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OK, why concrete all the way up?


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Mandingo

What more details do you want? I just gave you them. Shade (man-made or otherwise), insulation and air movement. Height is good too in a city environment. More airflow. Our main living areas are on the second and third floors (out of four).

How did you insulate the concrete if you don't mind me asking? :)

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I didn't even bother with the concrete part! My coco lumber house is 12 years old now and termites haven't been a problem. I think that the concrete just holds in the heat! One of the other mistakes i

Personally I think wooden houses are fine in typhoon conditions. Airplanes are built of wood that deal with speeds far in excess of 180kph.   You can design a cool concrete house. The problem is tha

Here are my thoughts on concrete verses wood or steel frame houses.   Concrete houses here are mostly all "post and beam".  Walls of reinforced and filled CHB with an inch of concrete applied to bot

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hchoate

 

A rooftop slab

 

I started the thread leery of concrete above my head in an earthquake zone- now I'm really cringing. I'm assuming 'slab' implies concrete.

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Headshot

I think whether or not you are able to go without air conditioning has more to do with your own heat tolerance than with how your house is constructed (ceiling height, wall materials, colors, shading, whatever). Sure those things can affect the temperature inside the home, but chances are that the temperature inside the home won't be much less than the temperature outside (in the shade). If you can handle that temperature, then you can forego A/C.

 

I, too, was leery of having concrete over my head, but when the second floor on my home is complete, that is exactly what we will have. However, we will have large steel I-beams and steel floor sheeting (the kind used in commercial buildings) supporting a steel-reinforced concrete slab, so I doubt we will be in any danger.

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hyaku

Is it so hot in the Philippines? I find it overbearing in town (concrete jungle) out in the country it's cool. I think it's a major consideration one chooses a piece of land well before building. Sometimes if it's very cheap you have to find out why e.g services, noise, security.

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smokey

Is it so hot in the Philippines? I find it overbearing in town (concrete jungle) out in the country it's cool. I think it's a major consideration one chooses a piece of land well before building. Sometimes if it's very cheap you have to find out why e.g services, noise, security.

and why do you have to live in the province to have space and air ???

 

post-35-0-04789200-1374899125_thumb.jpg

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hchoate

 

steel floor sheeting (the kind used in commercial buildings) supporting a steel-reinforced concrete slab

 

Well, I don't get it. As discussed, concrete is used to withstand earthquake and typhoon (fireproof, too, occurs to me) but steel by itself is likewise. In what you describe the concrete sounds redundant/unnecessary.

 

A concrete structure with a concrete roof/ceiling sounds more like a bunker, seems to me. Not criticizing, just mystified.

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CebuKano

I started the thread leery of concrete above my head in an earthquake zone- now I'm really cringing. I'm assuming 'slab' implies concrete.

Our fourth floor is just a regular reinforced concrete slab. I have no worries about earthquakes. It's built quite well.

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Doromaner

I didn't even bother with the concrete part! My coco lumber house is 12 years old now and termites haven't been a problem. I think that the concrete just holds in the heat! One of the other mistakes is double walls in a timber house, they just give the beasties somewhere to hide.

 

I've often though of building a "log cabin" style house, using coco!

 

There are some Styro houses near me. You use 4 inch styro for the walls, cover it in chicken wire mesh, and render it with concrete.

 

If I were going to do concrete, I'd dig a basement! Nice and cool underground, and you could have an almost sound proof bedroom.

So, if you don't use double walls what do you put on the inside of the wall studs? You have wood on the outside of the studs, what about putting amakan on the inside of the studs? Or what do you suggest so the termites can't hide?

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thebob

 

So, if you don't use double walls what do you put on the inside of the wall studs?

 

Nothing, make the studs decorative.

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Headshot

Well, I don't get it. As discussed, concrete is used to withstand earthquake and typhoon (fireproof, too, occurs to me) but steel by itself is likewise. In what you describe the concrete sounds redundant/unnecessary.

 

A concrete structure with a concrete roof/ceiling sounds more like a bunker, seems to me. Not criticizing, just mystified.

Well, I don't get it. As discussed, concrete is used to withstand earthquake and typhoon (fireproof, too, occurs to me) but steel by itself is likewise. In what you describe the concrete sounds redundant/unnecessary.

 

A concrete structure with a concrete roof/ceiling sounds more like a bunker, seems to me. Not criticizing, just mystified.

 

Here is the stuff I'm talking about.

 

post-6379-0-42202600-1374937602_thumb.jpg

 

http://www.metaldeck.com/floor_deck.htm

 

It is used in almost all high-rise buildings in the West, and allows you to pour a floor without first building a supporting wood structure (that must be removed after the pour is done). It is very quick to use, and allows a continuous pour in minimal time. It also adds to the strength of a steel-reinforced concrete floor slab, thereby making it even more earthquake resistant while at the same time allowing a thinner concrete slab. The bottom of the floor is not actually the ceiling of the floor below. That ceiling is at the bottom of the I-beams that support the second floor, and is connected to steel purlins. The ceiling will be finished sheet rock. The space between the floor and ceiling is used for utility runs (water, sewer, electrical, phone, TV, security, A/C). The use of steel floor deck saves time, it saves money, and it saves weight. It is a well-tested and widely used flooring system.

 

Look here (at the bottom right corner of the page) to see how the system is used...

 

http://www.metaldeckdirect.com/index_FloorDeck.htm

 

I almost forgot to add...steel floor deck is available here in the Philippines.

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smokey

Here is the stuff I'm talking about.

 

attachicon.giffloor deck.jpg

 

http://www.metaldeck.com/floor_deck.htm

 

It is used in almost all high-rise buildings in the West, and allows you to pour a floor without first building a supporting wood structure (that must be removed after the pour is done). It is very quick to use, and allows a continuous pour in minimal time. It also adds to the strength of a steel-reinforced concrete floor slab, thereby making it even more earthquake resistant while at the same time allowing a thinner concrete slab. The bottom of the floor is not actually the ceiling of the floor below. That ceiling is at the bottom of the I-beams that support the second floor, and is connected to steel purlins. The ceiling will be finished sheet rock. The space between the floor and ceiling is used for utility runs (water, sewer, electrical, phone, TV, security, A/C). The use of steel floor deck saves time, it saves money, and it saves weight. It is a well-tested and widely used flooring system.

 

Look here (at the bottom right corner of the page) to see how the system is used...

 

http://www.metaldeckdirect.com/index_FloorDeck.htm

like the ceiling of the LTO in talisay
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smokey

Well not next to a road, that's for sure.

that road is a dead end and the only people who use it is ME
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hchoate

Here is the stuff I'm talking about.

 

attachicon.giffloor deck.jpg

 

http://www.metaldeck.com/floor_deck.htm

 

It is used in almost all high-rise buildings in the West, and allows you to pour a floor without first building a supporting wood structure (that must be removed after the pour is done). It is very quick to use, and allows a continuous pour in minimal time. It also adds to the strength of a steel-reinforced concrete floor slab, thereby making it even more earthquake resistant while at the same time allowing a thinner concrete slab. The bottom of the floor is not actually the ceiling of the floor below. That ceiling is at the bottom of the I-beams that support the second floor, and is connected to steel purlins. The ceiling will be finished sheet rock. The space between the floor and ceiling is used for utility runs (water, sewer, electrical, phone, TV, security, A/C). The use of steel floor deck saves time, it saves money, and it saves weight. It is a well-tested and widely used flooring system.

 

Look here (at the bottom right corner of the page) to see how the system is used...

 

http://www.metaldeckdirect.com/index_FloorDeck.htm

 

Very cool I admit. But probably way too much for my budget. I can't honestly say I've ever noticed a concrete floor in an upper story- except maybe a parking garage. I'm thinking if I build to stick to a single story anyway. But I'm going to have to live there a while and experience several different situations before I have any sense of what I gotta have.

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