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Are American expats going to buy US health insurance or pay the fine?


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i would be under the impression that the government wants your money and could not care less about if you can use it or not ..  but that's just my assumption going on how they normally do things

I have never hated a sitting President more than the piece of shit that is in office now.    Jesus, this whole thread makes me want to puke. Apologies to the OP, but, that is how I feel because of O

I am under the impression expats are exempt from this law. How are we supposed to use USA health insurance here?

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broden

maybe you can get treatment for your bulimia too

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throttleplate

The telehealth market, which is slated to impact 1.8 million patients worldwide by 2017, compared to 308,000 today, offers a glimpse into what the most profitable hospitals of the future might look like–empty.

It would be awesome if they could operate on my shoulder through the internet.If someone is in need of an operation and doesn't have health insurance look into the Baumgarden? hospital in Thailand,Phuket is where I think it is and they list online price estimates for all kinds of operations,this may save you lots of money from travel costs to the usa and out of pocket doctor bills,i have already looked into brain transplant but that is not yet available to humans,at least not this year.
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rfm010

this thread has caused me to look into the question a bit.  the results of an initial google search:

 

http://www.artiopartners.com/blog/obamacare-taxes-americans-living-abroad/

 

 

  ...effective January 1, 2014 Americans will be required to obtain affordable healthcare coverage or to pay a penalty tax. The annual penalty tax will start at $95 and grow to $695 by YR 2016. Effective January 1, 2013 some high-income earners
including American expats will be subject to 3.8% Medicare tax on net investment income. Americans living abroad must be aware of the major provisions of Obamacare that affect them.

...

Let’s review the key Obamacare provisions that American expats must be aware of.


  • Healthcare coverage. The PPACA is currently available only to residents of the United States and it covers only
    domestic insurance plans. Per Obamacare insurers cannot discriminate against individuals with pre-existing conditions or chronic health conditions. Consequently, Americans living abroad with pre-existing health conditions cannot take advantage of this opportunity and they cannot buy a domestic insurance plan. American expats are advised to review their medical coverage options overseas.
  •  
  • Penalty tax. Americans living abroad are exempt from a penalty tax under Obamacare. However, there is one caveat.
    American expats are considered to have enough health coverage if they qualify for the foreign income exclusion. It means that even if Americans living abroad do not have health coverage, they are not required to pay a penalty tax under Obamacare. The key thing is that they meet a physical presence test or bona fide residence test to qualify for the foreign income exclusion.
  •  
  • 3.8% Medicare tax on net investment income.
    Although, most Americans living abroad are exempt from a penalty tax under Obamacare, some high-income earners living abroad will have to pay 3.8% Medicare tax on net investment income. Net investment income includes capital gains, rents, royalties, interest, dividends and annuities. The following categories of American expatriates are affected per Obamacare:
Single filer with AGI (adjusted gross income) over $200,000
  1. Married filing jointly with AGI over $250,000
  2. Married filing separately with AGI over $125,000

These high-income earners will be subject to an additional Medicare 0.9% tax on wages and self-employment income under Obamacare. However, the USA has social security agreements with 24 countries that prevent dual social security coverage. Some American expats might be exempt from the additional 0.9% Medicare tax under Obamacare.

 

 

NOTE:  i am seeing on other sites information that seems to contradict the above.  so i don't yet know what is right.  sigh.

 

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lifeisgood

its a tax,it was noted by the supreme court that it is a tax,therefore we pay taxes and we will pay for this obamacare if used or not.Living outside the usa has no bearing on not paying as the system will fail without everyone chipping in and it looks to be failing now as younger people are opting to stay out of the deal for now.

 

If you buy into it and live in the ph and want to use it you may need to go to guam or Hawaii but then where do you stay and costs of airline tickets,hotels,return visits....such a pain in the ass.

 

Depends on how long you stay out of the US .  If long enough, you will be excluded (330 days in calender year).

 

 

12. Are US citizens living abroad subject to the individual shared responsibility provision?

Yes. However, US citizens who live abroad for a calendar year (or at least 330 days within a 12 month period) are treated as having minimum essential coverage for the year (or period). These are individuals who qualify for an exclusion from income under section 911 of the Code. See Publication 54 for further information on the section 911 exclusion. They need take no further action to comply with the individual shared responsibility provision.

 

http://www.irs.gov/uac/Questions-and-Answers-on-the-Individual-Shared-Responsibility-Provision

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hchoate

 

US citizens who live abroad for a calendar year (or at least 330 days within a 12 month period) are treated as having minimum essential coverage for the year

 

Sounds like you will be good if you don't come back for 35.242 days. Of course, they keep changing the rules so stay tuned. And how about if you maintain a residence in the US? I guess then you aren't really an expat.

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throttleplate

I would be interested in seeing the paperwork for the physical presence and resident test.If you use a mail forwarder with usa address and usa phone number from magic jack how will that work?

 

Wait till the day when us americans will not be allowed out of the country until we pay a exit fee,punishment for us not spending our money in the usa.

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lifeisgood

I would be interested in seeing the paperwork for the physical presence and resident test.If you use a mail forwarder with usa address and usa phone number from magic jack how will that work?

 

Wait till the day when us americans will not be allowed out of the country until we pay a exit fee,punishment for us not spending our money in the usa.

 

The requirements is the foreign earned income exclusion requirements.  If you're eligible for that, you are excluded from obamacare.  Stay out of country for 330 days and you meet the requirements.

 

http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/International-Taxpayers/Foreign-Earned-Income-Exclusion-Can-I-Claim-the-Exclusion-or-Deduction

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SkyMan

 

I would be interested in seeing the paperwork for the physical presence and resident test.If you use a mail forwarder with usa address and usa phone number from magic jack how will that work?

Sounds like they are using the same tests as for the foreign income exclusion from the IRS.  To qualify you need to meet the tax home test and either the Bona Fide Residence Test or the Physical Presence Test.  I think the Bona Fide Residence test would be satisfied simply by having a 13A.

 

Tax home test.

 

To meet this test, your tax home must be in a foreign country, or countries (see Foreign country, earlier), throughout your period of bona fide residence or physical presence, whichever applies. For this purpose, your period of physical presence is the 330 full days during which you were present in a foreign country, not the 12 consecutive months during which those days occurred.

 

Your tax home is your regular or principal place of business, employment, or post of duty, regardless of where you maintain your family residence. If you do not have a regular or principal place of business because of the nature of your trade or business, your tax home is your regular place of abode (the place where you regularly live).

 

You are not considered to have a tax home in a foreign country for any period during which your abode is in the United States. However, if you are temporarily present in the United States, or you maintain a dwelling in the United States (whether or not that dwelling is used by your spouse and dependents), it does not necessarily mean that your abode is in the United States during that time.


Example. You are employed on an offshore oil rig in the territorial waters of a foreign country and work a 28-day on/ 28-day off schedule. You return to your family residence in the United States during your off periods. You are considered to have an abode in the United States and do not meet the tax home test. You cannot claim either of the exclusions or the housing deduction.

 

Bona Fide Residence Test


 

To meet this test, you must be one of the following:

 

A U.S. citizen who is a bona fide resident of a foreign country, or countries, for an uninterrupted period that includes an entire tax year (January 1–December 31, if you file a calendar year return), or

 

A U.S. resident alien who is a citizen or national of a country with which the United States has an income tax treaty in effect and who is a bona fide resident of a foreign country, or countries, for an uninterrupted period that includes an entire tax year (January 1–December 31, if you file a calendar year return). See Pub. 901, U.S. Tax Treaties, for a list of countries with which the United States has an income tax treaty in effect.

 

Whether you are a bona fide resident of a foreign country depends on your intention about the length and nature of your stay. Evidence of your intention may be your words and acts. If these conflict, your acts carry more weight than your words. Generally, if you go to a foreign country for a definite, temporary purpose and return to the United States after you accomplish it, you are not a bona fide resident of the foreign country. If accomplishing the purpose requires an extended, indefinite stay, and you make your home in the foreign country, you may be a bona fide resident. See Pub. 54 for more information and examples.

 

Line 10. Enter the dates your bona fide residence began and ended. If you are still a bona fide resident, enter "Continues" in the space for the date your bona fide residence ended.

 

Lines 13a and 13b. If you submitted a statement of nonresidence to the authorities of a foreign country in which you earned income and the authorities hold that you are not subject to their income tax laws by reason of nonresidency in the foreign country, you are not considered a bona fide resident of that country.

 

If you submitted such a statement and the authorities have not made an adverse determination of your nonresident status, you are not considered a bona fide resident of that country.

 

 

 

Physical Presence Test


 

To meet this test, you must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien who is physically present in a foreign country, or countries, for at least 330 full days during any period of 12 months in a row. A full day means the 24-hour period that starts at midnight.

 

To figure 330 full days, add all separate periods you were present in a foreign country during the 12-month period shown on line 16. The 330 full days can be interrupted by periods when you are traveling over international waters or are otherwise not in a foreign country. See Pub. 54 for more information and examples.

 

Note. A nonresident alien who, with a U.S. citizen or U.S. resident alien spouse, chooses to be taxed as a resident of the United States can qualify under this test if the time requirements are met. See Pub. 54 for details on how to make this choice.

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throttleplate

whats stopping a person from lieing about where he is and has been?No wonder Obama has hired 15000 new irs agents to figure this all out during tax time.3 more years of this nozzle head.

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lifeisgood

whats stopping a person from lieing about where he is and has been?No wonder Obama has hired 15000 new irs agents to figure this all out during tax time.3 more years of this nozzle head.

 

You don't think they keep track of your coming and goings out of the country?

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easy44

whats stopping a person from lieing about where he is and has been?No wonder Obama has hired 15000 new irs agents to figure this all out during tax time.3 more years of this nozzle head.

If they suspect you, all they have to do is check your passport.

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SkyMan

Well, if you pass the bona fide test above, the number of days in the US doesn't matter (within reason) as long as you're not working there or going to school.

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hchoate

 

You don't think they keep track of your coming and goings out of the country

 

'They' keep track of comings but not goings- that's the reason they are free to remain ignorant of all those millions of illegal aliens who have overstayed their visas.

 

But you know that if anyone gets 'cracked down on' in that any regard it will be law-abiding tax-paying citizens before the scoflaws who, coincidentally, can be counted on to vote Democrat.

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