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Vegetables and Fruits Grown in the Philippines


JamesMusslewhite

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JamesMusslewhite

..... Strawberries, another cold climate fruit, is also grown and sold in Baguio.

The mountainous areas Benguet is called the "Salad Bowl of the Philippines", Baguio, and Davao easily grow crops of cabbage, lettuce, and strawberries which are considered more cooler climate crops due to these area's milder climates at elevation.

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So you want to grow a garden or farm crop in the Philippines? What the heck grows here?    When wanting to decide what vegetables and fruits grow well for your farm and garden needs you have to do

They sell 20 foot lengths of white 3/4 inch PVC water pipe in Cebu. I have seen it in a hardware outlet on Mactan. it can be used to make an easy 12 foot X 50 foot rain house that will allow you to gr

Fruit Trees of the Philippines Alvocado (Persea americana) Banana (Saging (Musa sapientum) Barbados nut or Purging nut(Jatropha) (Jatropha curcas) Bilimbi (Kamias) (Averrhoa bilimbi) Breadfruit (

 

 

that is the only "nut section" I have

 

I am very sorry for your loss.

 

Also, it looks as though the greenhouses in the photos are enclosed on the ends with rather small vents. The heat inside must become intense even in the shade of the trees- found that a huge problem in Maine for crying out loud. I can't imagine the tropical crops like it that hot.

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JamesMusslewhite

I am very sorry for your loss.

 

Also, it looks as though the greenhouses in the photos are enclosed on the ends with rather small vents. The heat inside must become intense even in the shade of the trees- found that a huge problem in Maine for crying out loud. I can't imagine the tropical crops like it that hot.

They were set up for winter in South Texas when just opening the doors at either end and using the fans was enough to vent the heat during the day as needed. During the warm seasons the plastic was completely removed from the ends so heat was not a problem as it quickly vented. Here in the tropics there is no need to cap the ends as the poly covering is merely to allow crop production during the rainy season when it almost rains fours months straight here in Surigao. The poly covering allows for year around crop production.

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msmith524

Thanks for the list, but if all those things are grown in the R.P. then all I can say is that Filipino producers either do not know how to farm/produce effiiciently or they are ripping people off. Because the prices of several things, just at a glance are twice as high as in the USA. Brocolli is one example, there are many more. I am not comparing prices in NYC to prices in Cebu. I am comparing prices in city of one million in sw usa to prices in cebu and elsewhere in R.P. A better list would be food you can buy here more cheaply than USA. The well known examples are pinneapple, coconut, fish as a few and there are not that many. Most things are HIGHER here, not lower.

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Salad Mallow (Corchorus olitorius)

 

Stumbled on this one. You have Chinese mallow listed but that appears to be more of an herb/medicinal.

Related to okra, cotton and cacao should grow well in the Phils. Ah, yes,

In the Philippines, C. olitorius is known as saluyot. It is commonly consumed as a leafy vegetable together with bamboo shoots.[10]

(My wife says in Visayan it's marangog.) AKA Jute- have heard of that.

Very nutritious apparently, probably a good animal feed. (3% potassium by weight!)

 

This plant, which looks quite innocent and quite insignificant in appearance and could easily be mistaken for a weed is actually a treasure house of healthy food elements. It is well known for being: 20.4% green leaf protein, and very high in the mineral potassium – 3068mg per 100 grams – which is probably the highest in any garden crop you can grow. Also calcium 1432mg, phosphorus 703mg, magnesium 284mg, sulphur 235mg, sodium 12mg, silica 8mg, iron 7mg, zinc 4mg, manganese 3mg.
Vitamins: A at 3500 IU per 100 grams of leaves, C 64mg, plus B1, B2, B3. It is also considered to be a tonic, anti-diarrheal, anti-tussive, demulcent, expectorant, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and digestive. The leaves can be eaten as a salad or cooked as spinach; they can also be dried stored and made into a tea as a tonic or re-hydrated for cooking when needed.
The versatility of this crop, combined with its nutritional value and the fact that it is extremely easy to grow and its extended storage capability make this an ideal main crop addition to the list of permaculture main crops of special importance.
http://permaculturenews.org/2009/05/06/permaculture-main-crops-of-special-importance-salad-mallow/

 

NEW—Corchorus olitorius. (b,h) CORCH-18. Packet: $2.50
'TOSSA JUTE', 'MELUKHIE'. Annual to 6 feet with large pointed 2 - 6" leaves and yellow 1/2" flowers.
India. Widely cultivated for fiber and food. The young shoots and leaves are an ancient vegetable,
eaten by the Egyptians, mentioned by Pliny, and are now widely eaten in the Middle East, India,
Africa, and the Americas. The leaves are an excellent potherb, can be eaten as a salad when young,
and can be dried for winter use in soups, etc.

Annual but self seeding

 

If seed capsules are not
picked at maturity, the plant will self-seed, and seedlings will come
up next season, providing a supply of lush, nutritious leaves.
http://www.reclaimaustralia.net/Herbs_are_special/SALAD%20MALLOW.pdf

 

Likes a lot of nitrogen (manure) but

 

Cattle like to eat mallow and mallow is very popular with the bees because of nectar and pollen.
In agriculture mallow can be used as fertilizer and as energy crop mallow is ideal because it can be burned and also used for biogas.
Mallow is very willing to grow and thrive in all kinds of land - also very nutrient-poor soil. Mallow multiplies readily and spread quickly.
Because of the plant's rapid growth it can be used to fight weeds. Mallow has very strong roots and can therefore prevent erosion.

http://www.folkecenter.net/gb/rd/biogas/biomass-energy-crops/mallow_energycrop/

 

Sounds like may even be invasive!

Edited by hchoate
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BossHog

Some kid walked into the yard today, bashfully handed me a cellophane bag, said 'thank you'  and then ran away..

 

A half dozen chico (sapodilla) fruits. Some were a little over ripe but the rest perfect. Ate them all.

 

Don't see them around here much.

 

Wonder who the kid was.

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JamesMusslewhite

I am looking for "wasabi" seeds now as I feel they can grow quite well in the Philippines if you have the right water conditions on your property.

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JamesMusslewhite

so where be the avocado 

First one listed in the OP list under "Fruits". :biggrin_01: 

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smokey

First one listed in the OP list under "Fruits". :biggrin_01:

i am looking for one green avocado oh and some sour cream  

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thebob

 

 

I am looking for "wasabi" seeds now as I feel they can grow quite well in the Philippines if you have the right water conditions on your property.

 

I've only ever seen it growing in very cold running water.

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David_LivinginTalisay

James,

 

I did not see  pitaya /pɨˈt.ə/ or pitahaya / (Dragonfruitlisted.

Is that just an omission, or a problem growing Pitahaya (Dragonfruit) in Cebu?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitaya

pitaya /pɨˈt.ə/ or pitahaya / ˌpɪtəˈh.ə/ is the fruit of several cactus species


"Pitaya" usually refers to fruit of the genusStenocereus, while "Pitahaya" or "Dragonfruit" always refers to fruit of the genus Hylocereus.

 


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JamesMusslewhite

James,

 

I did not see  pitaya /pɨˈt.ə/ or pitahaya / (Dragonfruitlisted.

 

Is that just an omission, or a problem growing Pitahaya (Dragonfruit) in Cebu?

 

 

Just never came across it as i was compiling the list through the source I was using. It appears it grow well here and it seems it be an emerging cottage industry in Ilocos Norte so i do not see why it will not do equally well in Cebu. I will try to find a source page that has sufficient information and will add the name and a link to the information. I will try to do that be tomorrow afternoon as the internet is giving us fits in this area tonight.

 

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/443189/dragon-fruit-takes-over-ilocos-norte

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JamesMusslewhite

I've only ever seen it growing in very cold running water.

I have been looking at a new variety called "Daruma" which is suppose to be better suited to grow in warmer climates. The area were I want to grow it is at the back of my property and rather close to the artesian source and has a reasonable natural tree canopy which will help minimize the temperature of the water flowing through their grow beds . I also can utilize the natural shade from the caladiums and construct 80% sun screen covering along both sides of the caladium field. Wasabii is an odd plant because it actually grows faster in cooler weather and slower in the heat, which means instead of harvesting at 2 years it may be on a three year cycle. The advantage is the larger caladium varieties I grow also take three years to mature for harvest so they could be natural intercropping companions.  I just can not resist giving it a try to see if i can get it to work.

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