Jump to content

Recommended Posts

goggleye

Just out of curiousity - how would one know if they are black- listed with the BIA and wouldnt be able to enter the Philippines?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowdafish

By checking with the Philippine Embassy in their home country I would imagine. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

Or, simply contact your nearest Philippine Embassy and attempt to purchase a 9(a) visa. That is what I did in November, 2006, to return, when others insisted that I was black listed. Obviously, I wasn't. 

 

Let me quality my answer. The reason I suggest doing that, rather than going and simply asking if you are black listed from the Philippines, is to not give them anything to start thinking about. Like, "Is this guy a lowlife who we should not allow in to the Philippines?"  They may start thinking negatively about you ahead of time, if you go there direct. Submitting an application for a 9(a) is just as good, and will not cause you any issues. 

Edited by Paul
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

Well, my question is.. How do get black listed?

 

I am sure the list is long. But, here are some examples. Commit a heinous crime. If you (supposedly) become an overstaying alien and get caught before you pay your past due fees and fines, you can be black listed. If you were to call a Filipina a whore in public, they can throw you out of the country. Tons of ways to make that list. Anything that would make you become an "undesirable alien", would do it. 

 

What a lot of people do not realize is, you can also be removed from the list, if you secure a lawyer to help you do so. Well, I would say lesser charged reasons (overstaying, etc.) would have a shot at being removed from the list. Criminals would not be removed from the list, I would think.

Edited by Paul
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
tobster

The longer I live here I have come to realise that it is easier to get thrown out of the country than it is to stay in it...............

Link to post
Share on other sites
ThomsonJr

From what I have experienced, when a Filipino tells you they will get you out of their country and black list you (which I have been told before), just ignore them and don't talk with them anymore, it might be true or it might be total bullshit but it's not worth it. I have now realized it's better to avoid any kind of negative confrontations in the Philippines.



 If you are truely blacklisted then you should know. It seems to me that they should first arrest you etc.

Edited by ThomsonJr
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

it's better to avoid any kind of negative confrontations in the Philippines.

 

Now...THAT is truly good advice. Be friendly, Be polite. Mind your own business. Don't stir the shit. Don't do really stupid things that are likely to offend somebody.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
CebuKano

Also the airlines that fly into the Philippines (or any other country) from foreign countries are supplied with the blacklist as well. If there is any question if you are on the list they will clarify it before you are allowed a boarding pass. It is the airline's responsibility to fly an "unwanted or undocumented" passenger out of the country that rejects them so it is in their best interest to keep up to date.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Buko Beach

One good way to get black listed is to get involved in local politics, either by promoting, supporting, or openly campaigning for a candidate.

 

Go to a few city council meetings and ask questions about the lack of progress on local projects or where the money is going and that might do it. Easier to remove the thorn instead of fixing the problems.

 

As foreign nationals we can't vote so no need to stick your neck out and risk being black listed or end up dead.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul

Oh yeah. For sure. Pick up a political picket sign. Or, openly campaign for a candidate, ANY candidate. That will do it for you, for sure. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
udonthani

on another forum one guy, who had never been to the Philippines before, related that when he applied for a visa in his home country, he decided to be honest and listed his criminal convictions in full on the form. Now in his forties, he'd served a couple of quite short prison sentences in his late teens and early twenties - over twenty years before. He was mortified when his visa was refused and called them up. He said to them can I just come and get the 21 visa exempt on arrival. They said no you can't, we know you now. Not sure how it played out for him, but I would imagine that people that disclose criminal convictions on visa applications and especially if they have served prison sentences, could stand the risk of being blacklisted, before they ever even visit. That goes for people visiting the United States as well and probably quite a few other countries. People who have gone to jail supposedly cannot get in though I would guess that plenty do.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...