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Modify my cycle.....


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shadow

TMX has 4 speeds...why bump to 6 speed and not 5?

Availability of parts! The gear cluster out of some models of XL will fit with modifications.

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i don't know , lots of trannys over there

Just went to Honda dealer and they said this: my rear sprocket is currently 51 teeth  ( for low gears and hauling).  He suggested I go 38 teeth and I'd be happy.  They don't do that at Honda but he re

how bout one of these?  

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bahalina buong

As Shadow mentioned, it's much easier (and cheaper) to just go up one tooth on the countershaft sprocket.   This is assuming your rear sprocket is still in good condition and not needing to be replaced anyway.  And unless you are hauling around your entire extended family, your coconut harvest and a 50 kilo bag of rice (all at the same time!), the bike will still be geared low enough for blast off.  There was a familly near here that got totally wiped out a few years ago when the idiot driver tried to pull out onto the highway, up an incline, in front a bus moving at full speed.  Probably wishing he had LOWER gearing at the time.  But you'll be fine if it's just two of you, and I'm sure you're smarter than that guy!  

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ILoveCyrus

As Shadow mentioned, it's much easier (and cheaper) to just go up one tooth on the countershaft sprocket.   This is assuming your rear sprocket is still in good condition and not needing to be replaced anyway.

 

Wait.... 1 tooth up; smaller sproc; bigger sproc.........???  I'm getting conflicting advice here from several people.

 

Does smaller mean 1 more tooth?  hmmmmmm, kinda confused at this point.

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bahalina buong

The teeth on the different size sprockets are the same size so they can fit the same chain size.  So more teeth means a bigger sprocket.  You want either one tooth more on the front or 3-4 teeth less (depending on your sprocket ratios) on the rear to get the same effect.  Sorry for the confusion.

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Nangulo

It's easier to change the sprocket on the rear wheel than it is to change the sprocket on the countershaft.

 

I did this to my TMX 155 Honda.  Also had to remove several links from the chain.

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shadow

Wait.... 1 tooth up; smaller sproc; bigger sproc.........???  I'm getting conflicting advice here from several people.

 

Does smaller mean 1 more tooth?  hmmmmmm, kinda confused at this point.

I think everyone is pretty much on the same page, you are just not grasping the mechanics of what they are telling you.

 

Bigger sprocket in front (one tooth up) and smaller sprocket in back will either one gear you higher. Likewise, smaller in front (less teeth) or bigger in rear (more teeth) will gear you lower.

 

It is easier to change a front sprocket than a rear. For the front, often you will not have to alter the chain length, whereas to change a rear sprocket you most certainly will. "One tooth up" on the front sprocket will gear you up approximately 8% depending on how many teeth are on it, whereas "one tooth down" on the rear will only change your gear ration about 2%.

 

Study the mechanics of a ten speed bicycle, the same concept applies.

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shadow

It's easier to change the sprocket on the rear wheel than it is to change the sprocket on the countershaft.

 

I did this to my TMX 155 Honda.  Also had to remove several links from the chain.

This may be true on some, but certainly not on my YBR. I can change the front sprocket in less than ten minutes, and not have to alter the chain length (4 bolts and the sprocket is in my hand). To change the rear sprocket is a much more involved task and involves altering the chain length.

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I would go to local Honda shop or other shop where they have sprocket stock for matching to your machine. But like mentioned before if you decrease number, you might have to cut you chain to suit and then if you find new sprocket not giving you what you trying to achieve  and you want to change back , then you up for new chain as well. 

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Having played around with this type of "change gearing" stuff a fair bit, unless you are doing drastic teeth adding or subtracting, chain length alteration is unlikely.

In my experience up to 3 teeth may be added subtracted without any chain length alteration. The necessary adjustment is take up by the rear wheel axle adjusters. Generally the slot in the axle plate is at least 2-3 axle diameters in length, giving a fair range of adjustment.

For a typical 5/8" x 3/8" chain, each tooth either adds or subtracts 5/8" in overall chain length. As the chain is double length (ie a top and bottom run) the adjustment is actually half the 5/8" in the horizontal plane. So each tooth needs the axle to move 5/16' either fowards or backwards.

Hope that all makes sense.

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shadow

Having played around with this type of "change gearing" stuff a fair bit, unless you are doing drastic teeth adding or subtracting, chain length alteration is unlikely.

In my experience up to 3 teeth may be added subtracted without any chain length alteration. The necessary adjustment is take up by the rear wheel axle adjusters. Generally the slot in the axle plate is at least 2-3 axle diameters in length, giving a fair range of adjustment.

For a typical 5/8" x 3/8" chain, each tooth either adds or subtracts 5/8" in overall chain length. As the chain is double length (ie a top and bottom run) the adjustment is actually half the 5/8" in the horizontal plane. So each tooth needs the axle to move 5/16' either fowards or backwards.

Hope that all makes sense.

True enough. However in the case of the OP I doubt that 3 teeth smaller sprocket in the rear is going to change his gearing enough to really be noticed.

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Honda TMX.... I understand that is has low gearing for hauling power.

 

Not think Honda tried to make this one a speedster bike in the first place, just a low maintenance all arounder .

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ILoveCyrus

So my 155cc is slower on top end than 100-125cc bikes.......... that sucks.

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Canuck Joe

i dont know anything about txs...But i do know.there is no replacement for displacement...see if you can can get a big bore kit to slap on to your TXS...then add a big valve head and you should be cooking with gas.

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ILoveCyrus

Just went to Honda dealer and they said this: my rear sprocket is currently 51 teeth  ( for low gears and hauling).  He suggested I go 38 teeth and I'd be happy.  They don't do that at Honda but he referred me to other outfits.  Nice guys at Honda.

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