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tomaw

Is anyone in Cebu or surrounding area using solar energy to generate electricity for their home? If so, how's it working out for you? Has it saved you money on your electric bill? Can you go 100% solar and not use the electric company at all? I appreciate any advice based on positive or negative experiences you've had.

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I think virtually all solar panels are made in China. Mine certainly are. If I wanted to fit some panels in Cebu, I would look to import some directly from China to there. I would get a few samples fi

I have installed over 100 solar panels - ALL of them on R.V.'s. The largest system was on a bus with a huge bank of batteries and 2 very large inverters. I have a very good friend whose warehouse mana

If the dust is so bad, it may affect your health sooner or later. Maybe that is not a great place to build a house anyway..!

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Sven

I am using solar panels as one of my energy sources, not in Cebu but in London.

One lesson I think is universal: in practice, you cannot live exclusively off solar power. That is because there will be gray days with very little energy generation. You would need a huge bank of batteries just to carry you through the nights. Batteries cost a lot and need replacing from time to time... hence the whole thing gets prohibitively expensive.

 

I think, however, solar is great in combination with other energy sources. The prices have come down a lot recently.

 

Sven

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udonthani

Cebu might get double the amount of rainfall London gets, but it also gets double the amount of sunny hours.

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tomaw

 

Cebu might get double the amount of rainfall London gets, but it also gets double the amount of sunny hours.

.......... I read somewhere the weather has little to do with getting solar energy to work. When you think about it, iif no sunlight got through the clouds on a rainy day it would be as dark as night time.
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tomaw

I am using solar panels as one of my energy sources, not in Cebu but in London.

One lesson I think is universal: in practice, you cannot live exclusively off solar power. That is because there will be gray days with very little energy generation. You would need a huge bank of batteries just to carry you through the nights. Batteries cost a lot and need replacing from time to time... hence the whole thing gets prohibitively expensive.

 

I think, however, solar is great in combination with other energy sources. The prices have come down a lot recently.

 

Sven

........... Thanks for that info. I'm glad to hear from someone actually doing it even though it's in London. The batteries are one of my concerns also, not only for the house but hybrid or all electric cars as well. For the house the batteries would be necessary since most appliences and electronics are run more at night than during the day. Edited by tomaw
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Dolsos

.......... I read somewhere the weather has little to do with getting solar energy to work. When you think about it, iif no sunlight got through the clouds on a rainy day it would be as dark as night time.

 

 

There's definately a noticeable difference in direct sunlight beaming down on panels and indirect sunlight being filtered through clouds.  You'll notice significant differences in power generation depending on weather.

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tomaw

 

There's definately a noticeable difference in direct sunlight beaming down on panels and indirect sunlight being filtered through clouds. You'll notice significant differences in power generation depending on weather.

... Thanks. I'll keep that in mind.
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Knowdafish

I have installed over 100 solar panels - ALL of them on R.V.'s. The largest system was on a bus with a huge bank of batteries and 2 very large inverters. I have a very good friend whose warehouse managers house is 100% run by solar in Central California (San Louise Obispo) . There the electricity company, by law, has to buy back any excess you generate. His system generates excess during the day, and he "buys" it back at night. Doing this avoids having to have batteries and the cost involved. He had up to a $900 electric bill before and got fed up. When it was installed a few years back California was not quite broke yet and offered up to a $20k (or was it $30k?) tax credit so that definitely helped. A 100% solar powered system is doable, but can be expensive. 

 

There are all kinds of solar websites that will help you predict how many watts you need to power your house in a given area. They aren't 100% accurate but come close. They take into account weather and geographical location. 

 

As close as we are to the equator, you will not find too many places that have as intense a sun as the Philippines. 

 

Panel inclination should match the # of degrees N. of the equator you are. As an example, if you are 7 degrees north of the equator your panels should be facing south at 7 degrees to give you the best average amount of intense sunshine in a day. 

 

This does not include mounts that track the movement of the sun, which by most counts, seem to NOT be cost effective. 

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tomaw

I have installed over 100 solar panels - ALL of them on R.V.'s. The largest system was on a bus with a huge bank of batteries and 2 very large inverters. I have a very good friend whose warehouse managers house is 100% run by solar in Central California (San Louise Obispo) . There the electricity company, by law, has to buy back any excess you generate. His system generates excess during the day, and he "buys" it back at night. Doing this avoids having to have batteries and the cost involved. He had up to a $900 electric bill before and got fed up. When it was installed a few years back California was not quite broke yet and offered up to a $20k (or was it $30k?) tax credit so that definitely helped. A 100% solar powered system is doable, but can be expensive.

 

There are all kinds of solar websites that will help you predict how many watts you need to power your house in a given area. They aren't 100% accurate but come close. They take into account weather and geographical location.

 

As close as we are to the equator, you will not find too many places that have as intense a sun as the Philippines.

 

Panel inclination should match the # of degrees N. of the equator you are. As an example, if you are 7 degrees north of the equator your panels should be facing south at 7 degrees to give you the best average amount of intense sunshine in a day.

 

This does not include mounts that track the movement of the sun, which by most counts, seem to NOT be cost effective.

.... Thanks! I'm glad to hear from someone that has a lot of experience in this. That's great information on your friend's house. I'm in S. California and been told the meters actually go backward as you use solar energy. What your friend has going sounds fantastic! I highly doubt though if Cebu's electric company will be that cooperative. Edited by tomaw
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Dolsos

.... Thanks! That's great information on your friend's house. I'm in S. California and been told the meters actually go backward as you use solar energy. What your frind has going sounds fantastic! I highly doubt though if Cebu's electric company will be that cooperative.

 

 

Theres been other threads that do confirm the meters here go backwards if you overproduce during the day.  I have no firsthand experience with it but if you search you'll find the threads here, they were pretty recent.

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tomaw

 

Theres been other threads that do confirm the meters here go backwards if you overproduce during the day. I have no firsthand experience with it but if you search you'll find the threads here, they were pretty recent.

.......... Thanks! I'm glad to hear that.
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Knowdafish

.... Thanks! I'm glad to hear from someone that has a lot of experience in this. That's great information on your friend's house. I'm in S. California and been told the meters actually go backward as you use solar energy. What your friend has going sounds fantastic! I highly doubt though if Cebu's electric company will be that cooperative.

A meter that goes backwards is a better deal than a dual meter that records incoming and outgoing electricity. Why? Some electricity companies will buy the excess electricity you use at their wholesale rate and turn right around and sell it back to you at their retail rate! Such a deal! At least with a meter that runs backwards you are not losing out on a deal like that. 

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tomaw

I have installed over 100 solar panels - ALL of them on R.V.'s. The largest system was on a bus with a huge bank of batteries and 2 very large inverters. I have a very good friend whose warehouse managers house is 100% run by solar in Central California (San Louise Obispo) . There the electricity company, by law, has to buy back any excess you generate. His system generates excess during the day, and he "buys" it back at night. Doing this avoids having to have batteries and the cost involved. He had up to a $900 electric bill before and got fed up. When it was installed a few years back California was not quite broke yet and offered up to a $20k (or was it $30k?) tax credit so that definitely helped. A 100% solar powered system is doable, but can be expensive.

 

There are all kinds of solar websites that will help you predict how many watts you need to power your house in a given area. They aren't 100% accurate but come close. They take into account weather and geographical location.

 

As close as we are to the equator, you will not find too many places that have as intense a sun as the Philippines.

 

Panel inclination should match the # of degrees N. of the equator you are. As an example, if you are 7 degrees north of the equator your panels should be facing south at 7 degrees to give you the best average amount of intense sunshine in a day.

 

This does not include mounts that track the movement of the sun, which by most counts, seem to NOT be cost effective.

.......... Do you live in or near Cebu? Do you have a business doing this? If not you might want to consider it. I only found one web site selling solar panels in Cebu and someone on another thread said they use inferior products made in China.
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Knowdafish

.......... Do you live in or near Cebu? Do you have a business doing this? If not you might want to consider it. I only found one web site selling solar panels in Cebu and someone on another thread said they use inferior products made in China.

I live in Dumaguete. I've thought about it, but my passions lie in another direction.

 

I have no problems going with solar when I build some of my future projects! 

 

There are a few decent solar installers in the Philippines, at least there was the last time I checked on sulit.com.ph  For a large enough system they will travel anywhere.

 

Most solar companies here seem to be short lived though. There goes any warranty! 

 

As a side note, the import duty required by the Philippine government on solar panels seems quite high the last time I checked. I think I would get them from suppliers in the U.S. where they have the latest and greatest panels and your warranty would be backed up by a legit company, instead of an unknown being China. 

 

If they don't last at least 20 years you are not getting your moneys worth. Buying something of poor quality is not the way to save $$.

 

PM me if  you want to save $$ on duty. 

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tomaw

I live in Dumaguete. I've thought about it, but my passions lie in another direction.

 

I have no problems going with solar when I build some of my future projects!

 

There are a few decent solar installers in the Philippines, at least there was the last time I checked on sulit.com.ph For a large enough system they will travel anywhere.

 

Most solar companies here seem to be short lived though. There goes any warranty!

 

As a side note, the import duty required by the Philippine government on solar panels seems quite high the last time I checked. I think I would get them from suppliers in the U.S. where they have the latest and greatest panels and your warranty would be backed up by a legit company, instead of an unknown being China.

 

If they don't last at least 20 years you are not getting your moneys worth. Buying something of poor quality is not the way to save $$.

 

PM me if you want to save $$ on duty.

...... Thanks for all that informaion. It will be at least a couple of years before I'm ready. If your still around I'll talk to you then. Thanks.
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