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thebob

We just (Tuesday 21st May) put 24 panels for 6 gigawatts on the roof here on the Gold Coast and the 12 v lines lead all the way down to the side of the house.

And I'm not sure huge cables would help anyway.

 

KonGC

 

 

 

I think I must have meant Mega. The 24 panels should have been a give away.

I'm a computer programmer, not an electrician.

 

KonGC

 

 

 

I think you may mean kilowatts! The losses are pretty big on a 12V system. For example at 12V you need 500 Amps to make 6 kilowatts! To safely carry 500 amps 20 feet you should be using AWG 000 (3/0) that's about 10mm in diameter! In that 20 feet ( approximately 7M) you will loose 5% of the power!

 

At 48V which is a reasonable output for an array the wire only needs to be AWG 10 which is about 2.5mm in diameter for the same loss.

 

Using AWG 10 for a 12V device using 10 amps, your system loss is about 5% every 10 Meters.

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KennyF

>>> I think you may mean kilowatts!

 

Yes maybe.

How many will fit on a floppy disk?

I figure several to a bottle of wine.

 

Anyway, 24 panels.

 

KonGC

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Paul

We just (Tuesday 21st May) put 24 panels for 6 gigawatts on the roof here on the Gold Coast and the 12 v lines lead all the way down to the side of the house.

And I'm not sure huge cables would help anyway.

 

KonGC

 

I think Kenny meant 6,000 watts - each panel is 250 watts, Kenny?

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Knowdafish

Are good quality deep cycle batteries available here? By "good quality", I mean ones that will last from 6-10 years with proper maintenance? 

 

Hello? Anyone?  :cool:

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Sven

Are good quality deep cycle batteries available here? By "good quality", I mean ones that will last from 6-10 years with proper maintenance?

Hello? Anyone? :cool:

Again I think probably you should look to China. They produce deep cycle batteries which can be had for a very reasonable price. If those will really last 10 years or not is an open question of course... but I am not convinced a local supplier would be much more reliable.

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thebob

There are lots of battery rebuilders here, I'd consider collecting a large group of identical scrap batteries and having them rebuilt. Rebuilds can be specked as deep cycle, they are actually easier to make than cranking batteries.

 

Years ago in the UK, telecom batteries on the railway were large glass tanks with suspended plates, they had a sediment drain in the base, and it was obvious where the electrolyte level was. I'd be willing to trade high maintenance for longevity.

 

It reminds me of the criteria for buying a car. Cheap, fast, reliable, pick any 2!

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KennyF

I think Kenny meant 6,000 watts - each panel is 250 watts, Kenny?

 

Yes, 6 kilowatt sounds like it.

And the cables are quite  large.

 

post-4822-0-09023600-1369357747_thumb.jpgpost-4822-0-47391100-1369357763_thumb.jpg

 

KonGC

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Paul

Thanks for the photos. Still, with no batteries for storage, this installation is only useful (in making the meter turn backward) until the power is cut. You will still be sitting in the dark when the power goes out.

 

With the money it is making the home owner, he should see about expanding his system.

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Dolsos

Thanks for the photos. Still, with no batteries for storage, this installation is only useful (in making the meter turn backward) until the power is cut. You will still be sitting in the dark when the power goes out.

 

With the money it is making the home owner, he should see about expanding his system.

 

 

If I get a solar system it would be primarily to save money, I was thinking of getting a 1.5-2kw pv system and when finances allow do a smaller system with batteries that would only run the ref and lights in a blackout system.  Maybe a fan or two as well but not powerful enough for an aircon...

 

I looked at our last power bill, we used 397 kwh, so if I wanted to be able to increase our use of a/c I think a 2kw system would do it, just rough guessing on 8 hours of power a day.  2x8x30 = 480kwh a month.  Am I calculating that wrong?   8 hours a good number for generating hours or should I adjust it?

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KennyF

 

Still, with no batteries for storage, this installation is only useful (in making the meter turn backward) until the power is cut. You will still be sitting in the dark when the power goes out.

 

I'm living on the Gold Coast in Queensland, not SEA.

There hasn't been a blackout of note here in many many years.

 

Putting your excess on the grid pays off better than a battery bank (in our situation)

First, obviously, there's no need to buy and maintain batteries.

And then, in daylight hours, excess power is sold to the grid at 44 cents a unit.

At night, it's bought back for 19 cents a unit.

Resulting in a net gain which pays for the system in hopefully 5 years.

 

KonGC

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KennyF


I looked at our last power bill, we used 397 kwh, so if I wanted to be able to increase our use of a/c I think a 2kw system would do it, just rough guessing on 8 hours of power a day. 2x8x30 = 480kwh a month. Am I calculating that wrong? 8 hours a good number for generating hours or should I adjust it?

 

I think you'll find that a setup stated to provide, for instance, 10 KWH will on average provide something like 5 or 6.

 

Here's an interesting chart. Cebu would be about the same as Sydney and Brisbane.


post-4822-0-98820200-1369361858_thumb.jpg

 

Note than none is more than half the stated rating.

 

KonGC

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ThomsonJr

 "If you live far off on an island it might be nice to actually have solar panels cause of the cost of getting electricity on the island (and you could start selling it to neighbours)"

 

I see money in that !  :popcorn: 

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KennyF

 "If you live far off on an island it might be nice to actually have solar panels cause of the cost of getting electricity on the island (and you could start selling it to neighbours)"

 

I see money in that !  :popcorn: 

 

On Camiguin island the power company (co-op I think) don't charge users who use little energy.

I can't remember what the point is but it allow users to burn a low power light or two for free.

 

KonGC

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smokey

 

 

The Heliodome, a bioclimatic solar house is seen in Cosswiller in the Alsacian countryside near Strasbourg, Eastern France, August 4, 2011. The house is designed as a giant three-dimensional sundial, set on a fixed angle in relationship to the sun's movements to provide shade during the summer months, keeping the inside temperature cool, and during Fall, Winter and Spring sunlight enters the large windows as the sun's position is lower in the sky, thus warming the living space. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler

 

 

 

 

post-35-0-34706600-1369379305_thumb.jpg

 

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KennyF

Yeh, but would you want to live in it?

 

KonGC

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