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Renting motorcycles -pitfalls and dangers


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OzGuy43

ive had a ninja250 for awhile now in cebu and its a great bike, plenty of power to get yourself out of trouble but small enough to navigate easily through traffic. 

when renting bikes in phili always take plenty of photos of it and include a pic of the rental guy if you can, never leave your passport with them as they will always accept a copy, although some will have a whinge, they will still agree. 

 

we travelled from one end of vietnam to the other and every single hotel wanted my passport, not once did they get it but had a few good blues with the managers along the way. nobody has the right to hold your passport.

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Probably 90% of resorts in the Visayas rent out motorcycles, and to my knowledge there are few problems, however, just a few warnings to note. My wife has been renting out motorcycles and jeeps to o

Good OP.   I have to say that the quality of bike rentals in Camiguin was amongst the best in the Visayas - but the price did reflect this.  Personally, I always pay the extra for good tyres and mir

it's actually more like 1%, or maybe 5%. You are doing it, but not all that many other resort owners are. The Philippines is not like Thailand where yes, it is common for resorts and guesthouses, even

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johnboy999

 

I'd really like a Rouser220 or CBR150 (or really a ninja250) but can't really justify spending that much and probably not the best bikes to learn a clutch with.

 

My first bike was a Rouser 220 and I found it easy to learn to use the clutch on it. Mind you, now I have a Ninja 650 and the quality is so much better (the price is much higher though!) but the Rouser was a good stepping stone on the way

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A_Simple_Man

 

80% of a motorcycles stopping power comes from the front brake best to just learn how to use it properly.

 

Not so.

 

I had a cheap Honda Wave for years and the rear brake was applied by way of a foot lever and not a hand lever.  I almost never had to use the front brakes.  Its these darn automatic scooters that started the hand lever idea.  I will go back to a foot brake.

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Ronin

The SZ16 is an option, I googled it a few times when I first saw it (its fairly new here I think) and saw a couple reviews of it in India, one of the biggest complaints was weak brakes.

 

There are two versions here that are similar...

 

The FZ16

http://www.yamaha-motor.com.ph/product/fz16/index.html

 

The SV16  (this was called the SZ-R when I was in the showroom a few months ago)

http://www.yamaha-motor.com.ph/product/sz16/sz16.html

 

IIRC the SV is about 70k and the FZ16 is 107k.

 

I bought a new FZ16 for 107k in Mandaue.

 

Off the top of my head, the FZ has a little more HP/Torque, a mono-shock and digital instruments.

 

The brakes and handling of the FZ16 are excellent.  I've never felt the need for stronger brakes but I tend to not use my back brake alone unless it's trailing braking.  The FZ16 cruises nicely at 80kph and the fastest I've had it is 102 (that's with two people and it took awhile).  It's a good bike for the city as it's very easy to maneuver thru traffic.  My girlfriend finds it comfortable to ride (she's about 45kg).

 

From my research the Honda CBR 150 may be faster and have more HP but comes on at higher rpms.  The FZ's power comes on at lower rpms thus it is probably better suited to city traffic.  Oh yea, the CBR is fuel injected (better) but it's price is 150k.

 

I've ridden a YBR 125 quite a bit here.  It's a good all around bike but I enjoy the FZ's handling and pickup much more.

 

We also rented an XR200 to see if it was a good choice.  Although I enjoyed it, the seat was so uncomfortable that I quickly crossed it off my list.

 

I crossed the Rouser off because of many complaints of it being unreliable YMMV.

 

I'll probably end up selling my FZ16 and buying a Honda CBR 250 at some point.  That seems like a great bike for around here but the price is 250k.

Edited by Ronin
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Ronin

Not so.

 

I had a cheap Honda Wave for years and the rear brake was applied by way of a foot lever and not a hand lever.  I almost never had to use the front brakes.  Its these darn automatic scooters that started the hand lever idea.  I will go back to a foot brake.

 

I've heard that it's 70%.  This is because whenever you brake, weight is transferred to the front tire, more weight=greater braking power.

 

70% or 80%, it's universally accepted that the front brake provides the majority of stopping power.

 

You can use your front brake on gravel or other low traction situations, you have to be perfectly upright (not in a corner) and you have to pump it when the front wheel starts to slide.

 

For quick stops it's best to use a combination of front and rear, but mostly front.

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udonthani

when renting bikes in phili always take plenty of photos of it and include a pic of the rental guy if you can, never leave your passport with them as they will always accept a copy, although some will have a whinge, they will still agree. 

I wouldn't say the making a big deal of taking photos thing is necessary in the Philippines at all. I've heard anecdotal accounts that once in a while, some kind of scam/fiddle can take place but I have never seen any sign of it myself. In the very touristy parts oif southern Thailand like Ko Lipe, there are regular reports of hirers trying to make out that a scratched panel that was scratched anyway when the renter collected the bike. Lots. But the Thailand jet ski and bike rental scams are a totally different planet than what happens in the Philippines. Nothing like that in any place in the Philippines I have ever seen and in fact even in Thailand I have never had any funny stuff happen to me there re bike rental. I have never left a passport either, in either Thailand or the Philippines. In fact no Filipino hirer has ever even asked me for one. The only bike hirers in the Philippines that want a passport are the foreigner ones, not that having a passport can stop a renter from doing a runner if they crash and write off a bike. Anybody can just go to their embassy and get emergency travel docs home any time they want..

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shadow

There are two versions here that are similar...

 

The FZ16

http://www.yamaha-motor.com.ph/product/fz16/index.html

 

The SV16  (this was called the SZ-R when I was in the showroom a few months ago)

http://www.yamaha-motor.com.ph/product/sz16/sz16.html

 

IIRC the SV is about 70k and the FZ16 is 107k.

 

I bought a new FZ16 for 107k in Mandaue.

 

Off the top of my head, the FZ has a little more HP/Torque, a mono-shock and digital instruments.

 

The brakes and handling of the FZ16 are excellent.  I've never felt the need for stronger brakes but I tend to not use my back brake alone unless it's trailing braking.  The FZ16 cruises nicely at 80kph and the fastest I've had it is 102 (that's with two people and it took awhile).  It's a good bike for the city as it's very easy to maneuver thru traffic.  My girlfriend finds it comfortable to ride (she's about 45kg).

 

From my research the Honda CBR 150 may be faster and have more HP but comes on at higher rpms.  The FZ's power comes on at lower rpms thus it is probably better suited to city traffic.  Oh yea, the CBR is fuel injected (better) but it's price is 150k.

 

I've ridden a YBR 125 quite a bit here.  It's a good all around bike but I enjoy the FZ's handling and pickup much more.

 

We also rented an XR200 to see if it was a good choice.  Although I enjoyed it, the seat was so uncomfortable that I quickly crossed it off my list.

 

I crossed the Rouser off because of many complaints of it being unreliable YMMV.

 

I'll probably end up selling my FZ16 and buying a Honda CBR 250 at some point.  That seems like a great bike for around here but the price is 250k.

I hadn't noticed the SZ did not have monoshock.

 

The engine appears to be the same, I wonder why the SZ is rated higher HP/torque than the FZ? Maybe it's just sales pitch.

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shadow

I've heard that it's 70%.  This is because whenever you brake, weight is transferred to the front tire, more weight=greater braking power.

 

70% or 80%, it's universally accepted that the front brake provides the majority of stopping power.

 

You can use your front brake on gravel or other low traction situations, you have to be perfectly upright (not in a corner) and you have to pump it when the front wheel starts to slide.

 

For quick stops it's best to use a combination of front and rear, but mostly front.

I used to take people on bike tours around the mountains here quite often. After several newbies to motorcycles crashed behind me, I started to instruct them NOT to use the front brake. An inexperienced rider on gravel will go down just about every time they grab onto that front brake in any kind of situation. If they get used to using it, their first reaction is to panic and grab that front brake, and down they go. 

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Canuck Joe

I've heard that it's 70%. This is because whenever you brake, weight is transferred to the front tire, more weight=greater braking power.

 

70% or 80%, it's universally accepted that the front brake provides the majority of stopping power.

 

You can use your front brake on gravel or other low traction situations, you have to be perfectly upright (not in a corner) and you have to pump it when the front wheel starts to slide.

 

For quick stops it's best to use a combination of front and rear, but mostly front

yup that was the point I was trying to pass on, well explained.

When feeling traction loss in front tire while braking, modulating the pressure (threshold braking) can maintain the control while still braking. Lots of practice can make make all the difference.

 

http://www.motorcycle.com/rider-safety/knowing-how-to-brake-saves-the-most-lives-88119.html

 

Threshold braking has been almost made obsolete by ABS but rare for motorcycles

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threshold_braking

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A_Simple_Man

I started to instruct them NOT to use the front brake.

 

I been riding since I was 18 and ALL my spills (maybe a dozen or more over the years, I don't learn easy) were somehow related to using the front brake and front wheel locking up on gravel, snow (cain't fix stupid 'n I'm from Canada eh) wet grass etc.  I ain't saying I'm an expert, just that the front brake sucks for me.  Although I do say that when I have to stop fast I use both brakes full on.

 

Edit, thanks all for trying to teach me about riding bikes but if I ain't learned by now you'se talking to a post.  All I was doing here was relating my personal experiences and not lookin' fer no n lectures. . . Ride on guys.

Edited by A_Simple_Man
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thebob

A weak back brake is usually bad maintenance or assembly. The cable and the brake arm should be at 90 degrees to each other for optimum braking. Often when spacers are lost in the vulcanizers the brake arm is rotated on the spline and the cable adjusted to suit. That can really effect efficiency. The brake arm pivot can also partially seize in the brake plate, or the linings are contaminated or glazed. 

 

The Mio does have a ridiculously long back brake cable, and it is very prone to seizing especially on often washed, barely lubed bikes.

 

There is nothing wrong with well maintained drum brakes.

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Ronin

I hadn't noticed the SZ did not have monoshock.

 

The engine appears to be the same, I wonder why the SZ is rated higher HP/torque than the FZ? Maybe it's just sales pitch.

 

You might be right about that.

 

I have read that the SZ-R is detuned for better gas mileage.

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shadow

You might be right about that.

 

I have read that the SZ-R is detuned for better gas mileage.

Ok, then if it is "detuned", why is it rated higher in HP and torque? Sounds like some pretty good "detuning"!

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Ronin

Ok, then if it is "detuned", why is it rated higher in HP and torque? Sounds like some pretty good "detuning"!

The Fz16 is higher in hp.

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shadow

The Fz16 is higher in hp.

Right you are, somehow I got them turned around...

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