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beasties in the water


Sonny

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When snorkeling in the Phils,  I always had an urge to handle some of the unusual critters that I encountered in the water. A rare occurrence of common sense usually persuaded me to keep my (bare) hands to meself except for an occasional starfish or sea cucumber.  Always wanted to snatch up one of those spiny urchins but never had the guts.  Some on this forum might profit from the combined wisdom of experience from those who know about such things.  Any observations or warnings ?

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That's putting your life in your own hands, quite literally. Such innocent looking, beautiful creatures, but so deadly. Reminds me of women.

The box jellyfish causes between 20-40 deaths annually in the Philippines:   http://redang.org/fishdanger.htm  

I found (3) different Blue Ringed Octupus within the same week on Siquijor island.  Here are the photos of them in my hand.  I thought they were babies because of their small size (3.5" in dia).  Than

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When diving I have kind of the same curiosity, but I'm keenly aware that there are a lot of things down there that can seriously hurt you.  The prettier they are, the more likely they are to be poisonous.  One day I hope to make an extended dive trip where I can learn and then remember the names and characteristics of the sea life in the area.

 

One thing to never touch are the lionfish, very common, it's actually been rare for me NOT to see one of the dives I've done in the Philippines.

 

lionfish.jpg?w=610

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spiny sea urchins are not poisonous, just handle them very carefuly as the spines are made of calcium and are very brittle,

If looked at under a magnifying glass they resemble a ring nail (christmas tree), if you get one in your finger they generaly snap off level with the skin and are an absolute pig to get out,

a bit like a fish hook,

 

If you come accross a blue ringed octopus give the damn thing a very wide birth, they are deadly

 

Cleaner shrimps are facinating to watch, they have brown flanks with a bright red back with a white stripe down the midle, they tickle too if you let one manicure your hand, they will remove any dead skin and parasites you may have.

 

i used to have a 240 gallon marine tank in my last home, had all sorts of amazing sea life in there

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Kabisay-an gid

 

spiny sea urchins are not poisonous, just handle them very carefuly as the spines are made of calcium and are very brittle,

 

The Fire Urchin is venomous, and though not often deadly, will deliver an extremely painful sting that will have you headed for a medical facility in short order. One would have to be more than a tad daft to handle one.

 

01362505.jpg

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The only warning I ever got was to never, ever touch a cone shell.  Evidently they can reach any place on their shell and they are very fast.  Often deadly.

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Cover up for sure. Arms legs, head if you can. You never see pro divers here uncovered in the water, only tourists.

 

If you get a sea urchin spine that's difficult beat it with coke bottle to fragment it. Sea snakes rank next to blue ring octopus but are usually just curious. Titan triggers are evil if a boat drops you near a coral bed to snorkel . With vision like an up ended pyramid the only safe place is down.

 

Worst thing is the pig shit and effluent pouring into the sea. When I docked Monday, Cebu port was stinking real bad.

 

Sea urchins? Collect as many as you can. Put them in a mesh bag and beat them aside the boat. Be sure to bring a spoon and lots of rice. Scoop out those eggs! If the waters clean you have the best and cheapest unizushi.

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The Fire Urchin is venomous, and though not often deadly, will deliver an extremely painful sting that will have you headed for a medical facility in short order. One would have to be more than a tad daft to handle one.

 

01362505.jpg

 

True, but they are definitely some of the most beautiful animals in the ocean here. There are actually a few different varieties of them with different patterns. The best rule is to not touch anything unless you already know it's harmless. Don't even touch rocks. They could be a stonefish. Truthfully, if you are touching things in the ocean, you are likely killing a lot of stuff. Most coral will die if touched. The stuff that won't die when touched, will probably try to kill you.

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One thing to never touch are the lionfish

 

What can it do to you?

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The only warning I ever got was to never, ever touch a cone shell.

 

Is this what you are talking about, Sonny? I would have never thought a snail would be so dangerous.

 

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What can it do to you?

 

They can cause you some serious pain.

 

Supposedly, they are really good to eat. 

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What can it do to you?

 

Here is what they can do...

 

Lionfish, like many vibrantly colorful animals, often use their colors to warn other animals that they are dangerous. When the lionfish splays its fins, a series of venomous, needle-like spines appear. Bumping into one of these fish will cause extreme pain as a powerful neurotoxin is released into the diver's skin. Unless a serious allergic reaction to the toxin occurs, fatalities in humans from lionfish venom are uncommon. However, some of the side effects of a lionfish sting include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, fever, and difficulty breathing. Needless to say, a diver should end his dive if stung by a lionfish.

 

http://scuba.about.com/od/ConservationandDiving/p/First-Aid-And-Facts-About-Lionfish-Stings-For-Divers.htm

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Lionfish, like many vibrantly colorful animals, often use their colors to warn other animals that they are dangerous. When the lionfish splays its fins, a series of venomous, needle-like spines appear. Bumping into one of these fish will cause extreme pain as a powerful neurotoxin is released into the diver's skin. Unless a serious allergic reaction to the toxin occurs, fatalities in humans from lionfish venom are uncommon. However, some of the side effects of a lionfish sting include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, fever, and difficulty breathing. Needless to say, a diver should end his dive if stung by a lionfish.

 

I was handling a lionfish while snorkling in the waters outside our house in Argao a couple of years ago.  They are very slow and graceful fish.   Now I know not to be such an idiot, thanks.

 

 

More good advice is don't forget to take off your wedding ring while swimming.  Barracuda have been known to shred peoples hands and arms after being attracted to what they thought were small fish.

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I always dive in a full Radiator, booties, gloves and hood.  Stripping down after is also a careful practice as some trails can get attached to your gear and will still have residual painful affects, gloves come off Last!!

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What can it do to you?

Friend was cleaning an aquarium in his shop and got stung by a lion/turkey fish.

 

His forearm came up blue and as big as his thigh. A week in hospital and some kind of anti snake venom and he was released.

 

Lol I used to hand feed my moray eels but let go of the fish quickly.

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