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Exotic-looking yet inexpensive, bamboo flooring grows in popularity


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smokey
Exotic-looking yet inexpensive, bamboo flooring grows in popularitybv172x44-gif_043356.gifBy Elizabeth Arnold | Bob Vila – Thu, May 16, 2013 8:21 PM EDT

If you're looking to install new hardwood floors, why not consider today's eco-friendly alternative, bamboo?

Considered a renewable resource because it grows so quickly, a freshly harvested bamboo plant only takes about seven years to reach maturity again. Of course, hardwood trees like oak, ash, and maple regenerate also, but it takes them considerably longer, at least 40 or 50 years. (Related: Eco-Friendly Flooring: 5 Ways to Go Green from the Bottom Up.)

There's no denying that bamboo flooring can look as beautiful as hardwood. It can even offer a comparable level of durability. But its looks and longevity depend on the variety chosen. On the one hand, there's natural bamboo, light in color (almost blond), which boasts twice the stability of red oak (America's most popular flooring). On the other hand, there's carbonized bamboo, a darker and softer, less resilient material. 

[Thinking about changing your flooring? Click to find the right contractor now.]

Tiger-Strand-Bambooflooring-morningstarbA tiger stripe design.Though comparatively few color variations are to be found in bamboo, a range of design options are available, from edge-grain planks to exotic, striped "tiger" designs. Note that solid bamboo is stronger than engineered, which consists of multiple layers. If intent on the latter, choose a product featuring a 1/4-inch-thick top layer for best results. 

Coming in between $5 and $8 per square foot (before installation), bamboo flooring is on par with, or less costly, than traditional hardwoods. If you're handy, you can install bamboo flooring by nailing or gluing it directly onto the subfloor. If you opt to have a professional install the floor, expect to pay between $3 and $5.50 per square foot. 

Bamboo Flooring Pros:

• High-quality bamboo wears as well and lasts as long as traditional hardwood.
• Bamboo flooring lends a clean, modern appearance to any room.
• Bamboo is more sustainable than traditional hardwoods.
• You can easily clean bamboo flooring with a mop and mild soap; no special treatments are required.

Bamboo Flooring Cons:

• Inexpensive bamboo may be prone to dents and scratches.
• Bamboo flooring from China may contain high levels of urea formaldehyde, a toxic chemical; make sure the flooring you buy is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).
• The contemporary look of bamboo may not fit in with a vintage- or antique-inspired home decor 

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Exotic-looking yet inexpensive, bamboo flooring grows in popularityBy Elizabeth Arnold | Bob Vila – Thu, May 16, 2013 8:21 PM EDT Bob Vila/Morning Star Bamboo - Bamboo Flooring 101 Email 0 R

I recall posting to a Thread about fitting out a Condominium, regarding Bamboo Flooring.     I also recall having checked the specifications, and the humidity range made me think it was not really s

its just a lot of doom and gloom from the guys who keep saying do as i say .... wood floors in my house are fine been there over 8 years look good ,, dont have any termite problems i have had more pro

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broden

we looked at these when we were still house shopping .. we both like hardwood but dogs do a job on hard wood so we won't put any on the ground floor where ... all tile helps keep the house cooler .. but there are nice porcelain tiles now that look like wood floors and there is on section of our first floor we will eventually put those down in .. it's the only part of the first floor that is carpet now 

 

but yeah those bamboo floors are very nice

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David_LivinginTalisay

I recall posting to a Thread about fitting out a Condominium, regarding Bamboo Flooring.  

 

I also recall having checked the specifications, and the humidity range made me think it was not really suitable for Philippines with its 80% humidity all the year around,

 

What if water gets split or a pipe/drain leaks in the kitchen, and floods the floor?

For the Philippines I think tiles is the best solution! They are hard wearing and available with non-slip surface, for areas like kitchen and in bathrooms.   

 

I like the look of the tiles, that are in strips, and laid like 'tongue and groove' wood floor 'planks'.  They have a textures grain and available in different shades and imitate different types of wood from light 'bamboo' style, through to dark oak look 'planks'.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_U7d-6ZFmQ

 

porcelain-wood-plank-tile-floor.jpg

 

wood-porcelain-tile-floor.jpg?itok=Whd-u

 

porcelain-bedroom-tile-floor.jpg?itok=w7

 

As you can see, there are a variety of colours, grains, textures and different lengths/widths.  I prefer these 'plank' tiles, to the square tiles with 'plank' patterns, as the square shape tiled, butted together, still show as square tiles.

I would minimise the gap between these plank tiles and see if there is like a colored silicone filler one can use in preference to conventional 'grout', that seems to get dirty/stained, over time.

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay
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Dolsos

Wonder what it would take to get a bamboo farm and processing plant started here.  Could be a good export business if demand stays good

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miles-high

 

Bamboo Flooring Cons: • Inexpensive bamboo may be prone to dents and scratches. • Bamboo flooring from China may contain high levels of urea formaldehyde, a toxic chemical; make sure the flooring you buy is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)...

 

I spent days choosing the flooring for my new condo… Bamboo flooring is NOT inexpensive, well, at least in the Manila area (NCR), all imported from China.


So I ended up buying the white washed flooring, similar to the pic below, imported from Germany, which was about ½ the price of bamboo flooring imported from China! :D

 

So far, no regret! :)

 

floor.jpg



 

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BossHog

 

So I ended up buying the white washed flooring

 

How's the WSRF* on that flooring. Looks to be about a 3.

_______

 

My missus would take a bolo to me if i suggested bamboo flooring as it would connote nipa hut subsistence living.

 

 

 

 

*Wine Stain Resistance Factor

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miles-high

 

nipa hut subsistence living

 

 

Is her father member here? :D

 

Anyway, I have not eaten dinner there yet... I will have a dinner party on June 2 and will test it to see how the floor takes a drop or two of red wine... ;)

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SkyMan

Wonder what it would take to get a bamboo farm and processing plant started here.  Could be a good export business if demand stays good

I was considering manufacturing some for my own use as counter tops.  Need some good power tools though.  At least a table saw and nice wide planer.

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smokey

Well i have had wood floors in my house now 8 years so i guess its possible ... 

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the boss

What are you all talking about here?

Traditional hardwood flooring in the US is tongue and groove .75 inch thick and can be refinished. It will last indefinately if not exposed to water.

The only bamboo flooring I've seen in the US is the floating floor style. Panels that lock to gather and vary in price considerable. 

Backed with MDF.

Do know floating floors are not refinishable.

I had understood that bamboo was generally harvested on sustaniable farms approx every 7 years?

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the boss

I was considering manufacturing some for my own use as counter tops.  Need some good power tools though.  At least a table saw and nice wide planer.

I understand that it well eat saw  and planer blades up fast.

I think you have to glue it to gather in a industrial process to get thick planks?

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Speaking of floors, what do you call those glossy white ones that have no grouts? Such as this:

loft-apartment-decorating-ideas-glossy-f

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Canuck Joe

 

Speaking of floors, what do you call those glossy white ones that have no grouts? Such as this:loft-apartment-decorating-ideas-glossy-f

epoxy paint would be my guess

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I have used bamboo floorings, and seen a lot of it in other houses in different colors. It is "very nice" to step on. having one instantly give your home an instant Asian feel and look. I think it's not porous enough to absorb wood stain so if it's been sealed with colored sealer and get's scratch, you will see white scratch marks. Our neighbour used a darker colored bamboo flooring (of course with color stain), any scratch would show.  This is the reason why I chose the natural color/honey for my house because scratches doesn't show so much. also, it's bamboo is hard, better than most wood.

 

Hong Kong is very humid and so far, I can say that this suits very well and it doesn't shrink either.. For kitchen, it's always practical to use wood tile if you really want to get the wood effect, like what I did in our house. Here's the link: http://ImageEvent.com/peggfamilyhk/countryvilla

 

I used "wood" ceramic tiles for my house in Cebu (currently under construction). Easy to clean, high heeled shoes on parties and kids being in and out - most practical. You can see that it blends in with real wood on my stairs. post-12623-0-44366200-1368951339_thumb.jpgpost-12623-0-59135200-1368951351_thumb.jpg

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epoxy paint would be my guess

I think they're using what they call "man-made" granite stone. That's what they use for work tops as well. I've been told it can be more hard wearing than some real granite stones, after all, (if I got it right) it's also made of real stone particles. They can make the joints invisible. 

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