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Guy60417

"Settled Science": CDC Says, "Oops, Never Mind" on Salt

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Guy60417
How many scare stories have you read about salt, telling us to drastically reduce our salt intake immediately or die next week of a heart attack?

 

Well, it ain't true.

 


 

CDC says Americans still consume too much, but studies show no benefit in reducing salt

 

A recent report from the CDC reviewed the health benefits of reducing salt and say that, even though Americans consume too much salt, major reductions is no longer considered a substantial health hazard. The CDC even reported that reducing salt intake to below 1 tsp per day may be dangerous to your health.

 

Absent from the CDC study was the difference between healthy mineral salts and iodized table salt. Most of the studies, including one from the National Academies Institute of Medicine (IOM) showed no relationship between salt and a person’s health.

 

One study from 2011, followed 28,800 subjects with high blood pressure ages 55 and older. The study followed them for 4.7 years and measured their salt intake through urinalysis. The report stated the risks of heart attacks, strokes, congestive heart failure and death from heart disease increased significantly for those consuming more than 7,000 milligrams of sodium a day and for those consuming fewer than 3,000 milligrams of sodium a day.

 

Basically, the report says that consuming anything between 1-1/2 and 3 tsp of salt per day is just fine, and there were adverse effects from eating more than that or less than that.

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thebob

As usual the press did not understand (or possibly even read) the paper that their article was written about.

 

The study...

 

http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=18311&page=R1

 

... is a meta analysis of papers, a study of studies, documenting the effect of sodium on CVD prognosis .

 

The paper summarizes that its inclusion criteria were too wide to come to any meaningful conclusions because the intakes and care modalities were so different from those in the US.

Unusually these days the paper is published to present its null hypothesis, which is a good thing for other researchers, but obviously totally lost on science journalists.

 

the advice from the journalist isn't at all what the CDC says about salt intake, either basically or not.

 

The phrase "Absent from the CDC study was the difference between healthy mineral salts and iodized table salt." is a canard because the study was based on different measurements of excreted sodium.

 

 

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SkyMan

Sounds like it says it doesn't matter how much salt you eat and attempts to reduce it are pointless and then it says

 

 

Basically, the report says that consuming anything between 1-1/2 and 3 tsp of salt per day is just fine, and there were adverse effects from eating more than that or less than that.

which sounds like most people need to reduce it.

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thebob

Sounds like it says it doesn't matter how much salt you eat and attempts to reduce it are pointless and then it says

 

 

which sounds like most people need to reduce it.

 

The quoted article makes no recommendations at all. That recommendation is "cherry picked" from one of the many reports reviewed by the CDC article, that the reporter attributes it to, but isn't part, of the CDC report.

 

This is a fabulous example of how stupidity is spread by ignorant journalists.

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no one

when ever i see any where that this or that is not healthy i give it some time for them to change there minds like they do most of the time 

the way i see it its all up to who is paying for the study 

if it is the sold maker than solt is very healthy 

when it is there competition selling healthy nasty tasting junk solt is than very bad for you 

and on you can go with all the stuff that is not healthy for us 

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thebob

when ever i see any where that this or that is not healthy i give it some time for them to change there minds like they do most of the time 

the way i see it its all up to who is paying for the study 

if it is the sold maker than solt is very healthy 

when it is there competition selling healthy nasty tasting junk solt is than very bad for you 

and on you can go with all the stuff that is not healthy for us 

 

There are some studies that have ulterior motives but they are quickly discovered for what they are. One aspect of a quality scientific paper is that it gets reproduced. Any time you read a paper that is groundbreaking, you should consider it as preliminary.

 

Quality studies rest on the shoulders of well researched and duplicated science.

 

This is actually a very good study, it is the report on the study that is totally misleading.

 

Unfortunately reading academic papers is becoming a lost art. The worlds of science and journalism barely meet. And advertising standards are so low that "pseudo" science is the bread and butter of the nutrition and supplement industry.

 

I think that science is getting a very bad rap because of this kind of reporting.

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Knowdafish

I would be more concerned about the use and consumption of MSG, rather than salt, at least while living in the Philippines. 

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BFHammer

The CDC still attempt to blame high cholesterol for heart attacks despite zero direct evidence.  They also still recommend franken oils like soy and margarine's over coconut and butter.  They still recommend the backward food pyramid.   Plus the dis proven calorie in/out theory and how reducing calories for obesity has a 2% success rate past 12 months.

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