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Tourist Visa for Your Wife to Visit the US


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mpt1947

I had an opportunity to speak with John Domingo (US Consular in Cebu) today, June 10, 2013.  We got to talking about what we needed to do to secure a Tourist Visa for my wife to visit the US.

 

He said that one thing that would just about guarantee getting such a Visa, is if the American husband obtain Permeant  Residency Status in the Philippines first.  The State Department looks at that status for the husband and figures that he has no intention of returning the US for an extended period of time, and thus is more willing to grant a tourist visa to his wife.

 

Something to keep in mind, if all you want to do is bring your wife back for a visit.

 

We also touched on the Police Reports - he recommends getting a Report from the FBI, since they have a better working relationship with the NBI - most local communities would be sending their reports to the nearest Philippine Consular Office in the States, which will add several months wait time to the process.

 

 

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The chances of a Filipina married to an American citizen getting a tourist visa to the US are extremely low. That isn't to say it is impossible (we have three members on the forums whose wives got tho

I have said it before, and I'm sure I will say it again. John has nothing to do with the visa process, and regularly gives incorrect information. There are many on this forum alone with permanent resi

The B1/B2 tourist/business visa is multiple entry and good for 10 years.  Which is a bit odd as an approved spousal visa is only good for 6 months.     The problem is that quite often the women ar

shadow

I have said it before, and I'm sure I will say it again. John has nothing to do with the visa process, and regularly gives incorrect information. There are many on this forum alone with permanent residency status whose wife has applied for tourist visa and been flatly denied. Having a US citizen husband makes it look to the interviewing consul that they are trying to circumvent the I-130 process.

 

"He said that one thing that would just about guarantee getting such a Visa, is if the American husband obtain Permeant  Residency Status in the Philippines first."

 

This information is hogwash.

 

if they have considerable money invested in the Philippines (home, businesses, etc.) and the US citizen has been in the Philippines for a number of years, the odds go up, but the resident visa by itself means absolutely nothing.

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Headshot

The chances of a Filipina married to an American citizen getting a tourist visa to the US are extremely low. That isn't to say it is impossible (we have three members on the forums whose wives got those visas), but it takes a lot more than a 13A visa to guarantee getting a visa. That may be a consideration, but only if they take the time to consider it. I had a 13A when we applied for a tourist visa...denied. They didn't even look at it. They hardly even asked her any questions except her name before they filled out the denial form. After my wife got denied on the tourist visa, we applied for a spousal visa and she was approved. We went on vacation to the US and returned to the Philippines. She voluntarily surrendered her green card. Those whose wives were granted visas all wrote cover letters that were submitted with the paperwork...at every step of the way. The cover letter needs to tell the consular officer exactly why you are going to the US and when you plan to return. It also needs to show why she should be given the visa. 13A visas are good to have, but it isn't as if you couldn't walk away from it if the two of you decided to stay in the US. The consular officer knows that. You will probably have to show a lot more evidence than that if you expect them to believe you are returning to the Philippines. Owning a home, having a job, owning a business, prior travel to the US, length of marriage are all good things to have, but there is no magic formula or guarantee for getting a tourist visa.

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USMC-Retired

From everything I read and the letter to my Senator:

 

Her monetary wealth and potential must be greater then yours and compelling enough to ensure her return. If your potential income and assets in the US are greater this makes it hard if not impossible.

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David Kennedy

A guy in Dgte just got one for his wife; 10 year mulitple entry. But he had to apply twice and I think he said their bank account here was looked at by US immigration

 

I don't think they have been married very long, and I don't think she has any connected relations in town

 

They are headed to Texas

 

 

Edit: Thinking about it...they don't give 10 yr tourist visas do they? Must have been spousal

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mpt1947

Please don't kill the messenger - just passing on information he gave me -

 

I am sure there are a lot of factors that go into determining who does and who doesn't get visas - it is my understanding that if my wife can show she has strong ties to the Philippines (family, businesses, investments etc.) that helps as well.

 

John kept referring to a B1-B2 Visa - I don't know what that is - since we still aren't ready to apply yet anyway.

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mpt1947

From everything I read and the letter to my Senator:

 

Her monetary wealth and potential must be greater then yours and compelling enough to ensure her return. If your potential income and assets in the US are greater this makes it hard if not impossible.

yes, my wife has greater assets then I do - I just have my bank account in the US - my wife owns her own home and the lot it is on here in the Philippines.  She has several businesses, elderly parents, children - 

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shadow

Please don't kill the messenger - just passing on information he gave me -

 

I am sure there are a lot of factors that go into determining who does and who doesn't get visas - it is my understanding that if my wife can show she has strong ties to the Philippines (family, businesses, investments etc.) that helps as well.

 

John kept referring to a B1-B2 Visa - I don't know what that is - since we still aren't ready to apply yet anyway.

B1/B2 is the tourist/business visa.

 

Your wife's AGE is often the biggest determining factor. The older the better.

 

yes, my wife has greater assets then I do - I just have my bank account in the US - my wife owns her own home and the lot it is on here in the Philippines.  She has several businesses, elderly parents, children - 

If she is over 40 and you have a 13A, your chances of an approval are good if she presents her case well.

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mpt1947

The chances of a Filipina married to an American citizen getting a tourist visa to the US are extremely low. That isn't to say it is impossible (we have three members on the forums whose wives got those visas), but it takes a lot more than a 13A visa to guarantee getting a visa. That may be a consideration, but only if they take the time to consider it. I had a 13A when we applied for a tourist visa...denied. They didn't even look at it. They hardly even asked her any questions except her name before they filled out the denial form. After my wife got denied on the tourist visa, we applied for a spousal visa and she was approved. We went on vacation to the US and returned to the Philippines. She voluntarily surrendered her green card. Those whose wives were granted visas all wrote cover letters that were submitted with the paperwork...at every step of the way. The cover letter needs to tell the consular officer exactly why you are going to the US and when you plan to return. It also needs to show why she should be given the visa. 13A visas are good to have, but it isn't as if you couldn't walk away from it if the two of you decided to stay in the US. The consular officer knows that. You will probably have to show a lot more evidence than that if you expect them to believe you are returning to the Philippines. Owning a home, having a job, owning a business, prior travel to the US, length of marriage are all good things to have, but there is no magic formula or guarantee for getting a tourist visa.

Yes Headshot, again I am just passing on what I heard - I make no guarantees on what anyone tells me - even you  :)

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Headshot

Yes Headshot, again I am just passing on what I heard - I make no guarantees on what anyone tells me - even you   :)

 

Well, let's hope you become number four to be successful. Just make sure ALL of your ducks are in a row BEFORE she goes in. I'm hoping I'm number five. John told us our case was almost guaranteed success too since my wife had a green card and voluntarily surrendered it, which is evidence she doesn't intend to stay. . We'll see when we apply again later this year. Whether you are successful or not, I hope that you will share your wife's experience with us. One of the strengths of LinC Forums is that we can learn from one another's experiences.

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SkyMan

Edit: Thinking about it...they don't give 10 yr tourist visas do they? Must have been spousal

The B1/B2 tourist/business visa is multiple entry and good for 10 years.  Which is a bit odd as an approved spousal visa is only good for 6 months.

 

 

If she is over 40 and you have a 13A, your chances of an approval are good if she presents her case well.

The problem is that quite often the women are never asked to present their case and so the interview ends (denied) before they know it started.  They're asked a few, small talkish questions and boom.  The application doesn't ask what assets you have in the RP and the interviewer doesn't ask what ties there are or any of the things they're supposed to be basing their decision on.  Since husbands aren't allowed in to the interview, the best way for her (him) to present a case is to have a cover letter on top of the application explaining the reason for the trip and your future plans in the RP, your 13A, your house/land, etc. 

Edited by SkyMan
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shadow

The B1/B2 tourist/business visa is multiple entry and good for 10 years.  Which is a bit odd as an approved spousal visa is only good for 6 months.

Not quite correct. B1/B2 are often  2 or 5 years, and sometimes 10 years. The actual length of stay allowable is a maximum of 6 months and determined by the agent at POE.

The problem is that quite often the women are never asked to present their case and so the interview ends (denied) before they know it started.  They're asked a few, small talkish questions and boom.  The application doesn't ask what assets you have in the RP and the interviewer doesn't ask what ties there are or any of the things they're supposed to be basing their decision on.  Since husbands aren't allowed in to the interview, the best way for her (him) to present a case is to have a cover letter on top of the application explaining the reason for the trip and your future plans in the RP, your 13A, your house/land, etc. 

Yes, and be well prepared to present her case. If she allows the interviewer to ask a one or two questions and deny her, that is what usually will happen. The girl must be assertive and get that interviewer to LOOK at what she has.  

 

Well, let's hope you become number four to be successful. Just make sure ALL of your ducks are in a row BEFORE she goes in. I'm hoping I'm number five. John told us our case was almost guaranteed success too since my wife had a green card and voluntarily surrendered it, which is evidence she doesn't intend to stay. . We'll see when we apply again later this year. Whether you are successful or not, I hope that you will share your wife's experience with us. One of the strengths of LinC Forums is that we can learn from one another's experiences.

 

 

MPT's wife has a very good chance, based on her age and her assets.

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mpt1947

What I would like, is some kind of multi entry, over a period of time - if I have to go back to the States for medical treatment (VA), if I have to be admitted to a hospital, I want my wife by my side - I have family and friends on the West Coast from Northern California to LA and on into Arizona - don't worry Smokey, not you.  But like I said we have other fish to fry before we get to stage 

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Headed that way

I've not looked into what it takes to get a girl back to the state as that really isn't my plan for the Philippines but I am surprised that a spouse of an American citizen has this much trouble visiting the U.S.

 

That is messed up.  Just fly her to Larado and run across the border like the untold millions have already.  : )

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Bill H

I've not looked into what it takes to get a girl back to the state as that really isn't my plan for the Philippines but I am surprised that a spouse of an American citizen has this much trouble visiting the U.S.

 

That is messed up.  Just fly her to Larado and run across the border like the untold millions have already.  : )

 

yes it is, particularly when millions of Mexicans walk across the boarder every year without any paperwork at all.  Our government has a case of permanent head up it's ass for sure.  I am regularly embarrassed by the actions of my government.  It didn't used to be that way, but it sure is now.

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