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OK, why concrete all the way up?


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hchoate

Have not heard of one unless you're in a flood prone area, you might get an unwanted underground swimming pool.

 

Yeah, have always hated basements for that reason- just a swimming pool you try to keep water OUT of. I think backfilling with earth gives same benefit. Plus digging is expensive.

 

And again, aren't concrete houses like an oven?

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I didn't even bother with the concrete part! My coco lumber house is 12 years old now and termites haven't been a problem. I think that the concrete just holds in the heat! One of the other mistakes i

Personally I think wooden houses are fine in typhoon conditions. Airplanes are built of wood that deal with speeds far in excess of 180kph.   You can design a cool concrete house. The problem is tha

Here are my thoughts on concrete verses wood or steel frame houses.   Concrete houses here are mostly all "post and beam".  Walls of reinforced and filled CHB with an inch of concrete applied to bot

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Any Filipino superstitions about being below ground?

 

Yes. Many Filipinos believe that ghosts will inhabit any underground space in a building. That is why you don't find many basements here. I actually planned to have a basement here, but my wife asked me what I was going to do with it. She told me that she wasn't really comfortable going into basements (even though she is well educated), and that we would have great difficulty keeping domestic helpers, since they would believe that any house with a basement would have to be haunted.

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Yeah, have always hated basements for that reason- just a swimming pool you try to keep water OUT of. I think backfilling with earth gives same benefit. Plus digging is expensive.

 

And again, aren't concrete houses like an oven?

 

Definitely almost like in an oven. One solution to minimize the heat is to put foam insulators underneath the roofing, I might have even read it here and it does help keeping the heat away during daytime and it's relatively cheap.

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hchoate

Yes. Many Filipinos believe that ghosts will inhabit any underground space in a building. That is why you don't find many basements here. I actually planned to have a basement here, but my wife asked me what I was going to do with it. She told me that she wasn't really comfortable going into basements (even though she is well educated), and that we would have great difficulty keeping domestic helpers, since they would believe that any house with a basement would have to be haunted.

 

Ya. I figured (there's those instincts again).

 

Hopefully, keeping everything above grade and piling soil up around the outside does not qualify as 'under' ground.

 

Something to keep in mind though if one has particularly pesky relatives or thieves. Maybe a fake 'basement' door. LOL

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goldote

I've seen one pig enclosure dug into the rock with a deeper drain pipe.

Seemed to stay dry when not in use. 

Some areas may have too much seismic activity.  Ormoc, Iloilo, Mayon volcanoe. 

Might be wise to dig a covered fish pond or pool as a test.

Live in a new native wood house while they build your secured basement.

Then ask the neighbors to carry it to cover your new 'foundation'. 

Let it leak that a guy died died building it....and no hidden treasure was found.

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SirMadrigal

The Local Gangsters gearing up for a new model of concrete shoes

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philuk

Any Filipino superstitions about being below ground?

 I had the idea of building a house upside down with the bedrooms underground,  make for quieter, cooler and darker bedrooms,

 i have seen some houses built this way in the Canary islands, ( not much  rain there, perhaps one inch a year if they are lucky, so no chance of flooding the underground floor space

 

But in the philippines they believe that underground is for dead people

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hchoate

 

But in the philippines they believe that underground is for dead people

 

I seem to remember them putting the dead into above-ground concrete boxes ...

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philuk

I seem to remember them putting the dead into above-ground concrete boxes ...

 

Yes but it maters not where they put them it is a superstition, The trouble i had designing my house, (yet to be built), Oro plata mata, doors cant line up, stairs has to rise with the morning sun, roof ridge has to line up up with nearby mountains front door must not face against the flow of a nearby river,,,

 

And list just goes on and on and on and on

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hchoate

Yes but it maters not where they put them it is a superstition, The trouble i had designing my house, (yet to be built), Oro plata mata, doors cant line up, stairs has to rise with the morning sun, roof ridge has to line up up with nearby mountains front door must not face against the flow of a nearby river,,,

 

And list just goes on and on and on and on

 

I hope anyone trying to decide whether to rent, buy or build is reading this.

 

http://positivelyfilipino.com/magazine/2013/3/building-a-house-oro-plata-mata

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Here are my thoughts on concrete verses wood or steel frame houses.

 

Concrete houses here are mostly all "post and beam".  Walls of reinforced and filled CHB with an inch of concrete applied to both sides is VERY strong.  Look at pics from the last several typhoon hit areas and the only buildings standing are concrete.  They may not have roofs but are still standing.  The missing roofs were most likely wood trussed and not secured to the walls sufficiently. Do any of you guys with wood framed houses really think your place will stand up to 120-180 kph winds???

The biggest issue I had with steel frame was securing it to the foundation.  Expansion bolts or J bolts are useless unless they are in at least six inches and have 2 feet of concrete around all sides.

Concrete walls are solid verses cavity walls like wood or steel frame.  Fill the cavities with insulation and you are providing food or nesting material for many critters.  If water ever gets in the cavities then many problems are soon to follow.

The biggest con about concrete houses is heat retention.  That is a major concern for multiple story houses.  I have lived in 2 two story places in PI and they were real sweat boxes.  The 2 one story places I've lived were not so bad if windows and interior doors were opened.  Add a couple ceiling fans and you are golden.

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thebob

 

Do any of you guys with wood framed houses really think your place will stand up to 120-180 kph winds???

 

Personally I think wooden houses are fine in typhoon conditions. Airplanes are built of wood that deal with speeds far in excess of 180kph.

 

You can design a cool concrete house. The problem is that architects aren't engineers and they focus on aesthetics not practicality. 

 

Post and beam, CHB houses are built to be low maintenance and cheap to build. The structure itself is generally less than 30% or the finished price.

 

For my lifestyle a series of connected sealed boxes isn't a practical answer to living here. The typical "sub-division" house, wastes the outside which is where you want to be most of the time.

 

If you think of a hotel room that you like and start by building that with on suite out of CHB as a bungalow. Building permit will be cheap, you get power and water on site, you have somewhere secure to stay. This will be your survival cell if the rest of your structure blows away.

 

Then you can make additions, a nice living area , enclosed kitchen, other bedrooms if necessary. Building a series of bungalows with a central living dining area, connected by covered walkways, gives you the option to rent out some rooms without loosing your privacy.

 

I think the longer that you stay here your ideas on habitation will change. Once you have built your first bungalow, you will have a good idea on your crew and your techniques. It is easier to just hire a new crew for each addition.

 

The concept here of a "sala" for entertaining, keeping the rest of your living area private, is a tried and tested system. 

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Knowdafish

 

The biggest con about concrete houses is heat retention.  That is a major concern for multiple story houses.

 

Very true. The trick is to have a well insulated attic area and large roof overhangs. Shade and insulation is the key. 

 

A well placed tree that offers shade for the afternoon sunny side of the house is a bonus. 

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fred42

 

Very true. The trick is to have a well insulated attic area and large roof overhangs. Shade and insulation is the key. 

 

A well placed tree that offers shade for the afternoon sunny side of the house is a bonus. 

 
 
 
Agreed about shade... Its a no brainer IMO.. Our eves are 3 meters long in parts and the walls are shaded from dawn till dusk.
One thing that I have always noticed here though is absolutely useless roof design for the climate..
Most metal roofs here are sealed at the top and very little ventilation in the eves..Sometimes,the owners heavily insulate above ceilings to try to stop the ever increasing downward heat from a metal roof from entering the house.. This can get expensive IMO.
The roof we just designed for our latest building here has a large vent at top level from one end to the other and large latticed (open eves) at the bottom which produces a convection effect basically ventilating the whole attic area releasing hot air through the top....
Don't fight nature or physics..
Use it!.
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Davaoeno

 

The roof we just designed for our latest building here has a large vent at top level from one end to the other and large latticed (open eves) at the bottom which produces a convection effect basically ventilating the whole attic area releasing hot air through the top...

 

 

sounds interesting . Would you be willing to scan and post a copy of the basic design here ?  [ just your first rough copies would be fine ]

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