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Woolf

Panel inclination should match the # of degrees N. of the equator you are. As an example, if you are 7 degrees north of the equator your panels should be facing south at 7 degrees to give you the best average amount of intense sunshine in a day.

 

Remember that tropic of cancer is 23° 26′ 16″ N and Cebu City is at about 11° N, so part of the year the sun is to the north in Cebu City

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I think virtually all solar panels are made in China. Mine certainly are. If I wanted to fit some panels in Cebu, I would look to import some directly from China to there. I would get a few samples fi

I have installed over 100 solar panels - ALL of them on R.V.'s. The largest system was on a bus with a huge bank of batteries and 2 very large inverters. I have a very good friend whose warehouse mana

If the dust is so bad, it may affect your health sooner or later. Maybe that is not a great place to build a house anyway..!

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A bit more info that may be of use.

 

I have 12 x 250W Panels arranged in two rows of six.  The roof they are on slopes at about 40 degrees and is facing due South give or take a couple of degrees.   The micro inverters are required because in Winter with the low sun, two trees in neighbouring gardens shade any two panels in the bottom row as the sun moves.  The w**kers who own the trees will not lop the tops off even at my expense.

 

The output on a sunny May day:

post-7781-0-74118200-1369213736_thumb.jpg

 

The impact of a cloudy day:

post-7781-0-20464200-1369213898_thumb.jpg

 

The micro inverters allow you to monitor individual panels and some panels will consistently produce more power than others.  In fact the installer told me that the 250W and 240W panels roll off the same production line.  The panels are Sharp or Sanyo, I forget which.

 

It is an overcast day as I type this.  This is what the monitor shows:

post-7781-0-12057500-1369214631_thumb.jpg

 

In the UK if the power on the grid fails your solar panels should automatically switch off.  If the grid is turned off for maintenance it could still have significant power flowing in it from solar panels potentially giving the electricity company workers a nasty shock.  If you install in Cebu you may want some safety cutoff that prevents excess power flowing back to the grid in cases of power failure in case it is planned maintenance and you are deemed to have injured a worker.

 

Now in the UK installers are including an option that any excess electricity from the solar panels is used to heat the hot water tank.  I may have this retrofitted in the future when I replace the hot water tank.

 

In Cebu, if you use air conditioners during the day I guess solar panels might be a good investment.

 

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Sven

Anyone have experience on working with solar panels and running only 12 Volt appliances? Most energy is lost converting it and I know you could run a shit load of appliances just on 12V so you can have a very cheap system without power loss and just run LED-Lights, waterpumps and other small household appliances straight from your own power production.

Sure, that is what I do.

It also has the benefit that you can do all the work yourself... No need for an electrician.

Sven

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Dolsos

 www.solarsystemsphilippines.com

 

Seems reasonable for a 1-2 kw kit, may not completely cover my usage but would put a pretty big dent in the monthly bill. 

 

1.5kw grid tie kit:  roughly 190k

 

 

The items inside the kit are:

  • Solar Panel (Yingli Poly 250W) Solar Panels – 6pcs.
  • Grid-Tie Inverter (Samel Power 1600TL) – 1pc.
  • Solar Mounting System (Al-6063-T6) - 1set
  • Connectors & Cables – 1set
  • Installation & Operation Manual – 1 set
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Knowdafish

I think the main issue is the upfront cost of a tracking system. And maintenance of course.

 

I did consider this for my own installation. But I decided against it, because the efficiency does not suffer all that much even if the angle towards the sun is less than perfect. Besides, in my area there are many grey days, where the angle does not matter much (although the panels still deliver a bit of power). Overall, the extra cost for a tracking system would never be recouped.

 

Sven

 

It is generally agreed by most that the electricity gained by using trackers is not worth their extra cost. It is cheaper just to buy extra panels to make up any loss in efficiency. The only exception is if you don't have room for extra panels. 

 

I can't find the article now but I saw a solar tracking method that used a material that would shrink or expand in direct sunlight, so depending on where the sun is it would tilt the platform toward the sun and as it moved away the other side would start shrinking keeping the panel facing toward the sun.  I'm not explaining it well, trying to find the article but for the life of me can't remember where I saw it.

 

 

Edit:  No diagrams but at least the gist of the technology

 

http://www.news.wisc.edu/20967

 

Their are a multitude of different styles of tracking systems. Besides what I mentioned above, the other problem with them here is wind load. When a panel is laying flat they don't catch much wind, but tilt them, especially at extreme angles and they do catch a lot of wind. Damaged panels generate no electricity.

 

Remember that tropic of cancer is 23° 26′ 16″ N and Cebu City is at about 11° N, so part of the year the sun is to the north in Cebu City

 

That is why I said the best AVERAGE is for them to be mounted to match the latitude of your location. Remember from school (?) that the intensity of sunlight varies year round and travels from the Tropic of Cancer to the Tropic of Capricorn? As much as the sun would be at a higher latitude than Cebu, it spends more time at lower latitudes throughout the year. 

 

geochrone.gif

 

A MUCH more cost effective way to generate electricity than solar panels:

 

249161_10151457318896840_959259488_n.jpg

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tomaw

There is a company that sells them in Cebu and installs them.

But it's a expensive investment. I was thinking myself running completely on solar but running against a 8.8PHP per KWH is too cheap to be able to run a decent sized solar system for 15/25 years. Especially with this heat that will feck your batteries.

 

Anyways, i've been digging in to the subject for a long time and actually found a off the track VECO plant in the mountains that has Solar panels. So there is a market and it could be do-able. But it all depends if you live on or off the grid. If you live far off on an island it might be nice to actually have solar panels cause of the cost of getting electricity on the island (and you could start selling it to neighbours)

 

The meter runs backwards, so that would safe on cost. Not sure though if you exceed your own consumption if they will start paying you back.

 

Anyone have experience on working with solar panels and running only 12 Volt appliances? Most energy is lost converting it and I know you could run a shit load of appliances just on 12V so you can have a very cheap system without power loss and just run LED-Lights, waterpumps and other small household appliances straight from your own power production.

 

 

 

Had a estimate rendered by the local Solar power seller, for 300W running 24hours a day with

 

You will need 2 kilowatt solar panels to run 300 watt load for 24hrs.

 

 

The total cost with installation is P630,000.00.

 

With backup for 3 days, you will need 3 kilowatt setup with extra batteries.

The total cost with installation is P1,020,000.00.

 

If only for backup for 3 days without solar panel, the total cost with installation is P380,000.00.

 

 

So don't expect it to be cheap... And 300Watts runs basically nothing, if you would like a fully stocked house (aircons, refrigrator/freezer, flatscreentv, watercooler/heater etc etc) you'll need to generate a lot more.

 

 

Would love to setup a hybrid system of omni-directional wind generators and solar panels and live offgrid

....... Thanks. This is the first time I've seen the price. You're right. It ain't cheap!
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Sven

A meter that goes backwards is a better deal than a dual meter that records incoming and outgoing electricity. Why? Some electricity companies will buy the excess electricity you use at their wholesale rate and turn right around and sell it back to you at their retail rate! Such a deal! At least with a meter that runs backwards you are not losing out on a deal like that.

Well if you think about it, it may make sense that the company buys your power for less than they sell it for...

That is because they are providing a valuable service by making power instantly available at any time you want.. While the power you generate from solar panels and the like will likely be intermittent, and typically not available when power is needed the most.

Achieving the same effect by way of batteries would cost a fortune. Hence it is perhaps not unreasonable that they make a profit...

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Paul

You know, recently, I have had a number of people on forums, in person, or by other forms of communication, tell me about their grid tied solar arrays - without batteries. The main idea, for me anyway, is to have a source that will provide power for you when the mains are cut.
 
Folks, you can generate all the power you can hope for, via a pv panel array to help defray your electric utility costs. But, if the mains get cut, your panels will stop generating (or they should be set up to!) power and you will still be, very much, in the dark.
 
I cannot see putting that kind of money into a solar array, solely to have it spin my electric meter backwards.
 
So, if you are going to set up a solar array, definitely consider adding the one thing you need to store all that power you are generating:

 

EB130.gif

 

batteries_24.gif

 

solar-battery-bank-4300-watt.gif

 

 

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Knowdafish

Are good quality deep cycle batteries available here? By "good quality", I mean ones that will last from 6-10 years with proper maintenance? 

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thebob

 

Anyone have experience on working with solar panels and running only 12 Volt appliances? Most energy is lost converting it and I know you could run a shit load of appliances just on 12V so you can have a very cheap system without power loss and just run LED-Lights, waterpumps and other small household appliances straight from your own power production.

 

Sure, that is what I do.
It also has the benefit that you can do all the work yourself... No need for an electrician.
Sven

 

The problem with 12V systems is that you need huge cables because of line losses. 

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KennyF

 

The problem with 12V systems is that you need huge cables because of line losses.

 

We just (Tuesday 21st May) put 24 panels for 6 gigawatts on the roof here on the Gold Coast and the 12 v lines lead all the way down to the side of the house.

And I'm not sure huge cables would help anyway.

 

KonGC

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Dolsos

 

We just (Tuesday 21st May) put 24 panels for 6 gigawatts

 

Wow, thats an impressive system, how big is the city you're powering?

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Sven

The problem with 12V systems is that you need huge cables because of line losses.

We just (Tuesday 21st May) put 24 panels for 6 gigawatts on the roof here on the Gold Coast and the 12 v lines lead all the way down to the side of the house.

And I'm not sure huge cables would help anyway.

 

KonGC

 

Are you sure? Usually it takes nuclear power to produce more than a gigawatt.... See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orders_of_magnitude_(power)

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Sven

The problem with 12V systems is that you need huge cables because of line losses.

That is true. It is a one time installation though.

Also, the cables from the solar panels to the charger can be thin, if you connect the panels serially and if the charger is of MPPT type. In other words, higher voltage on the input side than on the output side.

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KennyF

 

Are you sure? Usually it takes nuclear power to produce more than a gigawatt

 

I think I must have meant Mega. The 24 panels should have been a give away.

I'm a computer programmer, not an electrician.

 

KonGC

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