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spritsail

i replied to a thread some time ago on a similiar theme - wood burning brick ovens - and there are some pics there. First I put down a concrete base, about 5 ' x' 5 ft  and walls 4 ft high . The walls were hollow brick and then around 2 ' of concrete. This is used for wood storage. On top I used layer of firebricks. It is lined with  firebricks . The exterior walls are concrete about 3" thick. i use 2" thick mahogany door which is topped with steel plate.

 

As a previous post says it is a learning curve to use it. My wife, being small and a bit afraid of the fire isn't too keen on usng it so much and prefers an eye level electric grill/oven.

 

it wasn't too expensive to build 2 workmen, around 4 days at 300 php at day = 2400 php , 200 firebricks at 4 php = 800 php. Hollow blocks, maybe 50 ?  sand, gravel, bag cement . maybe total cost around 10k . i did it to use up some left over materials, After 4 years its still ok, none of the firebricks have cracked or dislodged, 

 

The web site traditional wood buring brick ovens gives a lot of tips and building ideas.    

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My bamboo house and cottages are still in  good nick after 12 years. Points to remember are   Make sure that the builders are using the right type of bamboo , there is hawaiin (thin walls) and the

It wonderful to see more people discovering the yurt design.. we have thoroughly enjoyed ours! There is no need at all to buy a commercial kit, then to have the expense of a several thousand pound s

Some of the best pizza ovens are built using clay in a dome shape. See Traditional Wood Burning Ovens. The ideal height for the oven should be 16 inches. I used firebricks from Bulua just outside Cdo

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thebob

Where did you get the fire cement/ refractory cement? Do you know how hot it can stand?

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jojogumabew

Where did you get the fire cement/ refractory cement? Do you know how hot it can stand?

In manila, we get it from a company in Caloocan called reliance industries and they specialize in furnace supplies They sell firebrick rated to 1500F for about P35-40 per brick. They also sell ceramic insulating blankets, refractory cement. The ceramic blankets are expensive but allow you to reduce the thickness of the insulation. 

 

I have an IR thermometer that goes to 900F and my oven will exceed that. At 900F, pizza cooks in 1 minute.

 

I have a problem w chimney w some loose bricks. I think I bought wrong kind of refractory cement for that portion (last bag).

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yurtmaster

It wonderful to see more people discovering the yurt design.. we have thoroughly enjoyed ours!


There is no need at all to buy a commercial kit, then to have the expense of a several thousand pound shipment transported to the other side of the planet... the yurt is an amazing simple / rugged and basic design that can be build with local building material and with a very minimum of home building skill set; this was my first attempted, and I supervised 20 farmers whom could barely drive a straight nail!


I had visited several yurt in person in the States and had planned on ordering a kit "some day"...so I had done alot of reading in avdance, cralwed all over these and had a good idea what I was building before starting out...but the design is so straight forward, and as I was saying in many ways actually requires less building skills then constructing a "stick-house", imagine the lattice walls are just screwed together!


Dont get me wrong, the yurt is a very light weight design, and the components can be moved easily (locally) if your building at a remote location, and because of the light weight it can be placed over-looking/sloped ground for example where you could never build a heavy cement house...once the components are made (Door frame, center-ring, lattice and rafters) the actual assembling is very fast, your entire house can be erected in one week time...and in the end you have a VERY cool (as in not hot) and comfortable home compared to building with cement, that is super strong and can be less expensive to build...YOU CAN DO IT!!


The Yurt design is well documented on the internet, I ever found a yurt calculator at one time, this was a computer program online where you just input your basic perimeters such as the building diameter and wall height and the program gives you the bolt spacing and the actually length and count of rafters and latices...this gave me the confidence to build one myself, but shortly into the build I ended up changing the design and just went at it alone.


There are only several critical dimensions and the rest of the structure in surprising forgiving to slight adjustments back and forth: basically all you need is to establish your wall height and diameter, from here the roof should be at 30 degree angle, so this will dictate the length of your rafters, the lattice spacing should be such that the rafters are supported between 12- 18" apart based on the overall diameter of our structure, a larger diameter will need a wider spacing to avoid the rafters being overly crowed where they converge at the center-ring (the tip of the roof)...I started with 10 lattice, and once I had the basic bolt spacing for the wall height, used these as the pattern to make the remaining pieces; working with a nominal of 10 also allows for easy calculations for the overall count of lattice and rafters; the length of the spread of these 10 pieces divided into the the overall diameter you decide.


We decide that since we where building our own yurt that we would go big, and at 40 feet is was WAY larger than any available kits, and having four bedrooms the yurt ended up at 1500 square feet with the loft. Once we had the lattice and rafter in place we used the traditional Filippo building materials to cover the walls...chopped (tadtad) bamboo and screen for the open windows, and Cogon roof.. of course you can make your yurt as simple of as elaborate as you wish based on the amount you want to invest, but even with the most rustic of material our yurt had a resort "feel", rustic yet elegant.   


We built our first yurt on a "traditional" circular elevated wood deck....however one of the biggest innovations on our next built was building on a concrete slab, with several feet of hollow block (cinder block) as the lower part of the wall to raise the lattice off the ground and protect against termites, this proved to be much less expensive than building the wood deck, and the concrete is much more tolerant to having water splashed around (think kids washing dishes) and much more rugged in standing up to an active young family...yet will still remain cool and comfortable in any weather.


Well, not wanting to write a book, I'll end it here...if anyone has any specific question I'm more that happy to share any our experience.

Hope this helps! Sean


The following links are of our build picture on Facebook, if anyone has problems veiwing, please let me know and I could add you to our friends list;

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151558317816593&set=a.10151558311241593.1073741839.722611592&type=1&theater

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151558320191593&set=np.7324286.100004291893046&type=1&theater&notif_t=close_friend_activity

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JasonEcos
 

I'm really interested in seeing the build, but unfortunately I get a "content temporarily unavailable" error from Facebook.... Does the link works for others? Wondering if its me, Facebook, or the link.

 

Thanks for the follow up on the yurt though!

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Paul

 

I'm really interested in seeing the build, but unfortunately I get a "content temporarily unavailable" error from Facebook.... Does the link works for others? Wondering if its me, Facebook, or the link.

 

Thanks for the follow up on the yurt though!

 

It will not work for anyone who is not on his "friends" list. But, there is a way to sort that out.

 

If you are a member of Facebook, click this link, and send him a friend request. When he accepts mine, I will ask him if he can make the gallery for the Yurt, available for public viewing. 

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ok i send request there 

all the yurt i seen is build out of lumber 

how is bamboo going to work for it i dont know 

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JasonEcos

It will not work for anyone who is not on his "friends" list. But, there is a way to sort that out.

 

If you are a member of Facebook, click this link, and send him a friend request. When he accepts mine, I will ask him if he can make the gallery for the Yurt, available for public viewing. 

 

Making a gallery would be superb.  I'm actually considering quitting Facebook all together, so I'm hesitant to start adding people.

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spritsail

thank you 

you answered lot of my questions 

1 of the web sites you pos tit has some sick designs there :)

also can you post some pics of yours 

like to get idea on the structure of it 

Hi . I started the building in 2003, based on a model I made as I am useless at drawing 2d plans. It has a suface area on the ground floor of approx 2000 sq ft and a mezzanine 2 nd floor of 400 sq ft. Altogether 4 bedooms, staff accommodation, 2 kitchens and 2 bathrooms. Wraparound terrace 6 ft wide which is our diining area. Also have three bamboo / hardwood cottages built in a balinese style with a sunken japanese style  jacuzzi/.hottub on the ground floor and bedroom on 2nd floor. 

 

I built the house on 48 concrete supports such that there is a great deal of redundancy so that if one element fails it wil not affect the structual integrity of the house.

 

i have added over the years and probably will build another self contained balinese style cottage but with its own kitchen etc later this year.

post-7590-0-16069900-1374065267_thumb.jpg

post-7590-0-90228900-1374065363_thumb.jpg

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thats taking bahay kubo to a next level 

just missing private airport and a dock lol 

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Paul

Yeah, we are talking about keeping things simple, not building a place like that. Let's keep that post for the "My resort is bigger than yours" thread. 

 

To keep this thread in perspective, the key words in the title are "bahay kubo". Those who do not know what those words mean, may wish to look them up.

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oh no paul

i like his post it shows where and how far you can take it 

for the most part love the hot tub 

like it so much considering paying to much for room just couse of it :)

i will be building mine in mountains so cant tell how far i can take it 

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Knowdafish

 

I'm really interested in seeing the build, but unfortunately I get a "content temporarily unavailable" error from Facebook.... Does the link works for others? Wondering if its me, Facebook, or the link.

 

Thanks for the follow up on the yurt though!

I get this: The page you requested cannot be displayed right now. It may be temporarily unavailable, the link you clicked on may have expired, or you may not have permission to view this page.

 

I think the problem is the last part. I think he gave a solution in that he would have to add you as a friend and is willing to do so if you send him a friend request. 

 

The following links are of our build picture on Facebook, if anyone has problems viewing, please let me know and I could add you to our friends list;

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jojogumabew

Hi Sprit sail

 

Can you please tell me what kind of varnish you use on exposed wood and if you have other suggestions.

 

The house I am building has a lot of exposed wood (even if a lot of it is under a roof, it will get completely soaked during the rainy season).

 

I am treating the wood with glycol/borax/boric acid. But I think it needs varnish or something like that. Anyway, I've seen boiled linseed oil, tung oil finish, used motor oil, exterior polyurethane, spar varnish. But would like something not too expensive and practical.

 

Would appreciate your advice.

 

Thanks!

 

My bamboo house and cottages are still in  good nick after 12 years. Points to remember are

 

Make sure that the builders are using the right type of bamboo , there is hawaiin (thin walls) and the tough building bamboo, Batakan. i have rafters etc of hawaiin and some supports of batakan.

 

make sure that you get the bamboo cut when there is no moon as it reduces Buko beetle infestation.

 

Best you immerse the bamboo in salt  water for a period or in a bath of borax.

 

Use tie wire instead of nails and bolts as bamboo will crack.

 

Always varnish exposed bamboo and try to avoid exposure to rain and sun etc.

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Headed that way

Tung oil finish is excellent but labor intensive.  About as waterproof as you can get.  Most "varnishes" are now polyurethanes and might be cheaper for the first few coats but long term the tung oil finish is going to be cheaper cause it lasts.

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