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The Long War


SomeRandomGuy

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SomeRandomGuy

here is an idea and a bit of back ground to what it is all about.

 

http://mondoweiss.net/2013/09/the-long-war-syria-is-at-the-crux-of-pipeline-geopolitics.html

 

 

A number of folks have sent me this, so I pass it along. Nafeez Ahmed argues in the Guardian
that “Syrian intervention plans fuelled by oil interest, not chemical
weapons concerns”. And it is falling out according to grand plans,
including a Rand report on the “long war” to embroil jihadists in
internal strife so that we don’t lose Gulf oil. Ahmed is executive
director of the Institute for Policy Research & Development in the UK:


US-UK training of Syrian opposition forces [began in] 2011 aimed at eliciting “collapse” of Assad’s regime “from within.”

So what was this unfolding strategy to undermine Syria and Iran all about? According to
,

a memo from the Office of the US Secretary of Defense just a few weeks

after 9/11 revealed plans to “attack and destroy the governments in 7

countries in five years”, starting with Iraq and moving on to “Syria,

Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Iran.” In a subsequent interview,

Clark argues that this strategy is fundamentally about control of the
.

Much of the strategy currently at play was candidly described in a 2008
,
Unfolding the Future of the Long War
(pdf). The report noted that “the economies of the industrialized states will continue to rely heavily on
,

thus making it a strategically important resource.” As most oil will be

produced in the Middle East, the US has “motive for maintaining

stability in and good relations with Middle Eastern states”:

“The geographic area of proven oil reserves coincides with the power

base of much of the Salafi-jihadist network. This creates a linkage

between oil supplies and the long war that is not easily broken or

simply characterized… For the foreseeable future, world oil production

growth and total output will be dominated by Persian Gulf resources… The

region will therefore remain a strategic priority, and this priority

will interact strongly with that of prosecuting the long war.”

In this context, the report identified several potential trajectories

for regional policy focused on protecting access to Gulf oil supplies,

among which the following are most salient:

“Divide and Rule focuses on exploiting fault lines between the

various Salafi-jihadist groups to turn them against each other and

dissipate their energy on internal conflicts. This strategy relies

heavily on covert action, information operations (IO), unconventional

warfare, and support to indigenous security forces… the United States

and its local allies could use the nationalist jihadists to launch proxy

IO campaigns to discredit the transnational jihadists in the eyes of

the local populace… US leaders could also choose to capitalize on the

‘Sustained Shia-Sunni Conflict’ trajectory by taking the side of the

conservative Sunni regimes against Shiite empowerment movements in the

Muslim world…. possibly supporting authoritative Sunni governments

against a continuingly hostile Iran.”

Exploring different scenarios for this trajectory, the report

speculated that the US may concentrate “on shoring up the traditional

Sunni regimes in Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Pakistan as a way of

containing Iranian power and influence in the Middle East and Persian

Gulf.” Noting that this could actually empower al-Qaeda jihadists, the

report concluded that doing so might work in western interests by

bogging down jihadi activity with internal sectarian rivalry rather than

targeting the US:

“One of the oddities of this long war trajectory is that it may

actually reduce the al-Qaeda threat to US interests in the short term.

The upsurge in Shia identity and confidence seen here would certainly

cause serious concern in the Salafi-jihadist community in the Muslim

world, including the senior leadership of al-Qaeda. As a result, it is

very likely that al-Qaeda might focus its efforts on targeting Iranian

interests throughout the Middle East and Persian Gulf while

simultaneously cutting back on anti-American and anti-Western

operations.”

The RAND document contextualised this disturbing strategy with

surprisingly prescient recognition of the increasing vulnerability of

the US’s key allies and enemies – Saudi Arabia, the Gulf states, Egypt,

Syria, Iran – to a range of converging crises: rapidly rising

populations, a ‘youth bulge’, internal economic inequalities, political

frustrations, sectarian tensions, and environmentally-linked water

shortages, all of which could destabilise these countries from within or

exacerbate inter-state conflicts.

The report noted especially that Syria is among several “downstream

countries that are becoming increasingly water scarce as their

populations grow”, increasing a risk of conflict. Thus, although the

RAND document fell far short of recognising the prospect of an ‘Arab

Spring’, it illustrates that three years before the 2011 uprisings, US

defence officials were alive to the region’s growing instabilities, and

concerned by the potential consequences for stability of Gulf oil.

These strategic concerns, motivated by fear of expanding Iranian

influence, impacted Syria primarily in relation to pipeline geopolitics.

In 2009 – the same year former French foreign minister Dumas alleges

the British began planning operations in Syria – Assad
a proposed agreement with Qatar that would
,

contiguous with Iran’s South Pars field, through Saudi Arabia, Jordan,

Syria and on to Turkey, with a view to supply European markets – albeit

crucially bypassing Russia. Assad’s rationale was “to protect the

interests of [his] Russian ally, which is Europe’s top supplier of

natural gas.”

Instead, the following year, Assad pursued negotiations for
,

across Iraq to Syria, that would also potentially allow Iran to supply

gas to Europe from its South Pars field shared with Qatar. The

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for the project was signed in July

2012 – just as Syria’s civil war was spreading to Damascus and Aleppo –

and earlier this year Iraq signed a
.

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udonthani

this kind of tedious conspiracist oil-obsessed claptrap has been doing the rounds for years since even before the Iraq invasion. They start from the premise that every war or conflagration everywhere always must have something to do with oil and then extrapolate it from there. It's totally nonsensical.

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A_Simple_Man

 

It's totally nonsensical.

It makes more sense than:  We need to invade Iraq because there are weapons of mass destruction there.  And thus:  We need to invade Syria because there are chemical weapons there reminds me of the fable about the boy who cried 'Wolf'

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It makes more sense than:  We need to invade Iraq because there are weapons of mass destruction there.  And thus:  We need to invade Syria because there are chemical weapons there reminds me of the fable about the boy who cried 'Wolf'

 

Iraq did have weapons of mass destruction-- They were shipped to Syria right before the second US invasion---members of Saddam's own military later confirmed these actions

 

BTW---the US is producing more oil than Saudi Arabia at the moment

 

I just hope this does not turn into another situation like the Kurds------------shameful

Edited by KID
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SomeRandomGuy

this kind of tedious conspiracist oil-obsessed claptrap has been doing the rounds for years since even before the Iraq invasion. They start from the premise that every war or conflagration everywhere always must have something to do with oil and then extrapolate it from there. It's totally nonsensical.

 

The fact that syria was mentioned as the next country to be brought down in 2007 by General Wesley Clark kind of debunks your tedious conspiracist oil obsessed statement.

The "conspiracy theorist" always are put in the " crazy's" department.... why? Well the elite behind the lines, pulling the strings. They want you to think they are crazy.

The Jews did the same thing to jesus... look who is laughing now ( well at the moment they are) but after this life is over, I can assure you they won't be laughing that hard.

 

yes the jews were right...ha funny shit

Edited by SomeRandomGuy
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udonthani

mate the only reason why Syria is in the mess it is in is because of the Arab Spring, which nobody could forsee and was a totally spontaneous event predicted by nobody. These assinnine attempts to show some kind of hidden 'master plan' are sucked up, by infants only. And it is nothing at all new. I remember various morons claiming Syria a being the next 'target' almost 10 years ago when the US had not even been in Iraq that long. And they didn't mean like now, in 2013/14. They meant like back then, 2004/5.

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SomeRandomGuy

Yeah you are right..... :snap:  how could I have been so silly to think that our government's do not have an ulterior motive.

I must be wrong. Maybe Al Qaeda really did bomb those towers, it's not like anyone else was involved in dropping other towers?

 

It's ok.... I like that you sleep better at night knowing that everything you are told is real. And you don't need to question anything.




hey meant like back then, 2004/5.

 

maybe their timing was a bit out.

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udonthani

I hope you enjoy your fantasies but basically anybody who thinks the flow of historical events is 'controlled' by some hidden, mysterious 'elite' - who of course are usually walking around with these blue Stars of David embossed on their underpants - are if not living in the clouds, then dancing with the fairies.

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SomeRandomGuy

ahhh ok    and the jewish banks didn't cause the great depression. I guess.... I must be misinformed

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Britishandproud

Go on www.bestgore.com if you want to see some messed up shit. Type Syria in the search bar an look through the pages. You see the alquida killing the people by be headings and shooting etc. you can clearly see its not the military killing them because you can see that black flag. If this post is not allowed because of the site please can mod remove it an I won't post links again.

 

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SomeRandomGuy

dude that shit is fecked up.... how do u sleep at night looking at that shit?

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Britishandproud

I went on that sight when I seem someone else mention it on another Philippine forum an was shocked my self, and when looking on the sight came across stuff to do with Syria. And Philippines car accidents (a women split in half!)

 

But this Africans are brutal as feck! Beating people to death an even burning alive! Some were burnt alive because accused of being witches! After that shit I stopped going on it.

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udonthani

ahhh ok    and the jewish banks didn't cause the great depression. I guess.... I must be misinformed

yes that is one thing you got right. Banks are not 'Jewish', and never have been.

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SomeRandomGuy

OMG and u say I am living in fairy land....  who runs the reserve bank of the united states?

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Nangulo

who runs the reserve bank of the united states?

 

Ben S. Bernanke, Chairman
Janet L. Yellen, Vice Chair
Elizabeth A. Duke
Daniel K. Tarullo
Sarah Bloom Raskin
Jeremy C. Stein
Jerome H. Powell
 
 
Which ones / how many are Jewish?
 
And then, what difference does it make?
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