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broden

we plan to use them in the RP when we retire there and here in the states  down the road at some point .. no real rush just yet 

 

but the price of electric is always on the rise .. and the technology gets better and hopefully cheaper

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I think virtually all solar panels are made in China. Mine certainly are. If I wanted to fit some panels in Cebu, I would look to import some directly from China to there. I would get a few samples fi

I have installed over 100 solar panels - ALL of them on R.V.'s. The largest system was on a bus with a huge bank of batteries and 2 very large inverters. I have a very good friend whose warehouse mana

If the dust is so bad, it may affect your health sooner or later. Maybe that is not a great place to build a house anyway..!

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Truthfully, if I were thinking of installing a PV system, and I was moving from the US to the Philippines, I would get the roll-up PV strips that can be adhered to standing seam metal roofing. Then I would ship them to myself in BB boxes, and install them myself once here. In the US, you can not only get the material, but you can get instruction on how to install it. The PV materials you can find here will be more expensive and less advanced, and no help on how to self-install it is available. Basically, you will likely have to hire a PV company from Manila to install it for you...with all the expense that goes with that. Get schooled up and equipped BEFORE you move.

 

For those still in the US, but planning to move here, you need to map things out in advance. Buy your land first. Design your house (while you are in the US) and buy and ship things like electrical wire, boxes, switches, outlets, lighting fixtures, breaker boxes, breakers, plumbing fixtures, any PV panels and equipment, and whatever else you can think of that is easier to find (quality) in the US than in the Philippines. I had thought about getting the foam concrete forming system to build a house here, but then we bought a house instead of building one from scratch. Just have it sent to yourself here. Depending on how much you ship and how big things are, you will need to decide between BB boxes or a small container.

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tomaw

Truthfully, if I were thinking of installing a PV system, and I was moving from the US to the Philippines, I would get the roll-up PV strips that can be adhered to standing seam metal roofing. Then I would ship them to myself in BB boxes, and install them myself once here. In the US, you can not only get the material, but you can get instruction on how to install it. The PV materials you can find here will be more expensive and less advanced, and no help on how to self-install it is available. Basically, you will likely have to hire a PV company from Manila to install it for you...with all the expense that goes with that. Get schooled up and equipped BEFORE you move.

 

For those still in the US, but planning to move here, you need to map things out in advance. Buy your land first. Design your house (while you are in the US) and buy and ship things like electrical wire, boxes, switches, outlets, lighting fixtures, breaker boxes, breakers, plumbing fixtures, any PV panels and equipment, and whatever else you can think of that is easier to find (quality) in the US than in the Philippines. I had thought about getting the foam concrete forming system to build a house here, but then we bought a house instead of building one from scratch. Just have it sent to yourself here. Depending on how much you ship and how big things are, you will need to decide between BB boxes or a small container.

........ Thanks. This is all good information. I plan on shipping a container anyway for appliances. I'm also looking at the foam/concrete blocks. On another thread I believe MB's Garden Inn was built this way. More information on the solar roof and some great pictures are provided by David_LivinginTalisay in the roofing thread . Edited by tomaw
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I too have solar panels on my house in London.  You need to consider what type of inverters you will use.  Any shading on one panel will apparently impact the production of electricity on every panel on that inverter.  Because of shading from trees at certain times in the winter when the sun is lower I went for micro-inverters, one per panel.  More expensive, but it maximises electricity generation and the inverters should last as long as the panels, 20 years plus.  I understand the larger inverters will only last half the life of the panels before needing replacement.

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Sven

I only found one web site selling solar panels in Cebu and someone on another thread said they use inferior products made in China.

I think virtually all solar panels are made in China. Mine certainly are. If I wanted to fit some panels in Cebu, I would look to import some directly from China to there. I would get a few samples first, then play around with them, and buy more if they worked out well. eBay is your friend, you can look up dozens of suppliers easily.

 

Flexible or "roll up" solar panels are nice - but much more expensive than the rigid kind.

 

The technology is pretty straight forward... There are no moving parts, nothing much that can break, except the panel surfaces of course. The tricky bit is not really the panels themselves, but rather the charger/inverter box that converts the electricity.

 

There is a lot written about the subject on the Internet. If you are a DIY kind of guy with some spare time, you can easily learn what it takes to fit and maintain solar panels, IMHO. Except perhaps the mains electric end of the system... That bit should be handled by an electrician.

 

For a gentle and fun introduction to the art, why not start with a system separate from the mains: All it takes is some 12V or 24V panels, a car battery or two, a $20 charger and some caravan style lighting. The system can then be expanded and maybe connected to the mains at a later time.

 

Sven

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tomaw

 

I too have solar panels on my house in London. You need to consider what type of inverters you will use. Any shading on one panel will apparently impact the production of electricity on every panel on that inverter. Because of shading from trees at certain times in the winter when the sun is lower I went for micro-inverters, one per panel. More expensive, but it maximises electricity generation and the inverters should last as long as the panels, 20 years plus. I understand the larger inverters will only last half the life of the panels before needing replacement.

.......Thanks. That's good information. Hopefully no one will be dumb enough to put solar pannels in the shade. LOL!!!
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tomaw

This has been a great thread so far! Thanks to all that contributed.

Edited by tomaw
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tomaw

 

A meter that goes backwards is a better deal than a dual meter that records incoming and outgoing electricity. Why? Some electricity companies will buy the excess electricity you use at their wholesale rate and turn right around and sell it back to you at their retail rate! Such a deal! At least with a meter that runs backwards you are not losing out on a deal like that.

.... Thanks. I'll rember that.
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thebob

There are lots of them here in Japan, most are tied to your electric meter and have batteries as well. There are formula to calculate sizing that includes excess to accumulate enough money to pay for a new system every 20 years. Batteries are needed because otherwise everyone would generate during the day, and there would be a huge demand at night. The system becomes more efficient the more installations there are because excess is generally used locally and doesn't have to travel far reducing transmission losses.

 

Some systems incorporate an EV car. The car is tied to the system and can be used as a backup power supply for the house.

 

Presently I think that you need to start by designing the most efficient house that you can. That is where the most savings are. Unfortunately upgrading battery banks isn't an incremental process. Batteries used together develop a relationship and do not work as well if you add or subtract units.

 

I disagree with the post saying that trackers aren't worth the cost. The problem is that because they are a mechanical system they require a lot of maintenance and adjustment.

 

Scale is everything. As the installation gets bigger the cost per watt drops off. Unfortunately if you want to generate and distribute in Cebu you need to follow the same regulations as a power company. I imagine sub division scale systems that could be run to pay for the maintenance costs of the sub division.

 

Group buys would save a lot of money. 5 or 10 installations at a time would be far cheaper than individually. Buying bare cells and assembling panels is a more efficient way to cover odd sized roofs, as well as saving a lot of money on shipping. Framing and laminating epoxy are readily available here.

 

If you have land with a river, a micro hydro system is constant, so you don't need as many batteries, and is less obtrusive. A small wind turbine is a very useful addition to a solar array. Wind is often stronger when you have most demand in the evenings and early mornings.

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tomaw

There are lots of them here in Japan, most are tied to your electric meter and have batteries as well. There are formula to calculate sizing that includes excess to accumulate enough money to pay for a new system every 20 years. Batteries are needed because otherwise everyone would generate during the day, and there would be a huge demand at night. The system becomes more efficient the more installations there are because excess is generally used locally and doesn't have to travel far reducing transmission losses.

 

Some systems incorporate an EV car. The car is tied to the system and can be used as a backup power supply for the house.

 

Presently I think that you need to start by designing the most efficient house that you can. That is where the most savings are. Unfortunately upgrading battery banks isn't an incremental process. Batteries used together develop a relationship and do not work as well if you add or subtract units.

 

I disagree with the post saying that trackers aren't worth the cost. The problem is that because they are a mechanical system they require a lot of maintenance and adjustment.

 

Scale is everything. As the installation gets bigger the cost per watt drops off. Unfortunately if you want to generate and distribute in Cebu you need to follow the same regulations as a power company. I imagine sub division scale systems that could be run to pay for the maintenance costs of the sub division.

 

Group buys would save a lot of money. 5 or 10 installations at a time would be far cheaper than individually. Buying bare cells and assembling panels is a more efficient way to cover odd sized roofs, as well as saving a lot of money on shipping. Framing and laminating epoxy are readily available here.

 

If you have land with a river, a micro hydro system is constant, so you don't need as many batteries, and is less obtrusive. A small wind turbine is a very useful addition to a solar array. Wind is often stronger when you have most demand in the evenings and early mornings.

..... Thanks for that information. I'm gkad to hear it's cheaper with more homes into it. There will be 3 houses in all.(1) My wife and I, (2) My wife's sister and her American husband and mother, (3) my wife's other sister, Filipino huband and three kids.
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Sven

 

 

I too have solar panels on my house in London. You need to consider what type of inverters you will use. Any shading on one panel will apparently impact the production of electricity on every panel on that inverter....

.......Thanks. That's good information. Hopefully no one will be dumb enough to put solar pannels in the shade. LOL!!!

Well that happens. Because... Shades can move from one minute to another, and through the day, and through the year, and even as the years pass. Amazing, no? :-)

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Paul

laminating epoxy are readily available here.

 

You shouldn't use epoxy to cover the cells when constructing a PV panel. Epoxy will not expand like Dow Corning Encapsulant does. This can, and will cause the cells to break due to heat expansion during the day.

 

 

 

I disagree

with the post saying that trackers aren't worth the cost. The problem

is that because they are a mechanical system they require a lot of

maintenance and adjustment.

 

One of the drawbacks of a tracking system, is the fact that it draws the very power you generate in order to run.

 

In my mind, though, it seems it would be beneficial and worth that amount of power used, due to keeping the PV panels in the most direct sun light for most of the day.

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Sven

I disagree with the post saying that trackers aren't worth the cost. The problem is that because they are a mechanical system they require a lot of maintenance and adjustment.

One of the drawbacks of a tracking system, is the fact that it draws the very power you generate in order to run. In my mind, though, it seems it would be beneficial and worth that amount of power used, due to keeping the PV panels in the most direct sun light for most of the day.

I think the main issue is the upfront cost of a tracking system. And maintenance of course.

 

I did consider this for my own installation. But I decided against it, because the efficiency does not suffer all that much even if the angle towards the sun is less than perfect. Besides, in my area there are many grey days, where the angle does not matter much (although the panels still deliver a bit of power). Overall, the extra cost for a tracking system would never be recouped.

 

Sven

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There is a company that sells them in Cebu and installs them.

But it's a expensive investment. I was thinking myself running completely on solar but running against a 8.8PHP per KWH is too cheap to be able to run a decent sized solar system for 15/25 years. Especially with this heat that will feck your batteries.

 

Anyways, i've been digging in to the subject for a long time and actually found a off the track VECO plant in the mountains that has Solar panels. So there is a market and it could be do-able. But it all depends if you live on or off the grid. If you live far off on an island it might be nice to actually have solar panels cause of the cost of getting electricity on the island (and you could start selling it to neighbours)

The meter runs backwards, so that would safe on cost. Not sure though if you exceed your own consumption if they will start paying you back.

 

Anyone have experience on working with solar panels and running only 12 Volt appliances? Most energy is lost converting it and I know you could run a shit load of appliances just on 12V so you can have a very cheap system without power loss and just run LED-Lights, waterpumps and other small household appliances straight from your own power production.



Had a estimate rendered by the local Solar power seller, for 300W running 24hours a day with

You will need 2 kilowatt solar panels to run 300 watt load for 24hrs.


The total cost with installation is P630,000.00.

With backup for 3 days, you will need 3 kilowatt setup with extra batteries.
The total cost with installation is P1,020,000.00.

If only for backup for 3 days without solar panel, the total cost with installation is P380,000.00.


So don't expect it to be cheap... And 300Watts runs basically nothing, if you would like a fully stocked house (aircons, refrigrator/freezer, flatscreentv, watercooler/heater etc etc) you'll need to generate a lot more.
 


Would love to setup a hybrid system of omni-directional wind generators and solar panels and live offgrid

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Dolsos

You shouldn't use epoxy to cover the cells when constructing a PV panel. Epoxy will not expand like Dow Corning Encapsulant does. This can, and will cause the cells to break, due to heat expansion during the day.

 

 

 

 

One of the drawbacks of a tracking system, is the fact that it draws the very power you generate in order to run.

 

In my mind, though, it seems it would be beneficial and worth that amount of power used, due to keeping the PV panels in the most direct sun light for most of the day.

 

 

I can't find the article now but I saw a solar tracking method that used a material that would shrink or expand in direct sunlight, so depending on where the sun is it would tilt the platform toward the sun and as it moved away the other side would start shrinking keeping the panel facing toward the sun.  I'm not explaining it well, trying to find the article but for the life of me can't remember where I saw it.

 

 

Edit:  No diagrams but at least the gist of the technology

 

http://www.news.wisc.edu/20967

Edited by Dolsos
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