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What Google's Chromecast Has That All the Other Web-to-TV Devices Don't


 


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Rebecca Greenfield
14 hours ago


Technology & ElectronicsGoogleNetflixApple TV

 



Google today announced a new Internet-to-television device
called Chromecast, a well-developed area of technology that doesn't
really need another gizmo. With Apple TV, Roku and Boxee all providing
solutions to turn a regular old HDTV into an Internet-capable TV, you
might be thinking that the Chromecast is an also-ran before it's even
been released.

Yet Chromecast, as it's called, has the techies all giddy. A few of them said they already went on over to the Play store and bought one
— before Google had even finished up its event. The general upshot of
the stick is that it ports the television on your computer or smartphone
— like Netflix, or YouTube — to your television. A lot of devices can
already do this for you. So what makes this thing any different or
better than all the others?

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  •         It's dirt cheap. The
    stick only costs $35. Roku's similar dongle-type streamer retails for
    $100. There's a huge mental difference between $100 and $35. It's easy
    to splurge on something that costs less than an Urban Outfitters shirt.
    In addition, Netflix users — new and existing — get three months of the
    streaming service free, essentially paying for most of the stick. (Three
    months of streaming costs, at minimum $24.)
  •         It's teeny tiny.
    Most of these magic TV things come in box form. This is just a stick
    that goes into an HDMI port. There's also zero set-up. It just plugs in,
    you hook it up to your Wi-Fi and you tap a small button in compatible
    apps or the Chrome browser, and like magic it pushes that stuff to your
    TV.
  •         It Has More Content Than Meets the Eye.
    The official Google partnerships don't amount to more than, say, Roku
    has on its box. The stick officially works with YouTube, Netflix, and
    Google Play Movies and TV. But there's a secret trick for getting all
    other web streaming services — like HBO GO (!) — from laptop to
    computer: Chrome tab projection. Per the demo, any tab open on the
    Chrome browser will play on the television. So, the HBO GO app might not
    work, but the desktop version will. Sure a computer connected by HDMI
    can do that, too. But this is a lot easier, smaller, and does a lot more
    (and again, no wires). Google has almost made available a software kit
    that will allow developers to add the functionality to their apps,
    meaning that, if the Chromecast catches on, you'll be able to beam video
    from any smartphone or tablet app directly to your television.
  •         It Works with a Lot of Phones.
    This works on both Android and iOS, meaning you can swap out phones or
    tablets or computers with different subscription services, or movies
    downloaded. It opens up a lot more content, and if you're making the
    switch from iOS to Android, you aren't stuck with a box that can't
    stream your smartphone content, like you would be with Apple TV.
  •         It Turns (Almost) Every TV into a Smart TV. Any
    television with an HDMI port — so probably not that old clunker you
    bought on Craigslist — turns into a "smart" TV, with your phone or
    tablet or laptop as the remote control, allowing you to play videos,
    control volume, or even turn on the TV.

The whole thing
makes watching TV from your phone or computer seamless and at $35 people
who watch a lot of streaming TV from Netflix have almost no reason to
buy it. Without the Chrome tab projection thing the whole offering gets a
little less enticing. But at least for now it looks like a more elegant
way to connect HDMI to multiple devices by just plugging in.

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Salty Dog

I already have Apple TV and Roku that can do most of the same stuff. The big thing is you need to fool the services like Netflix and others that your in the USA. I do this by using a service called UnBlock US that cost me $4.99 a month. It helps if you have a little understanding of how to set up your DNS on your devices or your router. I can even fool Netflix into thinking I'm in any of 10 different countries. This is good because many movies that they don't have streaming in USA are available in other countries.

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  • 2 months later...

I already have Apple TV and Roku that can do most of the same stuff. The big thing is you need to fool the services like Netflix and others that your in the USA. I do this by using a service called UnBlock US that cost me $4.99 a month. It helps if you have a little understanding of how to set up your DNS on your devices or your router. I can even fool Netflix into thinking I'm in any of 10 different countries. This is good because many movies that they don't have streaming in USA are available in other countries.

 

 

Do you have a limit to how many GB you can download per month with your provider and if so how much is it and which one is it

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Salty Dog

Do you have a limit to how many GB you can download per month with your provider and if so how much is it and which one is it

 

No limit as far as I can tell. I've downloaded as much as 10-15Gb a day. It's Globe Torque 10Mbps for P3999. You get free installation, free WiFi modem with 4 ports for Ethernet, Free Globe Tattoo stick with 40 free hours a month data use, free phone with free land-line and free calls to Globe and TM.

 

They have speeds from 3Mbps up to 150Mbps. The lock-in is 24 months, but I think it was only P5000 to cancel it early.

 

I had 3Mbps in Dumaguete and my Apple TV still worked, but you couldn't use Apples HD unless you wanted to wait a few hours for it to load. I had my Apple TV set for standard and it was still much better than cable. It was more like DVD quality. As for Netflix I had it set for best quality and it just adjust based on current download speed.

 

My 3Mbs never got better than 2Mbs. My 10Mbps never gets better than 8.8Mbps, most times it's around 8Mbps. 

 

http://tattoo.globe.com.ph/promos/tattoo-home-broadband-ultra-high-speed-plans-premium-boosters

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