I say!! The XR200 is a far superior motorbike!

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ILoveCyrus

Oh oh.....we have a fight of words brewing.....!!!

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thebob

Ok, now my mechanic said to go with 36 teeth rear and 16 teeth front sprocket....new chain too. 

 

I sure hope I don't get buyer's remorse..........!!!

 

Just do it already. You'll love it.

 

Sacrilege, I say!! The XR200 is a far superior motorbike!

 

Horrid tall expensive bikes, they make a tiny bit more power than a TMX and weigh a lot more, use more petrol, silly knobby tires that hardly get used, and make the wet blacktop treacherous. Plenty of ground clearance… but why?

 

TMX's go on for ever, you can get parts for them anywhere. Every mechanic in the country has worked on one. They have a sort of retro chic. When you get a long way from the highway, up the top of a mountain, or wherever. It's a TMX you see with 5 passengers, 2 sacks of rice, a goat and pig on it. It is the definitive pinnoy bike.

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Oh oh.....we have a fight of words brewing.....!!!

 

Fight? Ha! Fight? Ha! Ha!

 

Have you ever met Theb? He's as skinny as a rail. I could knock him over by lookin' at him. :D 

 

Naturally, I wouldn't ever consider that, though. he has provided many a beer when I was visiting with him.

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Horrid tall expensive bikes, they make a tiny bit more power than a TMX and weigh a lot more, use more petrol, silly knobby tires that hardly get used, and make the wet blacktop treacherous. Plenty of ground clearance… but why?

 

TMX's go on for ever, you can get parts for them anywhere. Every mechanic in the country has worked on one. They have a sort of retro chic. When you get a long way from the highway, up the top of a mountain, or wherever. It's a TMX you see with 5 passengers, 2 sacks of rice, a goat and pig on it. It is the definitive pinnoy bike.

 

Trust me, mate. Mine got used off-road, a LOT! 

 

Granted, the TMX is geared low to haul. But, I can't say it gets any better, or worse, fuel economy. 

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