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BossHog

An Accidental Locavore

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BossHog

Let me preface this by saying I don't think food is a political issue and have never gone in for hippy-dippy  eating trends...

 

Over the past few years I've found myself eating more and more only the things that are from this island. I'd say it's up to 95% at this point.

 

Good quality fruits and veg are a no-brainer. We grow ampalaya, string beans, tomatoes, squash, peppers, cabbage, etc. Fruit grown on site: pineapple, mango, papaya, guava, jackfruit, lime, durian, banana, lanzones, and avocado. We do buy apples and oranges and I'm pretty sure they're imported.

 

Some of the bought produce is grown using pesticides so it's hardly 100% organic.

 

Our rice comes from a field about a kilometer away that we have leased.

 

Protein: fresh fish is delivered every morning:yellow fin, blue marlin, wahoo, etc. Chicken and ducks along with their eggs we raise ourselves. Breed hogs and goats for sale and for parties. I've stopped eating beef in this country. Eat carabao at weddings. We grow peanuts but they're kinda small.

 

Flour and coffee has to be brought in from the mainland.

 

Grow cacao to make hot chocolate which is awesome with freshly made churros

 

Imported items for personal consumption are limited to Vegemite, olive oil, Quaker oats, Korean/Japanese soy sauce, wasabi paste, Chinese cooking wine, French (not French's!) mustard, Heinz 57 ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, and a few other condiments.

 

We don't have trash/garbage pick-up here so the reduction in packing means we don't have to burn/bury a lot of plastic.

 

The health advantages of not having hormones in the food is important to me. Our youngest eats a lot of chicken and we slaughter at least one a day.

 

 

I'm not militant in the least about this diet, it just kind of worked out that way. When my friends come back from Europe with sausage and other treats it's a happy day.

 

I feel almost no food cravings from overseas and a local diet just makes more sense over time.

 

Oddly, my wife and daughters eat more imported food than I do. Go figure.

 

Cleaner, healthier, cheaper and your money for purchased food goes directly to the farmers, who are neighbors.

 

That being said almost 80% of the ingredients used in our resto are imported. Black olives, capers, mozzarella, pepperoni, quality anchovies, etc would be nigh impossible to grow/produce locally.

 

Yes, I'm bored and it's a rainy afternoon. Thanks for listening.

 

 

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Siuk

Living in a small city it's not difficult to resist imported goods. Mostly not there anyway. 

 

Not a big deal to me, I eat very well without all the imported processed food available in larger cities. Lots of fresh produce, and I catch my own fish (going squid fishing tomorrow morning). Locally we buy Lea and Perrins Worcestershire sauce and Crisco shortening, which is about it on the shopping list.  Last trip to CDO bought some imported liquid smoke and McVities digestives as a treat (for me, I gave my wife one biscuit...).    I do have a stock of imported Indian spices from the Indian grocery store in Cebu City, but other than that I have no cravings at all same as you.  LBC me some of those European sausages I'd be very grateful though.

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BossHog

 

going squid fishing tomorrow morning

 

Good luck!

 

Sometime, get a few petromax lanterns for the boat and go out at night.

 

If you get some squid try sauteing it with crispy pork belly and a chili sauce.

 

Squid and pork have a natural affinity.

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Wolfpack

Let me preface this by saying I don't think food is a political issue and have never gone in for hippy-dippy  eating trends...

 

Over the past few years I've found myself eating more and more only the things that are from this island. I'd say it's up to 95% at this point.

 

Good quality fruits and veg are a no-brainer. We grow ampalaya, string beans, tomatoes, squash, peppers, cabbage, etc. Fruit grown on site: pineapple, mango, papaya, guava, jackfruit, lime, durian, banana, lanzones, and avocado. We do buy apples and oranges and I'm pretty sure they're imported.

 

Some of the bought produce is grown using pesticides so it's hardly 100% organic.

 

Our rice comes from a field about a kilometer away that we have leased.

 

Protein: fresh fish is delivered every morning:yellow fin, blue marlin, wahoo, etc. Chicken and ducks along with their eggs we raise ourselves. Breed hogs and goats for sale and for parties. I've stopped eating beef in this country. Eat carabao at weddings. We grow peanuts but they're kinda small.

 

Flour and coffee has to be brought in from the mainland.

 

Grow cacao to make hot chocolate which is awesome with freshly made churros

 

Imported items for personal consumption are limited to Vegemite, olive oil, Quaker oats, Korean/Japanese soy sauce, wasabi paste, Chinese cooking wine, French (not French's!) mustard, Heinz 57 ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, and a few other condiments.

 

We don't have trash/garbage pick-up here so the reduction in packing means we don't have to burn/bury a lot of plastic.

 

The health advantages of not having hormones in the food is important to me. Our youngest eats a lot of chicken and we slaughter at least one a day.

 

 

I'm not militant in the least about this diet, it just kind of worked out that way. When my friends come back from Europe with sausage and other treats it's a happy day.

 

I feel almost no food cravings from overseas and a local diet just makes more sense over time.

 

Oddly, my wife and daughters eat more imported food than I do. Go figure.

 

Cleaner, healthier, cheaper and your money for purchased food goes directly to the farmers, who are neighbors.

 

That being said almost 80% of the ingredients used in our resto are imported. Black olives, capers, mozzarella, pepperoni, quality anchovies, etc would be nigh impossible to grow/produce locally.

 

Yes, I'm bored and it's a rainy afternoon. Thanks for listening.

 

about 72 hours of that   12 hours of that and I would lose the WILL to live!!!

 

Seriously, I have raised pigs...and find they are intelligent animals...I have fed them apples from my hand...and I do not have the heart to slaughter them...

 

In my time here in the Philippines I have raised a cow, goats, chickens, cats, dogs and even a giant lizard (he moved in to our ceiling)...we have trees for fruit...but people steal everything...my wife cut a tree down when someone stole fruit from it...

 

I am done playing the native game...but mostly because I am tried of saving money and making sacifices...only to give the money away...because someone always needs it...

 

I now enjoy life each day...spend my monthly budget...and eat like I have always eaten...and then some...

 

My recent discovery of the awesome buffet deals at resorts gives my wife a break and are really great food...

 

The imported food available here in Cebu gets better and better every day...and then a few members have brought some items that are not avaialble here...which is an added bonus...

 

 

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smokey

well have to agree with you on the native game... my wife took over a 3 hector farm had it all cleaned up planted and before she could harvest it was taken and the word is she is married to a foreigner she dont NEED food we do... her biggest complaint is none of the lazy people who took the harvest lifted a finger to farm it or clean the weeds.. we have loaned out 137,000 to 11 different people these were LOANS and so far we have gotten back almost 16,000 of it...we dont count the money given for medical,,, death in the family , type emergency that is not a loan she finally now spends her money on her and me of course she budgets herself 150 us a week and spends every penny and good for her

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BossHog

Being a locavore has nothing to do with "going native".

 

It involves sourcing your ingredients near where you live, if possible.

 

For example, seared tuna steaks that are pink in the middle served with a mango-papaya-avocado salsa.

 

Everything in the recipe is from the island but the locals wouldn't touch it.

 

Homemade rillettes of smoked fish or duck pate are other good examples.

 

When we slaughter a hog I'll make my own headcheese in aspic. Again hardly native fare.

 

Chipirones en cervesa, small squid in a beer/tomato sauce is another family favourite.

 

Minced clams, the kids collect them in the river, with a white sauce over homemade pasta. mmm.

 

 

 

I've never eaten better and it's hardly a compromise. It's about procuring ingredients locally not about limiting oneself to the local diet.

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Siuk

 

Homemade rillettes of smoked fish or duck pate are other good examples.

 

My neighbour keeps ducks.  I've seen them eat dogshit, so I'll pass on that particular local meat.

 

 

I've never eaten better and it's hardly a compromise. It's about procuring ingredients locally not about limiting oneself to the local diet.

 

Exactly. Never eaten such a diverse and interesting diet. I eat a lot of food (probably even more than mr wonderful), and I have to enjoy what I eat.  It's not about saving money and making sacrifices. If I want something which is imported, and I do occasionally, I'll buy it, but I really don't stress about it anymore.  When I first arrived here in '07 I did buy a lot of imported food, and I'm eating better now than I was then.

 

Eating what is available here does not mean you have to cook local recipes, which for the most part I don't like.

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Wolfpack

Being a locavore has nothing to do with "going native".

 

It involves sourcing your ingredients near where you live, if possible.

 

For example, seared tuna steaks that are pink in the middle served with a mango-papaya-avocado salsa.

 

Everything in the recipe is from the island but the locals wouldn't touch it.

 

Homemade rillettes of smoked fish or duck pate are other good examples.

 

When we slaughter a hog I'll make my own headcheese in aspic. Again hardly native fare.

 

Chipirones en cervesa, small squid in a beer/tomato sauce is another family favourite.

 

Minced clams, the kids collect them in the river, with a white sauce over homemade pasta. mmm.

 

 

 

I've never eaten better and it's hardly a compromise. It's about procuring ingredients locally not about limiting oneself to the local diet.

 

You sound more like Uncle Jesse than Boss Hogg...

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Wolfpack

Eating what is available here does not mean you have to cook local recipes, which for the most part I don't like.

 

I have 3 small children...and getting them to drink milk each day...the imported California Milk is something they like...it is debatable which is healthier...than the powedered local stuff or imported California Milk...but I am going with imported...I am surely not gonna milk a cow in the morning...nor a goat for that matter...but go for it man, more power to ya...

 

Been feeding the kids the local mangoes, bananas and rice...my wife puts milo on the rice...not sure where she learned that one...but I learned somewhere that chocolate is an antitoxin...sounds good to me...that is about the extent of local foods for my family...but when one considers the amount of rice they eat...that is over 50 percent of THEIR diet...

 

I am not going to make pasta from scratch...so I go with imported pasta...I am not gonna try to make gravey (aka pasta sauce for non-italians) with local ingredients...too much can go wrong there and I will end up in the ER...

 

I like sausage...both for pasta and breakfast...I am surely not going to be making my own sausage...Johnsonville does just fine...and thank God...Johnsonville sausage is available here...

 

I am not going to make breads (and donuts) in the house...again, too much can go wrong...and breads make up over 50 percent of MY diet...I am sure making your own baked goods works fine for you...

 

I like good wine...this is most likely...my biggest expense...and I am NOT going to make my own wine...I suppose you go for the coconut wine?

 

I import water...and I drink a lot of water...I am sure the local water is no issue for you...

 

Heck, I like peanut butter and jam...and while making jam is something my grandmother would do...the imported options do me just fine...I would imagine you could make your own peanut butter and maybe some mango jam?

 

The items that I have mentioned here...are not exciting...but they keep me healthy...and keeps my family healthy...

 

For enjoyment...I recently discovered the buffets that the resorts put together...they are affordable meals...they are good meals...and it gives my wife a break not just from cooking...but the cleanup up that follows...

 

Listen, you guys figured out how to live off the land here...God bless you...it ain't for me...but thanks for sharing your experience...

Edited by Mr. Wonderful
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hchoate

 

I would imagine you could make your own peanut butter

 

Roasted or raw all you do is grind peanuts or any other nut.

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