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Trickle current...


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miles-high

 

You might be married to a Filipina if she unplugs every electrical appliance in the house when not being used.

 

This subject needs a new topic…

 

There is a very good logic to it (you don’t usually find any logics to most of their behavior except this one)…


There are so many control/indicators which consume some minute current… e.g., a red indicator indicating the TV is off (do we really need to see that?), the room temp indicator while the air conditioner is even off, an LED light indicating the hair dryer is off but the cable is connected to the wall jack, a blinking LED showing that the printer is in its “sleep” mode, in fact the sleep mode itself is consuming trickle current, the freezer indicating inside temperature (which may useful ;)), the GFCI LED which shows it’s on stand-by mode and available, the charger LED which shows the charging cycle is completed… etc., etc. the list goes on...


By unplugging everything, you may save a bundle… I don’t have the numbers but I read it somewhere that one LED manufacturer claims if all these are eliminated in the US, you could eliminate one nuclear generating station… :)

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I don’t have the numbers but I read it somewhere that one LED manufacturer claims if all these are eliminated in the US, you could eliminate one nuclear generating station

 

So what you are saying is that if all 320 million Americans unplugged all electrical appliances, the US

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I don’t have the numbers but I read it somewhere that one LED manufacturer claims if all these are eliminated in the US, you could eliminate one nuclear generating station

So what you are saying is that if all 320 million Americans unplugged all electrical appliances, the US

Sorry about that....I can understand appliances with LEDs, but appliances without LEDs don't draw any power (not even a trickle) when they are not switched on.  So I don't see the benefit of unplugging all appliances, unless they have an LED. 

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miles-high

 

Sorry about that....I can understand appliances with LEDs, but appliances without LEDs don't draw any power (not even a trickle) when they are not switched on. So I don't see the benefit of unplugging all appliances, unless they have an LED.

 

No, any appliances with LED indicators... like a fridge with a temp indicator... TV with an OFF indicator light (when TV is ON, it's green but why do we need it? I can see the screen haha :) but my TV has a red LED when OFF, green when ON), a mircrowave with the current time, and so on... :)

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I have tried explaining to my wife that our toaster oven, which has no led lights period, does not use electricity when turned off.  I've tried explaining that fans of similar design use no electricity and so on and so forth, but she refuses to listen.

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miles-high

 

I have tried explaining to my wife that our toaster oven, which has no led lights period, does not use electricity when turned off. I've tried explaining that fans of similar design use no electricity and so on and so forth, but she refuses to listen.

 

:) If any "heating element" inside, e.g., hair dryer, heater, toaster oven, it would still be a good idea to unplug them... it's "up to you" hehe ;)

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There are a good reasons to unplug appliances,  they will not get damaged by lightning surges on the utility power and it prevents fires if a partial short circuit develops in the appliance. (that could be do to the lightning surges)

Edited by Woolf
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philuk

Every appliance that has a remote, will consume energy when it it turned off and not unplugged,

Have a look at any handbook it will tell you the appliances energy consumption when it is turned on and also when it is on standby

 

Even a desktop PC when turned off will consume a small amount through the power supply as it is waiting for a signal from the motherboard to tell it to switch on

 

We have one of thesebannerss03ms6-100.jpg

 

this has a tv remote receiver so that when you use the remote to turn off the TV it cuts the power to all the other things plugged into it such as a sky box video dvd and anything else you might have,    saves us quite a bit off the leccy bill

Edited by philuk
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Funny this post comes up because we started pulling plugs last month. Two big TVs (one used as comp monitor). Cable TV receiver. Microwave as with brownouts I get fed up of resetting the clock. Bill received yesterday is considerably down.

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Knowdafish

My favorite is when my wife turns up the thermostat on the refer to save electricity, but complains when things in it go bad to quickly; are not cold enough; or stuff in the freezer is "mushy". 

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This subject needs a new topic…

 

There is a very good logic to it (you don’t usually find any logics to most of their behavior except this one)…

 

There are so many control/indicators which consume some minute current… e.g., a red indicator indicating the TV is off (do we really need to see that?), the room temp indicator while the air conditioner is even off, an LED light indicating the hair dryer is off but the cable is connected to the wall jack, a blinking LED showing that the printer is in its “sleep” mode, in fact the sleep mode itself is consuming trickle current, the freezer indicating inside temperature (which may useful ;)), the GFCI LED which shows it’s on stand-by mode and available, the charger LED which shows the charging cycle is completed… etc., etc. the list goes on...

 

By unplugging everything, you may save a bundle… I don’t have the numbers but I read it somewhere that one LED manufacturer claims if all these are eliminated in the US, you could eliminate one nuclear generating station… :)

 

I once saw a TV documentary that suggested you could save up to 10% of your consumption by switching off (unplugging) electrical items that were otherwise on stand-by.  This assessment applied to American/European homes that contained much electronic equipment.

 

What has not been stressed in the above posts is that anything with a transformer - e.g. 220v to 110, 'phone chargers, shaver chargers, battery chargers - will consume considerable power over time if left plugged in.

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Yeah, wallwarts usually consume some power even when nothing is being powered on the other end. They will feel warm.

 

I think some of the newer ones are much better in that regard.

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