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How do the locals live?


tomaw

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USMC-Retired

Tomaw why stay. I was held hostage by the political burecratic red tape to correct two letters on a marriage license. That took even after I had all the verfying ID documents (11 of them) 9 months to correct. 9 months of wanting to leave so until you held here because of simple Filipino Bullshit then you have zero clue. Think it cannot happen to you think again. I am leaving in 15 days thank God I put it out a bit farther with tropical storms.

 

 

Just so you know those 11 ID documents included Driver license for someone who does not drive, Confirmation in Catholic Church for non-catholic, Comlec ID issued only in Manila. So and so. How long does that take?? How much does it cost?? Guess what people you have three choices go to pay a bribe, at the discretion of LCR and comply or go to court. The same LCR that only wanted one document to marry us wanted 11 to fix her mistake. Atttitude? People miss the big picture of what can happen to you. Wonder why so many leave this place I can promise its this type of BS.

So keep your rose colored view #people not everyone has had the same experinces. Those that go through the Bullshit of dealing with a system that s corrupt at its vary nature do not care. It can take years to fix, correct or get out. Glad you enjoy your time and hope nothing happens where you are victimized by the system here.

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OFWs are the people whose families live comfortably on the most part. My brother in law brings in 7000 usd per month as a chief officer on LNG tanker ships, they own several properties for rental, a p

Firstly, I have not read any other replies here. So, I hope I am not repeating information that was previously posted.   Secondly, you would NEVER hear or read where I have said you could not live a

Don't take this the wrong way, but what are you after with this question? I truly do not understand what you are looking for?   I tried to read the responses, here, but the replies just reek with pe

As most posters would say already it totally depends on what your level of standard is or what you are willing to give up.

Most people who life on a meager salary do dream of having an OFW lifestyle (for example) and being able to life to good life.
1500 USD (or 67.500PHP for locals) isn't a bad monthly income. If you're single with a live-in wife/girlfriend this would be a good income to rely on

stating the fact, that you don't have any crazy medical conditions/fixed monthly medical costs. And you don't wish to live in some kind of mansion.

 

How much budget you need on a month to month basis truly depends on your preferences and spending patterns. Are you a good pennypincher or do you love to swat the dough out once payday comes up? If you are willing to slow down and keep yourself a simple life with-out too much wastefull luxurious you can seriously budget here.
 

Kids are expensive,

visa extensions and visa-runs are expensive,
big houses are expensive,

Cars are expensive,

and luxury imported foods (as salad, wine, brocolli etc) are expensive.

 

It all depends, where you choice to stay (city wise or provincial), what your hobbies/daytime spending will cost you, legal addictions (medicine, booze, cigs), and how good you can adjust and live in the lifestyle.
Most locals who live on low-end incomes don't own a private form of transport, usually don't buy anything more then basic foods that are available in the local (dirty) markets, wash by hand, live in small apartments in not the best neighboorhoods (you can fall in love with it anyhow), share a lot, sometimes have lending to pay for certain luxuries. most likely don't eat out, don't do a SM-shopping sprawl every week, don't ride taxi's, don't cook on a gas cooker, don't own time saving appliances like rice-cookers/water-cookers (or don't have the cash to replace them immediately, don't really travel even small inter-island trips. But most of all don't have the special needs and wants of an foreignor who get's homesick and is willing to pay 5 dollars for that special lays bag he so desperately is yearning for.

In my opinion, a good adjuster and penny pincher can live quite good on 1500USD, as long as you keep your balance in check. Don't overspend and over the long run after establishing a base (starting up everything for your house etc will be quite expensive) and accumulating some savings you can start making small time investments and generate a little income on top of your standard salary and expand from that.
It's seriously do-able, you might not be in the crowd with the big boys but you can succesfully live a good and happy fulfilling life if you wish to do so.




My biggest piece of advice for older people (50+) is seriously take your medicine needs in your budget, cause that's the cause most people I know end up leaving or getting in trouble over not being able to pay their (expensive) medicine. And getting someone to borrow you a swat full of cash that seems like 'nothing' to you is definitely harder here then you back home

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Davaoeno

 

My sister-in-law is a teacher at a public school. Her husband operates a typical sari sari. Their combined income is around 50,000 a month.

 

I have to question that number . My gf  has a Masters degree  has been a public school teacher at the largest public school in Davao  for 18 years and earns 23000 a month.  If your sil earns the same that means the sari sari store makes 27000 a month - which is something i find hard to believe

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Davaoeno

 

He worked for 270 an hour.

 

 

I assume you meant 270 a day ?

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So how are the successful locals able to have a good standard of living on what they make?

 

The title of this post and the quote above suggests to me that a reader of this thread will want to know how successful locals have a good standard of living.

 

Of course, since the members of the forum are largely expats, there will be a tendency to make the inevitable comparisons to their own expectations.  That is, as a value is given as to income or monthly outgo, it will be tempting to describe what sort of sacrifices a foreigner has to make to fell comfortable here.

 

For my part, I am glad to share with members what I know of the living standards of my neighbors and family.  In all, we have eight families, all living locally, who are siblings of my wife.  Of these, only one family would be considered to be successful and I described them above.  All others, including the parents would fall into the poor and unsuccessful category.

 

I can understand the mystique about how it is that locals can have so much less than many of our members and yet seem to have a good life.  For myself, I have spent most of my adult life away from my home country that I don't always see the differences.  The last time I was home, cellphones were not even popular there.  There was no such thing as "free wifi". Hard to see how I was giving up those benefits of a modern society.

 

To be clear, I described a family who would be considered successful and has an income as I described.  I can understand some might find that difficult to believe.  I have no reason to exaggerate. My intention is to answer the OP and perhaps inform some casual reader about life here.

 

This is the sort of thread that I think this forum is good at.  A lot better than bullshit like "did you eat her".

 

It would be difficult to use simple comparisons between a diverse expat community and locals who are considered successful.  For example, I live in the provinces, so there are a lot of differences from those who live in urban areas.

 

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Davaoeno

 

The title of this post and the quote above suggests to me that a reader of this thread will want to know how successful locals have a good standard of living.

 

 

Which is of course impossible without discussing what the words " successful" and " good standard" mean !!!!!   [  I can understand some might find that difficult to believe.  I have no reason to exaggerate. ]

 

 

Trying to oversimplify any complex situation does not aid anyone .  

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We waited 18 months for an amendment. Problem is they are still transferring from hand written to computer records.

 

Not sticking up for people that spend the entire day watching an office TV. Provincial office work is "laid back" to say the least.

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A_Simple_Man

 

Trying to oversimplify any complex situation does not aid anyone

 I will agree with that if you will agree that trying to over-complicate a simple situation does not aid anyone.  :wheel:
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Davaoeno

 I will agree with that if you will agree that trying to over-complicate a simple situation does not aid anyone.  :wheel:

:good:

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Filipinos can live cheaper than foreigners, within the boundaries of the Philippines. When they go to the west, though, things change considerably. I witnessed that during the time I lived in the US, and knew many Filipinos. Trust me, they can learn to waste as much as we do, in the west.

 

It is actually kinda funny to watch

 

All of a sudden they are the ones looking for foods from their home country and saying---I not eat that !!!!!

 

All of a sudden they are the ones who need the temp. set high in the winter at the slightest hint coldness

 

A from what I have seen---they don't do well if they don't get them-------------------TAMPO

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Headshot

Tomaw, I can't address what all "professionals" here make, but I do know what teachers and cops (PNP) make. Four years ago, a typical teacher made 14,000 pesos a month and a typical PNP officer made about 16,000 pesos a month. Since then, the pay for both fields has gone up dramatically. A typical teacher now makes almost 24,000 pesos a month and a typical PNP officer makes about 27,000 pesos a month. Obviously, there are teachers and officers that make more than what is typical. PNP officers can get promoted up through the ranks, in which case they will make more. With teachers, there is no pay scale like those you will find in Western countries based on educational level and years of teaching. Here, there are two grades of teachers...a regular teacher and a "master" teacher. A regular teacher could be a fresh graduate with no experience or a teacher with years of experience and advanced degrees. They are both paid the same. Being a master teacher has nothing to do with education or experience level. I has to do with sucking up to administrators. Master teachers are paid about 27,000 pesos a month.

 

If you do the math, a couple, who are both professionals, can make a lot more than the $300 a month level you referred to (which is based on old information). My wife still has a lot of friends who are teaching. One friend, in particular, started teaching the same year as my wife, and married a PNP officer about three years ago. Being that the pay levels were lower then, they were able to buy (with a PAG-IBIG loan) a townhouse in a DECA subdivision. They could buy the townhouse, but they had no money left over to fix it up at all. In the beginning, they weren't able to afford tile for the floors, so they put in vinyl flooring...which is similar to the vinyl westerners use to line the shelves in their cupboards. They had very little furniture, so their house was really Spartan.

 

In the beginning, they couldn't afford to own their own transportation, but a year later, they were able to buy a motorcycle. That meant that the husband rode the bike to work, but they were usually working different shifts, so the wife usually still rode jeepneys to and from school. Now, they have finally been able to finish in the upstairs (which come with no interior walls and concrete floors), but they still have the crappy vinyl flooring throughout and slightly upgraded furniture. Between them, they are making the equivalent of about $1,200 US a month, so that can give you a point of reference. They have a baby now, but luckily they were able to enlist the wife's younger sister as a yaya (for free), so having the baby doesn't add nearly as much in expenses as if they had to pay for a yaya. They had to have a yaya for the wife to continue working.

 

Their lifestyle, while higher than most Filipinos, is still not what I would consider comfortable. I guess it depends on your standards of what constitutes "comfort" for each of us. That is an individual thing. Now, to be fair, if they were living far out in the provinces, and had relatives who would sell them land cheap, then they would probably have a nicer home, but our friends live where their jobs are. And...they didn't have any relatives who actually owned land they could live on, so they had to pull themselves up by the bootstraps. I don't know if this gives you an idea of how "typical professionals" live here in the Philippines, but I hope it helps. In reality, Many "professionals" don't have it so good, since only one partner in the marriage has a decent job. I don't know why it is that so many teachers marry bums, but they do, and their lives are usually Hell.

 

Doctors, lawyers, architects and engineers fall into a totally different class of professionals. They tend to make money according to how good they are at what they do, and also depending on how well-connected they are. There is really no comparison between them and the salaried professionals, such as teachers, police and nurses.

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Don't take this the wrong way, but what are you after with this question? I truly do not understand what you are looking for?

 

I tried to read the responses, here, but the replies just reek with people who apparently think they know what life is about and look down their noses at life here ... As God as my witness, why are you here if you have nothing good to say about this place? Are you tied and chained up here and can't leave? What? Just bad character? Its like a recurring theme here.

 

Here's a clue for some : Donald trump looks down his nose at your life right now.

Clue #2 -- Lots of people around the world buy food for 1 day .. The food tastes better when not frozen for a week ... When I was in GER a ~decade or so back, many in that society purchased food for 1 day. Is that so bad? lol ...

 

My monthly payments are 4,000P for rent, 1000P for internet, 1000 ELEC, 200P for water ... Again, I do not live in the same Philippines as 99% of the posters here ...

 

Nothing is going here but life ...Same as across the globe ...

....... I'm not one of the ones you're talking about, I live in California.
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Tomaw why stay. I was held hostage by the political burecratic red tape to correct two letters on a marriage license. That took even after I had all the verfying ID documents (11 of them) 9 months to correct. 9 months of wanting to leave so until you held here because of simple Filipino Bullshit then you have zero clue. Think it cannot happen to you think again. I am leaving in 15 days thank God I put it out a bit farther with tropical storms.

 

 

Just so you know those 11 ID documents included Driver license for someone who does not drive, Confirmation in Catholic Church for non-catholic, Comlec ID issued only in Manila. So and so. How long does that take?? How much does it cost?? Guess what people you have three choices go to pay a bribe, at the discretion of LCR and comply or go to court. The same LCR that only wanted one document to marry us wanted 11 to fix her mistake. Atttitude? People miss the big picture of what can happen to you. Wonder why so many leave this place I can promise its this type of BS.

So keep your rose colored view #people not everyone has had the same experinces. Those that go through the Bullshit of dealing with a system that s corrupt at its vary nature do not care. It can take years to fix, correct or get out. Glad you enjoy your time and hope nothing happens where you are victimized by the system here.

...... I'm sorry you had so much hassle but I'm glad you're finally able to get out. But no, I don't think we're likely to go through the same problems. My wife lives with me now in California and has a green card. When we go back to the Philippines she will probably also be an American citizen with an American passport. We are getting a little off topic here though. The question is on how the locals live. Edited by tomaw
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USMC-Retired

There is almost no point in trying to understand how they live. I am in the place an expat would never go. They live on less the 2000 pesos a month here. Funny there are no wild dogs around. There life and how they live is not understanable to a westerner. I look around every day and am amazed at this place. There is a rather large population here 4-7,000 I would assume. We had no power for the last two days and today no water. The power has been off more then on and water there is the local hand pump. This is the life for a large portion of the Philippines. Eat what you raise and grow. Fresh pig today and yesterday Bysan chicken. Lots of veggies and bannanas.

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Britishandproud

Tomaw, I can't address what all "professionals" here make, but I do know what teachers and cops (PNP) make. Four years ago, a typical teacher made 14,000 pesos a month and a typical PNP officer made about 16,000 pesos a month. Since then, the pay for both fields has gone up dramatically. A typical teacher now makes almost 24,000 pesos a month and a typical PNP officer makes about 27,000 pesos a month. Obviously, there are teachers and officers that make more than what is typical. PNP officers can get promoted up through the ranks, in which case they will make more. With teachers, there is no pay scale like those you will find in Western countries based on educational level and years of teaching. Here, there are two grades of teachers...a regular teacher and a "master" teacher. A regular teacher could be a fresh graduate with no experience or a teacher with years of experience and advanced degrees. They are both paid the same. Being a master teacher has nothing to do with education or experience level. I has to do with sucking up to administrators. Master teachers are paid about 27,000 pesos a month.

 

If you do the math, a couple, who are both professionals, can make a lot more than the $300 a month level you referred to (which is based on old information). My wife still has a lot of friends who are teaching. One friend, in particular, started teaching the same year as my wife, and married a PNP officer about three years ago. Being that the pay levels were lower then, they were able to buy (with a PAG-IBIG loan) a townhouse in a DECA subdivision. They could buy the townhouse, but they had no money left over to fix it up at all. In the beginning, they weren't able to afford tile for the floors, so they put in vinyl flooring...which is similar to the vinyl westerners use to line the shelves in their cupboards. They had very little furniture, so their house was really Spartan.

 

In the beginning, they couldn't afford to own their own transportation, but a year later, they were able to buy a motorcycle. That meant that the husband rode the bike to work, but they were usually working different shifts, so the wife usually still rode jeepneys to and from school. Now, they have finally been able to finish in the upstairs (which come with no interior walls and concrete floors), but they still have the crappy vinyl flooring throughout and slightly upgraded furniture. Between them, they are making the equivalent of about $1,200 US a month, so that can give you a point of reference. They have a baby now, but luckily they were able to enlist the wife's younger sister as a yaya (for free), so having the baby doesn't add nearly as much in expenses as if they had to pay for a yaya. They had to have a yaya for the wife to continue working.

 

Their lifestyle, while higher than most Filipinos, is still not what I would consider comfortable. I guess it depends on your standards of what constitutes "comfort" for each of us. That is an individual thing. Now, to be fair, if they were living far out in the provinces, and had relatives who would sell them land cheap, then they would probably have a nicer home, but our friends live where their jobs are. And...they didn't have any relatives who actually owned land they could live on, so they had to pull themselves up by the bootstraps. I don't know if this gives you an idea of how "typical professionals" live here in the Philippines, but I hope it helps. In reality, Many "professionals" don't have it so good, since only one partner in the marriage has a decent job. I don't know why it is that so many teachers marry bums, but they do, and their lives are usually Hell.

 

Doctors, lawyers, architects and engineers fall into a totally different class of professionals. They tend to make money according to how good they are at what they do, and also depending on how well-connected they are. There is really no comparison between them and the salaried professionals, such as teachers, police and nurses.

 

I know a girl and her dad is a policeman and his mum was a major in the police, The girl told me her gran gets 50k a month, Don't know if that's true or sounds right. I do know they have money though by the way they spend etc. This is in Davao city.
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