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How do the locals live?


tomaw

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Let me be a little more specific. I'm not talking about the poor and uneducated living in some squatter's shack. I'm also not talking about the rich elite. I am talking about local Philippine professionals ( teachers, nurses, engineers etc.) that average about $300 a month. I've read several threads that tell me this. I've also read a bunch of cost of living threads with posts by expats that think I'll be living in poverty on less than $1,500 a month. So how are the successful locals able to have a good standard of living on what they make?

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OFWs are the people whose families live comfortably on the most part. My brother in law brings in 7000 usd per month as a chief officer on LNG tanker ships, they own several properties for rental, a p

Firstly, I have not read any other replies here. So, I hope I am not repeating information that was previously posted.   Secondly, you would NEVER hear or read where I have said you could not live a

Don't take this the wrong way, but what are you after with this question? I truly do not understand what you are looking for?   I tried to read the responses, here, but the replies just reek with pe

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Salty Dog

A good standard of living for many people means they have shelter and food. They make due with what they have. Also I can't tell you the number of people I've met that live in someone else's house rent free. They often buy food day by day, never stocking up on anything.

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rice with every meal, overcrowded living quarters and other things you aren't accustomed to but they are.

Edited by Edwin
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tobster

I know quite a few here locally they either lend money, raise pigs or have additional income via business interests.

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Alan S

Look for a video named, "toughest place to be a bus driver". Download and watch and you will see how many /most Filipinas live.

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Locals as you put it are poor.

27.9% of the population make 16.800 pesos a year.

 

No disrespect intended but many foreigners want to live in the style they have been accustomed to for many years. Nice living conditions, even expect to eat and drink the same products. In a foreign country that can work out expensive.

Edited by hyaku
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batman2525

 

you will see how many /most Filipinas live.

 

Yea...but that guy owns a jeepney...Ive seen worst places in Cebu than where that guy lived.

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USMC-Retired

Life here is not cheaper, just affords you an opportunity to live cheaper. Services and rentals are cheaper, Utilities and Commodities are more. Come here expecting the same creature comforts from Cali plan to pay similar prices. You must adapt to local brands local foods. Example Oshi potato chips are 30% cheaper then Lays. Not as good but they are good enough.

 

How do they do it ? After 6+ years here I have not a single clue. As to me I would be 100% miserable.

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I think $300 a month is a little low - Smokey shared a few weeks ago on a different thread, that one of his daughters is a nurse and another a teacher - both had incomes around 20,000 pesos a month  -nearly $500 a month.

By western standards, pretty low - but we aren't in the West.  Most younger people have roommates splitting the cost of rent, utilities and food - a 50 lb bag of rice for two people will last nearly two months (there are 10 in our family and we buy 2 bags a month).

 

Most people do not have their own transportation, younger people may have motor bike. They bath at public baths and wash their own cloths by hand. It is a whole different world here and I like it

Edited by mpt1947
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udonthani

rice with every meal, overcrowded living quarters and other things you aren't accustomed to but they are.

that is on the money. It is not so bad though.

 

provided you you get un-accustomed first. Then it is not so bad, at all.

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OFWs are the people whose families live comfortably on the most part. My brother in law brings in 7000 usd per month as a chief officer on LNG tanker ships, they own several properties for rental, a pig farm and a large beautiful modern house in Talisay which I'm incredibly jealous of. They also know how to look after their money without being particularly generous to the less fortunate family members, so we just follow their lead.

OFWs bring in anything from 400usd to 10,000+ usd a month from all over the world which i'm sure pays for many of these large houses on new subdivisions. I can't see the average doctor or lawyer in the Philippines affording the same houses, unless they have several professional salaries coming in.

 

That being said, with the climate in the Philippines, its very easy to live comfortably without many of the luxuries. Build a single story house with a few bedrooms, kitchen and lounge, get around to the windows when you can afford them, it's no real hassle. I'd rather live in a basic house mortgage free, then a massive house and up to my ears in debt.

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udonthani

OFWs are the people whose families live comfortably on the most part. My brother in law brings in 7000 usd per month as a chief officer on LNG tanker ships, they own several properties for rental, a pig farm and a large beautiful modern house in Talisay which I'm incredibly jealous of. They also know how to look after their money without being particularly generous to the less fortunate family members, so we just follow their lead.

OFWs bring in anything from 400usd to 10,000+ usd a month from all over the world which i'm sure pays for many of these large houses on new subdivisions. I can't see the average doctor or lawyer in the Philippines affording the same houses, unless they have several professional salaries coming in.

 

That being said, with the climate in the Philippines, its very easy to live comfortably without many of the luxuries. Build a single story house with a few bedrooms, kitchen and lounge, get around to the windows when you can afford them, it's no real hassle. I'd rather live in a basic house mortgage free, then a massive house and up to my ears in debt.

I agree with most of this. You are just another OFW.

 

not some, exotic animal in a zoo.

 

you are one of the boys. Just blend in.

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Alan S

Yea...but that guy owns a jeepney...Ive seen worst places in Cebu than where that guy lived.

 

So have I (seen worse), but looking at his lifestyle, which is that of a hard working self employed driver, plus that of others around him, gives an idea how the (slightly) better off live.

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Brucewayne

Let me be a little more specific. I'm not talking about the poor and uneducated living in some squatter's shack. I'm also not talking about the rich elite. I am talking about local Philippine professionals ( teachers, nurses, engineers etc.) that average about $300 a month. I've read several threads that tell me this. I've also read a bunch of cost of living threads with posts by expats that think I'll be living in poverty on less than $1,500 a month. So how are the successful locals able to have a good standard of living on what they make?

 

I personally know a man and wife (American & Filipina) who live on $900 a month and do pretty well.

No children though and as I found out, a child is not cheap to raise here as some would have you believe.

I am married to a Filipina, am American and we have a child.

We live on $1,500 per month and do pretty well, even though things get tight at times such as unexpected medical bills and the start of a school year, but we have never had to do without the essentials.

I am sure that I could be happy with $700 per month here if I were single, but I am not as high maintenance as my family is.

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udonthani

I am sure that I could be happy with $700 per month here if I were single, but I am not as high maintenance as my family is.

that, obviously, is where the extra $1000 goes per month.

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