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Jay

Beware of bad cans

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Jay

The other day I went to fix some (canned) sisig and scrambled eggs for dinner, and I noticed that when I pressed on the tops of the cans there was a bit of movement as though the can wasn't sealed. Into the garbage they went. Then just last Friday when we were doing our biweekly grocery shopping I noticed that several other cans in the store were the same way: not just sisig (Argentina Spicy Sisig, FYI) but also sardines. Most cans were OK, just a few of them were bad. This was at Colonade in Mandaue by the way, though I imagine that if manufacturers are shipping out poorly-sealed canned foods you could accidentally get them at any store.

 

We reported it to one of the floor managers but she didn't do anything other than have one of the stockboys return the puffy cans we'd given her to their shelves: apparently they don't care if their customers die of botulism and/or are ignorant about how the canning process preserves food and prevents spoiling (it's the vacuum.) So just be on the alert when you buy canned goods: always press on the top of every can and check for movement before buying it, and again before opening it at home.

 

FYI, my mother used to can her own fruits and vegetables, and she taught me another trick for double-checking the seals which also works with commercially-canned items: just put a little water on top of the can before you pierce it with a can opener, and tilt the can so the water is concentrated at the spot the opener's about to pierce. If there was a good seal you'll hear a kind of sucking or kissing noise as some of the water gets sucked into the can from its vacuum when you break the seal with the opener. No kissing noise means no vacuum, which means that the contents shouldn't be trusted to be safe to eat.

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JasonEcos

Good topic. Don't trust the name brands from home either. We had some Hunts spaghetti sauce with a bad seal and there was an entire batch of Totinos nacho cheese sauce at Gaisano Basak that was bad. I didn't notice until I dipped a chip and it tasted "off". Looked at the unopened cheese we bought and no vacuum. A few weeks later we returned to the store and all the cans of cheese had a bad seal.

 

It furthers my conspiracy theory that some companies send their defects here.

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smokey

Good topic. Don't trust the name brands from home either. We had some Hunts spaghetti sauce with a bad seal and there was an entire batch of Totinos nacho cheese sauce at Gaisano Basak that was bad. I didn't notice until I dipped a chip and it tasted "off". Looked at the unopened cheese we bought and no vacuum. A few weeks later we returned to the store and all the cans of cheese had a bad seal.

 

It furthers my conspiracy theory that some companies send their defects here.

 you mean like Ford Expeditions ...  and then sell them for only 100,000 us 

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panther

Its not just canned foods ,last night we sent our boy to the local sari sari store to buy 2 tubs of ice cream.we opened one of them and found the contents half eaten WTF someone must have eaten half the tub and put it at the bottom of the freezer I was gobsmacked the store owner just shrugged the shoulders as if it was normal practice.

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smokey

Its not just canned foods ,last night we sent our boy to the local sari sari store to buy 2 tubs of ice cream.we opened one of them and found the contents half eaten WTF someone must have eaten half the tub and put it at the bottom of the freezer I was gobsmacked the store owner just shrugged the shoulders as if it was normal practice.

normal for who ....  if its not sealed how do you know what acts were performed before selling 

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panther

normal for who ....  if its not sealed how do you know what acts were performed before selling 

normal to sell damaged food stuffs or out of date cookies and snacks that have gone soft etc

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Kreole

normal to sell damaged food stuffs or out of date cookies and snacks that have gone soft etc

After living here over a 4 year period, I am in no way surprised about the callous attitude that store or restaurant owners have about their defective products.  The image of them shrugging their shoulders and putting the products back on the shelf says it all.  They could not give a feck if someone dies or is made sick.  I have never encountered this attitude in all of my travels through most of Latin America and the Caribbean.  At least there the store owners "pretend" that they care.  The filipino owners or managers don't even make that effort.  And if you get sick, then they say it is your fault or that you are the only one to complain.  It is not worth the effort to even talk to them.  It reminds me of the Chinese who are famous now for selling tainted food products that kill and sicken many.  At least I am pleased to know that some of them are given the death penalty in China.  In the Philippines, they would not even be cited; just lots of noise and then no action or followup.  That said, I do feel sorry for the poor sari sari store owners who are living on the edge, and any loss of product can mean the end of their business. 

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Brucewayne

Also, watch out for Hunts pork and beans in the little plastic pouches.

We boughtv 10-12 of them last month and every one of them had black rot in them.

Stunk to high heaven!

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Domain

The other day I went to fix some (canned) sisig and scrambled eggs for dinner, and I noticed that when I pressed on the tops of the cans there was a bit of movement as though the can wasn't sealed. Into the garbage they went. Then just last Friday when we were doing our biweekly grocery shopping I noticed that several other cans in the store were the same way: not just sisig (Argentina Spicy Sisig, FYI) but also sardines. Most cans were OK, just a few of them were bad. This was at Colonade in Mandaue by the way, though I imagine that if manufacturers are shipping out poorly-sealed canned foods you could accidentally get them at any store.

 

We reported it to one of the floor managers but she didn't do anything other than have one of the stockboys return the puffy cans we'd given her to their shelves: apparently they don't care if their customers die of botulism and/or are ignorant about how the canning process preserves food and prevents spoiling (it's the vacuum.) So just be on the alert when you buy canned goods: always press on the top of every can and check for movement before buying it, and again before opening it at home.

 

FYI, my mother used to can her own fruits and vegetables, and she taught me another trick for double-checking the seals which also works with commercially-canned items: just put a little water on top of the can before you pierce it with a can opener, and tilt the can so the water is concentrated at the spot the opener's about to pierce. If there was a good seal you'll hear a kind of sucking or kissing noise as some of the water gets sucked into the can from its vacuum when you break the seal with the opener. No kissing noise means no vacuum, which means that the contents shouldn't be trusted to be safe to eat.

Goodr info. I'll use it when shopping.

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RogerDat

Greetings! Got stuck one time on the Hunts BBQ beans, never bought it since. i grew up in S.C. and we used to go to Pigly Wiggley, Half of what they sold was railroad salvage, so you always gave the cans a good look. I have had only a few bad items here on Mactan, so I am not too concerned about the stores. i have pointed out a few dozen items that were bad, the staff took most to back room, if they stayed there i do not know.

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johnboy999

We had a case last month, in Alcoy where I live, where 2 sisters died from food poisoning and the other two were seriously ill in hospital after eating a tin of beef loaf. The tin was apparently undamaged and dated 2015 but they died from suspected botulism! Needless to say, we've not bought anything like that since the news came out. Definitely makes you think......

 

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/cebu/local-news/2013/08/14/botulism-suspected-death-2-siblings-alcoy-297749

 

Botulism suspected for death of 2 siblings from Alcoy

 

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

 
 
HEALTH officials will test the empty can of processed meat that a brood of four in Barangay Poblacion in Alcoy town ate, resulting in the death of two siblings last Monday, for a toxin called botulinum.
 
Reginal Epidemiologist Rennan Cimafranca of the Department of Health (DOH) 7 said the symptoms—general cramps, severe abdominal pain and vomiting—exhibited by the Yman siblings are consistent with botulism.
 
Botulinum is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, which is found in soil. It may be found in home-canned food or improperly canned commercial food, according to foodsafety.gov.
 
Cimafranca said the DOH team checked the batch number of the canned food and looked for others from the same production batch at a store in Alcoy town.
 
Cimafranca said the stocks of canned food were arranged on a bamboo table inside the store.
 
Samples
 
The DOH team bought some samples with the same batch number for testing by the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) in Mandaue.
 
“The empty can looked like it's new. Its expiry date is 2015. There was no rust (on the can),” he told Sun.Star Cebu in a phone interview.
 
“We are considering a toxin or chemical (as the cause of the Yman sibling's illness).
 
We are inclined to consider toxins. But we should also consider that we do not know how the food was cooked,” he said. He stressed that tests have to be made before the health department can make conclusions.
 
The website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that “all forms of botulism can be fatal and are considered medical emergencies.” “Foodborne botulism is a public health emergency because many people can be poisoned by eating a contaminated food.”
 
Heating
 
The investigation by the health department in coordination with NMIS would be completed between one and two weeks, said Cimafranca.
 
He said that toxins cannot be removed by heating.
 
In a separate interview, Alcoy Mayor Nicomedes said he will call for a special session with Municipal Council today to discuss the Yman case.
 
Liza Marie Yman, 6, died on Aug. 6 while Levy Mae, 18, died on Aug. 10 at a private hospital in Cebu City after eating a can of processed meat.
 
Two other Yman siblings are confined in a hospital in Manila.

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hyaku

My father bought canned sardines on offer. Blue can, picture of a sardine on it. Next time he went shopping mother said, "Get some more of those sardines, they are delicious. He could not find the display and asked where they we're. "Over there sir in the petfood section". So if 'not for human consumption' is not stamped into lid.... it still could be petfood you are buying.

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hyaku

P.S. Got very sick eating at the Thai restaurant near Diplomat Hotel a few months ago.

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smokey

i got sick two times once in manila at wendys ordered the chicken about 4 in the afternoon was probably out from lunch not heated ... and once at Mc donalds with a egg breakfast 

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