Jump to content

OK, why concrete all the way up?


Recommended Posts

hchoate

Seems maybe up to waist high would be sufficient.

 

A concrete box (with metal roof!) just looks like an oven to me.

 

And it weighs a lot so footings have to be more substantial.

 

'Earthquakes' I believe is a common answer- I have lived in coastal California and having concrete above my head is not a comforting idea.

 

Maybe wood is too light for typhoon winds? But then there are bamboo houses.

 

Wood doesn't last maybe, too expensive?

 

Enlighten me, please.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 83
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • hchoate

    14

  • CebuKano

    8

  • Headshot

    7

  • hyaku

    6

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I didn't even bother with the concrete part! My coco lumber house is 12 years old now and termites haven't been a problem. I think that the concrete just holds in the heat! One of the other mistakes i

Personally I think wooden houses are fine in typhoon conditions. Airplanes are built of wood that deal with speeds far in excess of 180kph.   You can design a cool concrete house. The problem is tha

Here are my thoughts on concrete verses wood or steel frame houses.   Concrete houses here are mostly all "post and beam".  Walls of reinforced and filled CHB with an inch of concrete applied to bot

Posted Images

CebuKano

Typhoons. A direct hit by a catagory 5 will destroy just about everything but reinforced concrete.

Link to post
Share on other sites
towboat72

we built a house much like you are talking about  cement 4 ft up wood on top.it works was cheap but now im fighting a termite problem.

I was not there when it was built  so the wood was not treated and that was a big mistake ,but I do like the house

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
hchoate

OK. So I must use treated wood and build where a typhoon has not destroyed everthing but reinforced concrete within living memory.

 

Other considerations?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Typhoons. A direct hit by a catagory 5 will destroy just about everything but reinforced concrete.

as this might be true 

unless you make the roof out of concrete as well its a waste of afford

and also windows  

Link to post
Share on other sites

well there is a lof of difference 

its more on where and how much you like to spend 

some place you can not build concrete and some and some you cant use lumber 

and also your style 

while in europe is mostly brick hollow blocks concrete  all the way up 

in usa its lumber top to bottom 

if you are on the mountain concrete house will go down after few heavy rains unless you spend fortune and go deep enough to attach  it to rocks under 

while lumber house will sit just about anywhere 

so it is all up to where and your style 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
CebuKano

as this might be true 

unless you make the roof out of concrete as well its a waste of afford

and also windows  

Very true. The outside of the structure needs to be reinforced concrete top to bottom with good footings. If it's not one would be a fool to ride out a direct hit from a super typhoon. Windows can be shuttered with either storm shutters or regular plywood prior to the storm hitting. We have storm shutters (metal) ready and waiting if needed that can be put in place in an hour or so.

Link to post
Share on other sites
thebob

I didn't even bother with the concrete part! My coco lumber house is 12 years old now and termites haven't been a problem. I think that the concrete just holds in the heat! One of the other mistakes is double walls in a timber house, they just give the beasties somewhere to hide.

 

I've often though of building a "log cabin" style house, using coco!

 

There are some Styro houses near me. You use 4 inch styro for the walls, cover it in chicken wire mesh, and render it with concrete.

 

If I were going to do concrete, I'd dig a basement! Nice and cool underground, and you could have an almost sound proof bedroom.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
CebuKano

I didn't even bother with the concrete part! My coco lumber house is 12 years old now and termites haven't been a problem. I think that the concrete just holds in the heat! One of the other mistakes is double walls in a timber house, they just give the beasties somewhere to hide.

 

I've often though of building a "log cabin" style house, using coco!

 

There are some Styro houses near me. You use 4 inch styro for the walls, cover it in chicken wire mesh, and render it with concrete.

 

If I were going to do concrete, I'd dig a basement! Nice and cool underground, and you could have an almost sound proof bedroom.

I actually considered digging a basement but the ground is solid rock and the guys would probably still be digging today :D no way to get a backhoe in ... Very cool concept though...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
hchoate

My coco lumber house is 12 years old now and termites haven't been a problem

 

Why no termite problem do you suppose?

 

 

4 inch styro for the walls, cover it in chicken wire mesh, and render it with concrete

 

Concrete adds no structural strength in that case.

 

 

Nice and cool underground, and you could have an almost sound proof bedroom.

 

Now there's an idea. Concrete part way up, backfill with earth if below grade is an issue.

 

Any Filipino superstitions about being below ground?

Edited by hchoate
Link to post
Share on other sites
thebob

 

I actually considered digging a basement but the ground is solid rock and the guys would probably still be digging today no way to get a backhoe in ... Very cool concept though...

 

If it's solid rock it's even better. Buy a large rock saw to cut the basement out, and use the stone blocks that you cut to build the house.

 

Why no termite problem do you suppose?

 

 

 

Concrete adds no structural strength in that case.

 

 

 

Now there's an idea. Concrete part way up, backfill with earth if below grade is an issue.

 

Any Filipino superstitions about being below ground?

 

 I treated the wood for termites.

 

Hollow block isn't structural either, but an inch of skim is surprisingly strong.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
SkyMan

 

I actually considered digging a basement but the ground is solid rock and the guys would probably still be digging today no way to get a backhoe in ... Very cool concept though...

That would be perfect.  Gives you the opportunity for some blasting.  Woohoo!
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
hyaku

We are on side of the mountain. Ground floor on the front extending to a downstairs room at the back that's the kitchen. It's cool in the mountain but I did insulate the roof. All concrete. I don't even use a fan let alone an aircon. Windows on every side keep us cool. The last room I upgraded has an awning. It's termite city up here. Woods out of the question. If I built a new house I would live upstairs and sleep down.

Edited by hyaku
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
BFHammer

www.environmentalhouse.com  For the RP bill might even give his formula cheap.  Mix chipped styro/wood into the concrete mix to become an insulator and still be 300mph+ wind rated.

 

The basement is a great idea especially if you design the house with channels and turn it into a geothermal heat pump both heating and cooling the house with zero costs.

www.enertia.com 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Any Filipino superstitions about being below ground?

 

Have not heard of one unless you're in a flood prone area, you might get an unwanted underground swimming pool.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...