Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Alfred E. Neuman

plumbing

Recommended Posts

Alfred E. Neuman

our house is as old as my brain which means the small pipes are dirty, we have an elevated water tank. Is it possible to pour drano to improve water pressure?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowdafish

Are you talking about the freshwater feed lines or the drain lines? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alfred E. Neuman

feed lines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowdafish

I wouldn't use draino in a freshwater line. Are your lines plastic of metal? If they are plastic they are likely lined with hard water deposits, and any low points may have a build-up of sediments and scale. Do you have or use any kind of a filter? 

 

If any of your lines are steel, even galvanized steel, the inside of your pipes are likely clogged with chunks of rust. 

 

You faucets will also get clogged with debris along with toilet valves. 

 

You might be able to blow some of the crap out by using compressed air, which is what I would try 1st with a limit of 40 psi or so. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Davaoeno

Thirsty ? want a glass or water ?  do you want ice with that ?  how about some draino ?    :ROFLMAO:    Not only will it quench your thirst but it will probably keep you regular also !! 

 

Why not email the company that makes Drano and ask if they recommend that you put it into your fresh water supply ????  Your email will probably make their annual newsletter  ! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RogerDat

Greetings! I will assume you are serious. If you got metal lines, or small blue plastic (1/2 inch size), both have problems.

metal rust, and plastic grows mold inside. Cheapest way is to run new 3/4 inch plastic lines, and use air conditioning insulation on any that have direct sunlight on them.

Clean inside the tank before you connect the new lines, and give it a good washing out, then connect the new lines.

I suggest you hire someone to do this as this does not appear your strong point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
philuk

I will be sending over copper pipe from here with all the other stuff in the container when i start my build

 

dont like the idea of steel or plastic. copper is good at killing bacteria.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
roadhaze

YOU can not be serious. DRANO in your water. DRANO IS A TOILET CLEANER. I personaly don't want to be any where nere your water supply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowdafish

I will be sending over copper pipe from here with all the other stuff in the container when i start my build

 

dont like the idea of steel or plastic. copper is good at killing bacteria.

 

What wall thickness? Just be aware that the often hard and alkaline water here eats copper. Be sure and bring a lot of pipe wrap too if you plan on running your copper pipe through concrete. 

Edited by Knowdafish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alfred E. Neuman

it really does sound stupid but i was planning to only use the water until at least 5 watertank refills. we never use faucet water for drinking or cooking . Fixing/replacing the steel and plastic pipes will require building a new house.  Will try the compressed air method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hyaku

One of my outside faucets stopped running. Took it off. There was an eel jammed in it. Needed pliers to get it out. Now thats what I call 'fresh water'. Too much chlorine coming up from underground when it rains heavy. Ok for us humans maybe but it wipes out my fish if I refill the pools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hchoate

Do they make an electric snake that small?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Actually, if you have lime build-up in your lines, you can put muriatic acid into an almost empty tank, and then let it fill the pipes so it can dissolve the lime. Muriatic acid is just a dilute form of hydrochloric acid. The more concentrated the muriatic acid, the quicker it will dissolve the lime. It will also kill algae and mold if they exist in your lines. It will not leave any residue in the lines after it is rinsed out. Certainly you should ensure that you run a few tanks worth of water through the lines before you use the water for anything but flushing the toilet, but after that the water is at least as safe as it was before your cleansing process. Draino has some really nasty chemicals in it that may not rinse out so easily.

 

When building here, people should really consider using larger diameter pipes. My house has one-inch polyethylene water pipes throughout. All joints are heat-welded, so there should never be any plumbing problems.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hchoate

Drano is sodium hydroxide and bits of aluminum.

 

The only reason it is dangerous is that it is so concentrated. It dissolves readily and dilutiion will make it harmless. It cannot get 'caught' anywhere to jump out and bite you later.

 

It's also not very good for cleaning pipes, only unblocking clogs.

 

Sodium hydroxide is food grade and consists of sodium ions and hydroxide ions. Sodium hydroxide has been widely used in drinking water as a pH adjusting agent and is also used in food processing. It therefore has a long history of safe use in these applications.

http://www.tomsofmaine.com/products/ingredient-list

 

Aluminum is the most plentiful metal in the earth’s crust. It is present in the environment combined with other elements such as oxygen, silicon, and fluorine.

Exposure to aluminum is usually not harmful, but exposure to high levels can cause serious health problems.

http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=164929

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

well my spa gets that thick calcium build up in the heater and i dump 5 gallons of vinegar in the spa run it a while then drain ... lots of white power comes out and vinegar is cheap

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the boss

I do a lot of plumbing for a living.

Over there who knows? But in the US run into low pressure quit often, people always think the pipes are clogged. Usually not the case. In the case of slow filling toilets or slow faucets disconnect the supply from the fixture and see if there is a increase in flow. Generally the stoppage occurs at the smallest part of the system, such as a valve, filter ,  flow restrictor or even the aireator on the faucet.

      Plus test water pressure at the supply point and then again at the source of usage. Could have just low water pressure to begin with and there will be no solution besides patience. If pressure is low and pipe size to small there is only one remedy, and it ain't Drano. Putting chemicals in or pressurizing the system could cause failure of components or catastrophe! If you damage inaccessible pipes, ect.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
goggleye

Actually, if you have lime build-up in your lines, you can put muriatic acid into an almost empty tank, and then let it fill the pipes so it can dissolve the lime. Muriatic acid is just a dilute form of hydrochloric acid. The more concentrated the muriatic acid, the quicker it will dissolve the lime. It will also kill algae and mold if they exist in your lines. It will not leave any residue in the lines after it is rinsed out. Certainly you should ensure that you run a few tanks worth of water through the lines before you use the water for anything but flushing the toilet, but after that the water is at least as safe as it was before your cleansing process. Draino has some really nasty chemicals in it that may not rinse out so easily.

 

When building here, people should really consider using larger diameter pipes. My house has one-inch polyethylene water pipes throughout. All joints are heat-welded, so there should never be any plumbing problems.

 

Headshot is dead on right  - Muriatic (Hydrochoric) is the best choice   HCl + CaCO3 ->  CaCl2 + H2O + CO2    Leave a tap open to let the pressure off from the carbon dioxide gas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SkyMan

 

HCl + CaCO3 -> CaCl2 + H2O + CO2

 

2HCl + CaCO3 -> CaCl2 + H2O + CO2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim in Cebu

Here's an article about uses and dangers of muriatic acid -- http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infxtra/infmur.html

 

Its cautions include:

[begin quote]

 

 

3) You must have adequate ventilation...  Use a fan to bring fresh air to the work area if necessary. Muriatic acid is nonflammable, but the vapors are highly corrosive and irritating.  Also, there is always the chance of a chemical reaction that will produce hydrogen gas, which is extremely flammable.  Remember the tragic explosion of the hydrogen-filled zeppelin Hindenburg?

 

4) Using muriatic acid indoors is not recommended, since the corrosive vapors can begin chemical reactions in metals that are difficult to stop, leading to long-term, permanent damage in both appliances and electronics!

 

[end quote]

 

Regarding #4, a

our relative used muriatic acid to clean the toilets in our apartment (while we were out of town and they were housesitting).  The fumes tarnished and/or pitted all of the "chrome"/steel/metal towel bars, racks, and other metal objects in the bathroom.  Towel bars that had towels on them at the time, remained shiny where the towels were, but the rest of the bar was tarnished and the holders that connect them to the walls were badly pitted.  Some of the racks and shelves for small bottles, etc., were so badly corroded that they had to be replaced when we returned.   (However, the toilets were really clean.)

 

Although I realize that the OP (original post) was about cleaning out water pipes, I thought it might be helpful to share these warnings and experiences about those that are considering muriatic acid for various cleaning projects since its use was mentioned in the thread.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
goggleye

2HCl + CaCO3 -> CaCl2 + H2O + CO2

LOL   good job on maintaining the law of conservation of matter  - Lavoisier would be so proud of you  :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the boss

Here's an article about uses and dangers of muriatic acid -- http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infxtra/infmur.html

 

Its cautions include:

[begin quote]

 

 

3) You must have adequate ventilation...  Use a fan to bring fresh air to the work area if necessary. Muriatic acid is nonflammable, but the vapors are highly corrosive and irritating.  Also, there is always the chance of a chemical reaction that will produce hydrogen gas, which is extremely flammable.  Remember the tragic explosion of the hydrogen-filled zeppelin Hindenburg?

 

4) Using muriatic acid indoors is not recommended, since the corrosive vapors can begin chemical reactions in metals that are difficult to stop, leading to long-term, permanent damage in both appliances and electronics!

 

[end quote]

 

Regarding #4, a

our relative used muriatic acid to clean the toilets in our apartment (while we were out of town and they were housesitting).  The fumes tarnished and/or pitted all of the "chrome"/steel/metal towel bars, racks, and other metal objects in the bathroom.  Towel bars that had towels on them at the time, remained shiny where the towels were, but the rest of the bar was tarnished and the holders that connect them to the walls were badly pitted.  Some of the racks and shelves for small bottles, etc., were so badly corroded that they had to be replaced when we returned.   (However, the toilets were really clean.)

 

Although I realize that the OP (original post) was about cleaning out water pipes, I thought it might be helpful to share these warnings and experiences about those that are considering muriatic acid for various cleaning projects since its use was mentioned in the thread.

Let alone what happens when it comes in contact the living organisms.

the stuff is deadly! :excl:  :excl:  :excl:

Seriously you could hurt yourself or be blinded by it.

it is something not to be taken lightly.

Edited by the boss

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
easy44

Never use muriatic in vitreous china fixtures such as a toilet.  It will eat away at the surface of the china resulting in a rough surface.  Part of the charm of vitreous china is that it is very slick and the shit just flushes away.  After muriatic, although it will look nice and white, you will start experiencing frequent blockages.  Don't ask me how I know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Sailfish Bay Fishing Charters

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..