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Mindanao Escape Map


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BossHog

Recently received from a relative in the states:

 

An escape map for Mindanao (AAF cloth chart) that was issued to US aircrews during WWII.

 

It's printed on silk and has a lot of creases. Obviously it was stored folded up since who knows when. The colors are still quite good though.

 

Scared of using a clothes iron on it to get the creases out.

 

I'd like to frame it under glass for display. However the reverse has a map of Borneo on it which I'd hate to cover up. Any ideas on how to display/preserve this thing?

 

 

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I have no idea, regarding your question. But, I would love to see a photo of it. 

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That is an interesting piece of history.

 

I would research the methods of removing the creases and give the display options a lot of thought.

Better to keep it safe until you can do something that will not harm it, rather than act in haste and ruin it.

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I'm no expert but I would think some kind of light steam might loosen the folds in the fibers without damaging the color.

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jtmwatchbiz

for me i would lay it out (depending on the size) on top of a piece of clean dry glass, then rest another piece of glass on top with a few books resting on the top glass to give it some weight. i\m sure over the course of a few weeks the creases would flatten out without risking any other intrusive contact method.  

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BossHog

It's about 3' by 2'.

 

Unfortunately, the very northeastern part of Mindanao where i live doesn't appear on the map.

 

I'll get some pictures up when the kiddo finds the camera.

 

My uncle sent it. His father, my maternal grandfather, was a B-24 pilot in the Pacific during the war, so I'm assuming it was his. Need to find out more.

 

Googling turned this up:

 

http://www.etsy.com/listing/156381678/wwii-aaf-silk-chart-philippine-series

 

It's the same series. They must have issued a lot of these and it doesn't appear particularly valuable. Very cool though.

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these sorts of maps were of course important and made to withstand a lot of abuse.  just toss it in with the laundry and let your maid with her scrub brush work the creases out.

or,

pay no attention to me whatsoever, except, however you decide to display it (i like tinbum's idea) be careful in exposing it to too much light.   wouldn't want it to fade. 

i have several items from my grandfather, a pilot in ww1.  things made of cloth, paper, and leather (his flying helmet).  i won't bring any of them here, this climate just seems so harsh on things.

 

looking forward to the pics.

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BossHog

 Found this:


                "In fact, C-34/C-35 was the second most printed chart during the
                war, with over 230,000 copies ordered from the printers"

 

at this site:

 

http://www.escape-maps.com/escape_maps/history_of_wwii_us_cloth_escape_maps.htm

 

The one I have is c-43/c-44 but it does appear they made a lot of these maps.

 

Maybe it isn't silk. I just assumed so. Very soft but maybe due to age and wear.

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i searched ebay for c-43/c-44 escape map.  didn't find yours, but there are some others.  from the description of the first that showed up:

 

For sale a British Second World War “Silk” escape map of China and French Indo-China. Numbers 44/L and 44/M (Date 1944).
Double-sided. Coloured.


 

The British Directorate of Military Intelligence Section 9, known as MI9, was the department of the War Office tasked with aiding resistance fighters in enemy occupied territory, and supporting special   forces and recovering Allied aircrews behind enemy lines. In 1944, the MI9 unit located in India ordered the “44 series” maps to cover Southeast Asia.


Escape maps throughout the early part of the war were printed on pure silk, however, from 1943 onwards, silk was becoming scarce, and
so maps began to be printed on a substitute fabric known as cuprammonuium, a form of rayon commonly known as “Bemberg Silk” or
“copper rayon”, with many of the properties of natural silk...

 

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Ever thought of asking the archival department of the National Muesum?  I am sure they have similar items and could advise you on the best way to accomplish what you need on this item.

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  • Admin (Retired)

be careful better to find a top notch preservation guy than try to do it yourself you may do more harm than good trying to "improve" it

 

at the very least being as where you are people with the skills you need might be in short supply

 

see if you can get it put between glass but not against the glass you could perhaps get a two sided frame built i would also want some uv protection on the glass since you want to display it 

 

if you can't find good uv protectant glass or glass covering ... krylon and some others make a uv protectant clear coat you can spray on to glass .. though it's not really meant for that

 

just coat the glass try a few coats see if it stays clear for you not blurry obviously spray the glass before you put anything together and let it dry before you do put it all togehter

 

there are also plastic sleeves made usually for autographed 8 by 10's and suck that are made to not stick been a while since i've gotten any though so you would have to look around or better mat it so it won't be squished at all cept on the edges for the matting

 

a good framing place who can seal it up air tight would be even better cause of the temp and humidity there.. ,museums usually remove all oxygen and replace it with an inert gas

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  • Admin (Retired)

what i would do is get or make basically a glass box so you have a half inch or inch on each side of the map get some uv protectant and coat it wll.. or get a frame made in a similar fashion.. then just mat the top edge or two top corners and basically let it hang free in that box .. there is no real perfect way to do it but you can basically damage it as little as possible and still display it in this way

 

if it's a glass box or plexiglass box you can mat or attach the top of the map to an almost cork in a wine bottle type top enclosure that just pops on you could even run a bead of calk around the top edge.. that can be carved out of wood you could pin the top coners right to the wood but i hate damaging pieces at all 

 

actually you could embed two small magnets in to the wood glue them in place inset and use two more magnets to hold the map in place .. no damage that way and always easily removable if you need to use it to make a quick escape

 

they make fake earrings like that now that are just a magnet on each side of the earlobe .. something similar to that .. they would be strong enough easily

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