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Electric Power: 220V vs. 110V


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No. I realize I pay per Kilowatt Hour. What I am saying here is, if you have power fed into your home, and that power is 110vac on each leg, you do not always draw the same current from each leg (side), as that would be almost impossible to do. However, proper electricians should try to wire your home where each side is as balanced as possible.

 

If ALL electrical appliances and devices in our homes were 220vac, and the home were fed by two 110vac legs, then the draw would always be equal, through the meter.

 

See what I mean, now?

 

I saw what you meant before. Balanced load means nothing. You pay for the power (watts) you use...not on what your circuits are capable of. If the wheel in your meter is spinning, it is because there are watts being consumed. Provided that the total number of watts used is equal, it makes no difference whether all of the power flows through one leg or is evenly spread between two. Trust me on this one Paul. You are thinking your meter spins just as fast with just one leg drawing power as if both legs were drawing that same amount of power. That is incorrect. If one leg draws 100 watts in an hour and the other leg draws 1000 watts in that hour, I will be paying for 1100 watt-hours of power (it is additive). It isn't acting like both legs are drawing the same if they aren't. Does that make sense to you? There is really no difference in power used to accomplish a task based on the voltage in the system.

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That sounds like nonsense. A brownout is a brownout. The conversion between 220v and 110v is likely done inside each house.   Also, there should be no significant difference with regards to costs, o

220-240 VAC appliances, conductors and supply lines are far better than 110-120 VAC. For a start the transmission resistance is halved with 220-240 VAC and there is similarly less stress on components

Personally I think if you plan to live here long time it's better to leave the 110V stuff in the U.S.  If you go to 110 you will need a transformer, on a pole, big enough to handle the load/ Eventuall

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Tomaw, your electric bill will be close to the same regardless of your house voltage. You buy watts, which is volts times amps. Whatever it is that you are powering will take the same watts to perform the same function. 220 volts is twice as high as 110 volts, but takes half the amps to do the same task. The higher the voltage, the lower the amperage...but the wattage remains the same.

 

If you will be building a home here, a much more important factor is having a driven ground rod with all circuits in the house connected to it (through the breaker panel). You should run a ground wire to every light fixture and every outlet. Running grounds inside of homes is NOT a common practice here. Without it, you have absolutely no protection from power surges in the line. With a ground, you can use surge protector cords to protect electronics. Without a ground, these devices are worthless. When you look at a 110 volt outlet in the US, you will see two slots and a hole for each outlet. That hole below the slots is the ground connection. Here, the 220 volt outlets look the same, but there is no ground connection. Outlets and home wiring that you buy in the US can be used on either 110 or 220 volt systems. They are actually tested for 600 volts. While you can find grounded outlets in the Philippines, they are uncommon (because they are seldom used), and they are cheaply made.

 

So...before you come here to build, make sure you get enough grounded outlets to do you house and send them so they will be here. Then, make sure your contractor (or electrician) is comfortable, and has experience, with installing grounded systems. Otherwise, you will get the typical substandard Philippines house wiring with no grounding.

I was reading through some post as I am researching some power issues and I came across this posting. A "grounding" does not protect you from power surge, it does protect you from power shock. Note that the neutral ( or "grounded") wire is attached to the grounding, so there can be protection even with 2 wires, but it has to be wired correctly and the right polarity has to be observed). Only a breaker will protect you from a power surge ( but I would not count on it..).

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What area are we talking about

 

Cebu ?

2 systems are used on Cebu Island

 

VECO area use 2 split phase no neutral, center point of pole transformer grounded

CEBECO 1, 2 and 3  uses phase and neutral, neutral grounded at pole transformer

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JSL-USMC

Personally I think if you plan to live here long time it's better to leave the 110V stuff in the U.S.  If you go to 110 you will need a transformer, on a pole, big enough to handle the load/ Eventually you'll change to 220 anyway. I have a few 110 V things..kitchen gadgets mostly, and bought a 3000 watt transformer for the kitchen. I had a couple things changed to 220.

Another thing I learned is to take a big Magic Marker and write the voltage on everything in a conspicuous spot.

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What area are we talking about

Cebu ? 2 systems are used on cebu island

 

VECO area use 2 split phase no neutral, center point of pole transformer grounded

CEBECO 1, 2 and 3  uses phase and neutral, neutral grounded at pole transformer

 

For those living further north: MERALCO does the same as VECO.

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thebob

 

 

Another thing I learned is to take a big Magic Marker and write the voltage on everything in a conspicuous spot.

 

I have some 100V stuff that I have brought from Japan. For safety I have changed the plugs to Australian "sloped 3 prong" plugs and use the same styled outlets for 110V. If you can't physically plug the 100V stuff into 230V, then less accidents occur.

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What area are we talking about

 

Cebu ?

2 systems are used on Cebu Island

 

VECO area use 2 split phase no neutral, center point of pole transformer grounded

CEBECO 1, 2 and 3  uses phase and neutral, neutral grounded at pole transformer

I do not understand 2 split phase? Either it is split phase or it is single phase, never heard of 2 split phase. If Veco is using split phase (what I confirmed after measuring - each phase I measured has 117 volts), you will have 3 wires from the pole to your house, 2 hot (120v) wires and neutral (which is grounded). One of the wires will be bridged to the grounded neutral (wich is grounded at the pole, but you can provide addtitional grounding yourself.

This was the reason I said that any grounding does not protect from power surge - a grounding will not stop it.

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SkyMan

you will have 3 wires from the pole to your house, 2 hot (120v) wires and neutral (which is grounded).

No, you just get the 2 hots. No ground.
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No, you just get the 2 hots. No ground.

No way. I do not want to lecture you, but go outside your house and count the cables that get into yourbhouse to the main panel (I am not talking about the wiring throughout thebhouse, as here in the Philippines they will only wire the 2 to the outlets). Count the cables at the weather heads that goes into your house and I am 99.999% sure you will have 3 wires. If you have only to then you would have 240 single phase. You will see that one cable is insulated ( the hot one at 240) and one which is not insulated, the neutral. This would mean you have not a split phase. You can even touch the neutral - this is common in the province and you cannot have 120/240 only 240.

 

Best is you measure each sinlge phase on its own., the volt meter will tell you

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Now who is lecturing who ?

 

2 insulated wires goes to my house, nothing more

 

When it gets light tomorrow I will take a picture of the wires going to my house

 

Here is wire diagram for pole transformers

 

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Didn't do me any good labeling 110 and  220,my inlaws managed to fry blender,juicer,and battery charger lol

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Yes that is correct. The diagram shows 3 wires. Same as in NA. In NA they run your neutral (grounded) wire throughout the house, in the PI they will run it (or should) to your house. If you are with Veco try to measure a single hot wire and you will get 120 Volts on each. Cebevo on the other hand will measure 240 and 0, exactly as I stated.

 

If they run only the 2 hot wires to your house... Though luck, it makes not such big difference, but normally they would ground your main panel. They also bind 2 cables together, so check also your main panel, there you will see it for sure. Two cables should go to the bus bar and the third is attached to the neutral bar.

 

But as stated measure your wire voltages separately.

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Top diagram?, VECO area, I see only 2 wires going to the house

 

My house has a ground rod, I specially requested it, all my outlets have

ground

 

Just measured,   both sides have 125 volt to ground  (yes it is a bit high)

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Here is a picture of the 2 insulated wires coming into my house

 

 

post-6705-0-69031100-1389457907_thumb.jpg

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Top diagram?, VECO area, I see only 2 wires going to the house

 

My house has a ground rod, I specially requested it, all my outlets have

ground

 

Just measured,   both sides have 125 volt to ground  (yes it is a bit high)

No there are 3 wires on the diagram (right side). They just do not run the nuetral wire to the house (in your case - I run the neutral all the way to my main panel - grounded). On the left side (transformer) you have 2 wires, one hot and one neutral (grounded), while on the right side you have 3 wires, 2 hot and 1 neutral, same ad US ( just in US they run it to the house and outlets - I just run it to the house).

 

However, as said before, they might have 2 wires in one of your cable, you have to check the main panel, if you have the third (neutral) attached to the neutral bus.

 

So your outlet have a ground? The ground rod is installed in every installation, mostly they do it by the pole, but you can add an additional one by the house yourself ( and make sure your fittings are bonded as well)

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