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tomaw

Electric Power: 220V vs. 110V

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tomaw

When I build a house in or near Cebu I'll probably be shipping a number of appliances and electronics from The U.S. While manny if not all these things can be ordered in 220V it might be better to keep them in 110V. I can't find it now but on a recent thread someone mentioned brownouts could be related to the electric power being in 220V. Does this mean brownouts would be less likely to occur if the house electricity is in 110V instead of 220V? What other advantages/ disadvantages are there to each including cost of electric bill? Will one or the other work better with solar pannels?

Edited by tomaw

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smokey

to high tech for me to ans... but i have 110 stuff and have for almost 9 years and its still running except for a dyson vacuum that was NEVER emptied and just smoked and dies due to never emptying the canister. 

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KennyF

A lot of electronic suff like TV sets, DVD players, cell phone chargers etc are 110~220 so will work without problem whatever you do.

 

Very many of the homes in Angeles are set up with dual power. All power sockets are dual, one being 120 and the other 220.

There must be something on line to explain how they did it.

 

KonGC

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Sven

I can't find it now but on a recent thread someone mentioned brownouts could be related to the electric power being in 220V. Does this mean brownouts would be less likely to occur if the house electricity is in 110V instead of 220V? What other advantages/ disadvantages are there to each including cost of electric bill? Will one or the other work better with solar pannels?

That sounds like nonsense. A brownout is a brownout. The conversion between 220v and 110v is likely done inside each house.

 

Also, there should be no significant difference with regards to costs, or the potential for solar energy.

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SkyMan

 

Does this mean brownouts would be less likely to occur if the house electricity is in 110V instead of 220V?

Brownouts occur because the power company is no longer able to produce sufficient power for the high power transmission lines.  This has nothing to do with what voltage that high power is stepped down to. 

Will one or the other work better with solar pannels?

Solar panels work on DC. 

Very many of the homes in Angeles are set up with dual power. All power sockets are dual, one being 120 and the other 220. There must be something on line to explain how they did it.

Guessing here but I imagine those are the former Clark A/B houses.  The USAF would have put extra transformers on the poles to step the power down to 110 and supply both 110/220 to the houses there so occupants could use the appliances brought from home as well as those purchased locally.

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smokey

easy to run both 110/220 if your building the house and do put in more then the usual 1 plug per room ... you can also if building add hot water to all points very easy and then buy one water heater and forget all the point type heaters ... and clean your dishes in hot water 

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tomaw

 

easy to run both 110/220 if your building the house and do put in more then the usual 1 plug per room ... you can also if building add hot water to all points very easy and then buy one water heater and forget all the point type heaters ... and clean your dishes in hot water

..... Thanks Smokey. Good to hear from someone that's actualy done it.

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scavenger7

I brought over a DVD player for my father in law. It worked great till the first brown out after which it never worked again. Turns out I never set the little switch on the back from 110 to 220 and the power surge when the power came back on fried it.

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miles-high

My new condo (in Luzon hehe ;)) has both 110/220V wall jacks, they were there from the beginning, nothing mentioned, nothing requested…

 

The voltage clearly marked, 110 has regular US-type 2-pin, 220 3-pin jacks.


Works great with a 110 DECT phone and a grey market 3DS LL (Nintendo)…

 

:)

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Woolf

In USA you have 110/120  and 220/240  so I guess that in the areas in the philippines also have both

it is done the same way as in usa.

 

Tomaw do you know where what town/city you will build your house?

Edited by Woolf
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Ozepete

220-240 VAC appliances, conductors and supply lines are far better than 110-120 VAC. For a start the transmission resistance is halved with 220-240 VAC and there is similarly less stress on components.  A 1000 watt appliance draws a little over 4 amperes on 240 VAC while a similar 1000 watt appliance draws over 8 on 120 VAC.  The best option is 220-240 VAC. IMO

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Headshot

Tomaw, your electric bill will be close to the same regardless of your house voltage. You buy watts, which is volts times amps. Whatever it is that you are powering will take the same watts to perform the same function. 220 volts is twice as high as 110 volts, but takes half the amps to do the same task. The higher the voltage, the lower the amperage...but the wattage remains the same.

 

If you will be building a home here, a much more important factor is having a driven ground rod with all circuits in the house connected to it (through the breaker panel). You should run a ground wire to every light fixture and every outlet. Running grounds inside of homes is NOT a common practice here. Without it, you have absolutely no protection from power surges in the line. With a ground, you can use surge protector cords to protect electronics. Without a ground, these devices are worthless. When you look at a 110 volt outlet in the US, you will see two slots and a hole for each outlet. That hole below the slots is the ground connection. Here, the 220 volt outlets look the same, but there is no ground connection. Outlets and home wiring that you buy in the US can be used on either 110 or 220 volt systems. They are actually tested for 600 volts. While you can find grounded outlets in the Philippines, they are uncommon (because they are seldom used), and they are cheaply made.

 

So...before you come here to build, make sure you get enough grounded outlets to do you house and send them so they will be here. Then, make sure your contractor (or electrician) is comfortable, and has experience, with installing grounded systems. Otherwise, you will get the typical substandard Philippines house wiring with no grounding.

Edited by Headshot
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Paul

I believe this is similar in the Philippines as it is in the US, depending on line voltage?


Although we have two 110vac legs coming into a home in the US, thereby to feed both 110vac and 220vac appliances, the meter is going to spin in accordance to the heaviest drawing side. So, we are not getting 100% of the power we actually pay for.

 

So, for me anyway, I wish all appliances, lights, etc., were set on 220vac.

Edited by Paul

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Headshot

I believe this is similar in the Philippines as it is in the US, depending on line voltage?

 

Although we have two 110vac legs coming into a home in the US, thereby to feed both 110vac and 220vac appliances, the meter is going to spin in accordance to the heaviest drawing side. So, we are not getting 100% of the power we actually pay for.

 

So, for me anyway, I wish all appliances, lights, etc., were set on 220vac.

 

:ROFLMAO:  :ROFLMAO:  :ROFLMAO:

 

Sorry Paul...that isn't how it works. You are paying for watt hours (watts are how power is measured)...or in other words, you are paying for the power used...regardless of the voltage. 220v doesn't save you anything over 110v.You get 100% of the power you pay for either way. It IS unfortunate that electricity is twice as expensive here (per watt hour) than it is in the US.

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Paul

:ROFLMAO:  :ROFLMAO:  :ROFLMAO:

 

Sorry Paul...that isn't how it works. You are paying for watt hours (watts are how power is measured)...or in other words, you are paying for the power used...regardless of the voltage. 220v doesn't save you anything over 110v.You get 100% of the power you pay for either way. It IS unfortunate that electricity is twice as expensive here (per watt hour) than it is in the US.

 

No. I realize I pay per Kilowatt Hour. What I am saying here is, if you have power fed into your home, and that power is 110vac on each leg, you do not always draw the same current from each leg (side), as that would be almost impossible to do. However, proper electricians should try to wire your home where each side is as balanced as possible.

 

If ALL electrical appliances and devices in our homes were 220vac, and the home were fed by two 110vac legs, then the draw would always be equal, through the meter.

 

See what I mean, now?

 

 

 

 

t IS unfortunate that electricity is twice as expensive here (per watt hour) than it is in the US.

 

Trust me, it COULD be worse. Power here is as high as Php 20 per Kwh, here in Sihanoukville.

 

Fortunately for me, our power rate is about to drop to Php 7.2 per Kwh. We are moving into a home that is on the "Khmer Residential Rate".

Edited by Paul

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